U.S. Military: UFO Investigations, Knowledge & Disclosure(s)

AlchoPwn

Public Service is my Motto.
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
2,561
Reaction score
4,073
Points
154
I have or think I have noticed a more of a leaning in the
media towards they do exist in recent weeks.

Well, if the US government is blowing big bucks on the issue those bloody UFOs had damn well better exist!

On the other hand, given the history of the skunkworks at Nellis AFB aka Area 51, perhaps the USA is more interested in spyplanes from foreign powers. It is a known fact that the USSR used to treat the SR-71 Blackbird as a UFO. In Airforce parlance a UFO is simply an unidentified plane in national airspace after all.

This is not to suggest that I don't consider the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors a possibility, but as in Scooby Doo, it is good cover to spook people out as a means of distracting them from what is really going on. Just misdirection a la stage magic. Where are those meddling kids when you need them huh?
 

Anonymous-50446

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,857
Reaction score
10,903
Points
279
Are they getting us ready for disclosure?
I think there'd be more compelling stuff if they were. If it starts appearing regularly for a long period, I'd be looking for bad news being hid first and then maybe consdier that.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
8,333
Reaction score
17,960
Points
314
The thing I found weird about the motion UFO footage is that the UFO appears to always be in the same place on the screen while the background is moving, which makes me think its something attached to the lens...

Take a look at the Lockheed Martin Sniper targeting pod:


The snippet between about 1:15 and 1:20 shows its stabilisation against a remote aerial target.

maximus otter
 

AlchoPwn

Public Service is my Motto.
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
2,561
Reaction score
4,073
Points
154
I think there'd be more compelling stuff if they were. If it starts appearing regularly for a long period, I'd be looking for bad news being hid first and then maybe consdier that.

I am enjoying your cynicism Coal. This was launched on the same day that the Mueller Investigation got Trump e-mails that were (according to the "esteemed" President) "illegally" obtained. Add this to the pile of Whitehouse faceplants and own goals of late? Whoop! Whoop! Whoop! Nyuk nyuk nyuk.
 

MrRING

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
5,303
Reaction score
1,718
Points
234
Take a look at the Lockheed Martin Sniper targeting pod:


The snippet between about 1:15 and 1:20 shows its stabilisation against a remote aerial target.

To me, the footage you linked looks right and accurate to what I'd expect to see, based on the range of the scope lens and the fact that there is still some movement behind the target showing that it is moving separately from the camera. The UFO footage just looks like it's tracking exactly to the movements of the camera, so it looks like it is artificial to the image and not in space. While it rotates, it doesn't appear to move any other way in space from the camera, remaining perfectly in the same distance away from the camera, not varying by moving further forward or away from the camera, or by going faster or slower than the airplane.

I'm not saying it's not a real phenomenon, it just looks a little weird and not what I would expect from "for-reals" UFO footage.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
... perhaps the USA is more interested in spyplanes from foreign powers. It is a known fact that the USSR used to treat the SR-71 Blackbird as a UFO. In Airforce parlance a UFO is simply an unidentified plane in national airspace after all. ...

There's no 'perhaps' about it ... That was the rationale underlying the earlier Projects Sign, Grudge, and Blue Book. I'm pretty confident the same sort of rationale played a major, if not sole, role in motivating this most recently revealed program.

Consider the two examples cited so far - the Nimitz encounter incident and the suggestive videos (which may or may not be from the Nimitz incident). The bits that (IMHO) fostered DOD interest were:

- visual sighting of what might have been a sub-launched aerial craft (e.g., drone) not far off the US coastline
- apparent behavior of said craft suggestive of unknown advanced capabilities
- anomalous evidence involving recently deployed detection / tracking / targeting systems suggestive of advanced capabilities, spoofing countermeasures, or maybe even critical flaws in those systems
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
9,787
Points
299
There's no 'perhaps' about it ... That was the rationale underlying the earlier Projects Sign, Grudge, and Blue Book. I'm pretty confident the same sort of rationale played a major, if not sole, role in motivating this most recently revealed program.

Consider the two examples cited so far - the Nimitz encounter incident and the suggestive videos (which may or may not be from the Nimitz incident). The bits that (IMHO) fostered DOD interest were:

- visual sighting of what might have been a sub-launched aerial craft (e.g., drone) not far off the US coastline
- apparent behavior of said craft suggestive of unknown advanced capabilities
- anomalous evidence involving recently deployed detection / tracking / targeting systems suggestive of advanced capabilities, spoofing countermeasures, or maybe even critical flaws in those systems
Yes, people are complaining about money being spent on something that should definitely be of interest to the military, investigating unknown objects in the area. They are potential military assets of a foreign (Earthly) power.
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
9,787
Points
299
Interview with one of the authors of the NY Times article. He states the military has unknown physical material from objects, at the two minute point.

 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
32,196
Reaction score
19,644
Points
314
Interview with one of the authors of the NY Times article. He states the military has unknown physical material from objects, at the two minute point.

When I hear direct from the Pentagon themselves that they have unknown UFO material, I might be more inclined to believe it. At least the journalist admitted this was a diversion from the major political news stories.
 

MrRING

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
5,303
Reaction score
1,718
Points
234
Why don't we see footage of either the object flying into the frame, or leaving? That would help me feel there was authenticity to it...
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
Take a look at the Lockheed Martin Sniper targeting pod:
The snippet between about 1:15 and 1:20 shows its stabilisation against a remote aerial target. ...

Good illustration, but ...

The Navy aircraft involved in the Nimitz incident (and ostensibly illustrated in the other videos) were using a different system sourced from Raytheon.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
Why don't we see footage of either the object flying into the frame, or leaving? That would help me feel there was authenticity to it...

The acquisition / lock-on phase seems to be missing or non-existent in the purported Navy intercept videos. You're right - unless it's an editing omission it's suspicious.
 

Xanatic*

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,469
Reaction score
4,893
Points
164
The unknown alloys is what caught my interest, actual physical evidence. Though it is probably too much to hope for a warehouse filled with pieces of metal floating in the air.
 

Anonymous-50446

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,857
Reaction score
10,903
Points
279
The acquisition / lock-on phase seems to be missing or non-existent in the purported Navy intercept videos. You're right - unless it's an editing omission it's suspicious.
It flies in the face of the apparent openness of releasing the videos in the first place.
 

INT21

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,757
Reaction score
6,466
Points
279
When reading of the extraordinary capabilities of the US and other military powers, particularly the navies, and taking the supposed undersea bases into the equation. It should be remembered that the combined might of half a dozen counties can't find a submarine off the coast of Argentina. Nor can our whole technical capabilities find an airliner in the ocean.
Maybe we are not as clever as the governments would like us to think.

INT21
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
... It should be remembered that the combined might of half a dozen counties can't find a submarine off the coast of Argentina. Nor can our whole technical capabilities find an airliner in the ocean. ...

Good point. However, military sensor and detection capabilities are geared toward locating whole (i.e., active) vehicular objects of potential concern rather than their disintegrated fragments. The fragments are the intended eventual outcome, not the evidence originally sought.
 

Ringo

Musky Sly Old Foxy Stoat
Joined
Feb 24, 2005
Messages
3,019
Reaction score
4,829
Points
189
Location
Stockholm
When reading of the extraordinary capabilities of the US and other military powers, particularly the navies, and taking the supposed undersea bases into the equation. It should be remembered that the combined might of half a dozen counties can't find a submarine off the coast of Argentina. Nor can our whole technical capabilities find an airliner in the ocean.
Maybe we are not as clever as the governments would like us to think.

INT21
I have often thought this myself. All this talk of fire and fury, modern warfare and military capabilities - it just seems like two tribes arguing over who has the pointier stick. We don't seem to invent much when it comes to understanding our physical realm and how to master the physical world. We have advancements in military technology but that's just refinement of, or increase in, deadliness.

I just don't think that we're clever enough as a species yet to make the necessary leaps. Or maybe we're just not motivated enough. When Climate change really kicks in and the planet is becoming hostile, then we'll start to really look at how to get away from it.
 

AlchoPwn

Public Service is my Motto.
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
2,561
Reaction score
4,073
Points
154
I have often thought this myself. All this talk of fire and fury, modern warfare and military capabilities - it just seems like two tribes arguing over who has the pointier stick. We don't seem to invent much when it comes to understanding our physical realm and how to master the physical world. We have advancements in military technology but that's just refinement of, or increase in, deadliness.

Firstly, Ringo, I must disagree with you on the notion that we as a species don't invent much when it comes to understanding our physical world. Since the advent of science, the sheer volume of machines devoted solely to measuring things to obtain an understanding of our world has simply blossomed beyond belief. For example, the computer you are now using has literally millions of potential scientific uses when attached to appropriate devices. Every single laboratory in the world is filled with glassware, some of which can be traced back to the 1st Century AD when similar devices were used in Hermetic alchemy, such as the water powered vacuum pump that created the "Hermetic Seal", but it will also have hundreds, if not thousands of other items that have been made since. It is a pity I don't know where you live, I would love to take you on a tour of some university labs I have access to and show you many thousands of devices, some worth millions of dollars, that are used every day to help our species push back our ignorance of our physical reality.

Here is a link to Rowe Scientific:
https://www.rowe.com.au/rowe/Products.htm

Pretty much every product listed is or can be used for exactly what you say we haven't invented things to do, and this catalog is only a tiny fraction of what is out there.

On the other hand, academics seldom have the sort of budgets that corporations and the military have to spend on their research. It is hilarious how successful academics are in comparison to those better-funded projects, however. The old adage that "the USA spent a million dollars to develop a biro that would write in zero gravity, while the USSR used pencils", holds true it seems.

On the other hand, war does serve as a major driving force in human technical advancement. If you look at nature for a moment and consider the process of evolution, you can see that every living thing is involved in an evolutionary arms race to avoid being prey while potentially killing and consuming some other species. As humans are part of that ecological system, only consciously aware of the system, it would be wrong to suppose that we are not or should not be part of that pattern of life. Nature is writ red in tooth and claw; if you are an obligate vegetarian, you are prey; so sayeth the food chain; its the circle of life, hakuna matata etc.

What I find interesting is that so few cultures developed what we now call "secret weapons" or what the military scientists now call the "technical surprise". The fact is that in most societies there was a strict distinction between the military, the natural philosophers (scientists) and the artisans, such that the military didn't know they had the option, the scientists weren't interested in inventing secret weapons unless there was a threat to their research, and artisans had no market impetus to organize their creation until after the secret was common knowledge. In many ways it is not until the 20th century that we get a situation where everything lines up and we have science and technology heavily being invested into military applications. Even in the 19th Century the British admiralty were very resistant to the notion of steam powered ships for example.

To summarise: The military mind has not generally been very open to new ideas, that is a new thing.
 

Ringo

Musky Sly Old Foxy Stoat
Joined
Feb 24, 2005
Messages
3,019
Reaction score
4,829
Points
189
Location
Stockholm
Firstly, Ringo, I must disagree with you on the notion that we as a species don't invent much when it comes to understanding our physical world....

And I agree with you completely. I wrote my post in a "not quite really awake" moment earlier today. I didn't express myself clearly when I wrote "physical realm". Of course, the evolution of the sciences has done nothing but explore our physical word and has give us a huge understanding of our universe. And Vagazzles.

I suppose I meant that which lies on the periphery or the extremes of the known physical realm. The fringe sciences. We like to believe that we are technologically advanced and yet, as INT21 said, we can lose an entire aeroplane full of passengers and still have no idea of where it went despite mutual-national cooperation and huge resources. We are at the mercy of the elements and can only exist/thrive in a very narrow band of the Earth's environment. We have not even mapped all of our oceans. We are very much in our infancy when it comes to using technology to expoit our environment.

And yes, the military complex is a strong driving force. I really hope there is a lab somewhere with some wild-haired crackpot trying to making stuff float or become invisible.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
... On the other hand, war does serve as a major driving force in human technical advancement. ...

Case in point ...

We're currently able to discuss this as we are (in near-real-time, strewn across multiple continents) using the latter-day disseminated / commercialized version of what was originally developed as a command and control network for nuclear war.

It's still my opinion that the Internet is the most significant sword ever converted into a plowshare ...
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
32,935
Reaction score
41,141
Points
314
Location
East of Suez
It's still my opinion that the Internet is the most significant sword ever converted into a plowshare ...

Ah, but a double-edged ploughshare--or something...
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,284
Reaction score
32,271
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
Ah, but a double-edged ploughshare--or something...

Indeed! There's no doubt the 'plowshare' has been leveraged to produce a new 'sword', and even a new form of warfare.
 

INT21

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,757
Reaction score
6,466
Points
279
America is, or so it likes to think (it's probably right) the most powerful military on Earth. China and Russia are no so far behind. But all that means is that the USA has the power to wipe out countries it disagrees with uicker than, say, Korea.

Yet I have been following the latest shenanigans on Capitol Hill. lots of talk about people losing benefits etc. I'm not American so I am not directly effected.

But, Trump wishes to spend a further $800 Billion on the military. This is on top of the extra $40 Billion per month he has been spending on it during the last three month.

It is claimed that the state of the military is dire.

So where has all the money gone ?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
44,371
Reaction score
36,658
Points
314
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
So where has all the money gone ?
Rather expensive bombs and missiles, dropped on Iraq and Afghanistan.
Oh, and black projects.
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
9,787
Points
299
The acquisition / lock-on phase seems to be missing or non-existent in the purported Navy intercept videos. You're right - unless it's an editing omission it's suspicious.
One of the videos does show the targeted object leaving the lock on at the end. It's locked in for some time, and then all of a sudden it just moves out of lock and away it goes.

The reports the object had moved to the "Cap point" of the fighter planes is also interesting. The Cap point seems to be where the jets were told to back off to, but the I do gets there much faster than the jets.
 

INT21

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,757
Reaction score
6,466
Points
279
MrRing,

..The thing I found weird about the motion UFO footage is that the UFO appears to always be in the same place on the screen while the background is moving, which makes me think its something attached to the lens rather than an object far away from the plane,..

Depends upon the sophistication of the aiming computer.

Have you seen the Sophia airborne telescope ?

The telescope on this plane stays locked on the star of choice while the plane moves around it. So you get a similar image of an object locked in the middle of the screen.

INT21
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
9,787
Points
299
In the early 1980's I visited NASA JPL in LA during one of their open house days. One of their demonstrations was clicking on a live video person walking around the campus in a crowd in a live video feed. The system would then track the person as they moved through the crowd.
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
9,787
Points
299
There also plenty of gun camera video out there showing systems locked on a target.
 
Last edited:
Top