Underground (Miscellaneous: Tunnels, Roads, Bunkers Etc.)

Yithian

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Five Companions Dead German Soldier Buried Alive 6 Years, Lives

WARSAW —(U.P.) —A 32-year-old German soldier who said he had been buried alive for six years in a Nazi supply depot was given a good chance by hospital authorities today to regain his health and eyesight. _ . The six-foot German, who was not identified by authorities at Gdynia’s Akademia hospital, said he and five companions were trapped in an underground German army food and supply warehouse by retreating Nazi troops who dynamited the entrance early in 1945.).

The soldier and one other survivor of the entombment stumbled bearded, blinded and blubbering from the bunker about a month ago when Polish workers cleared wreckage from the entrance to the depot at Babie Doly, near Gydnia. The second survivor dropped dead of shock on emerging into the daylight. The other said two of his companions committed suicide a few months after they were entombed by German troops who did not know the soldiers were in the depot. The trapped men were believed to have been looting. Two others of the trapped soldiers died of unknown causes, the survivor said. Air entered the tomb through an air vent undamaged by the explosion. Water trickled through cracks and the men had plenty of food. But they lived in darkness after their supply of candles was exhausted two years ago. The trapped men had no tools with which to dig their way out of the concrete bunker, the survivor said. He said they washed in Rhine wine and encased their dead in huge flour sacks. The bodies were almost perfectly mummified.

HUGHES SPIKES RUMORS HOLLYWOOD OJ.R)— Howard Hughes said today there is no truth to rumors that he plans to sell his controlling interest in RKO Radio Pictures, Inc...

Extract from:
Madera Tribune, Number 65, 18 June 1951 https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=MT19510618.2.5
 
Last edited:

Tribble

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Just been reading about the tunnels under Black Mountain in Queensland, Australia. The stuff of horror stories.

The Kuku Nyungkal people of the region have long shunned the mountain, calling it Kalkajaka, meaning “the place of the spear” and sometimes translated simply as “The Mountain of Death.” Aboriginal tales tell of the mountain as a haunted place, home to various evil spirits and demons lurking within, which are said to hunger for human souls, one of which is the spirit of a wicked medicine man called the Eater of Flesh. Stories tell of any unfortunate to approach the mountain being dragged to their deaths within its bowels by spectral hands, and shadowy ghosts are often allegedly seen here.

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2014/12/the-mysterious-black-mountain-of-queensland/
 

Naughty_Felid

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Five Companions Dead German Soldier Buried Alive 6 Years, Lives

WARSAW —(U.P.) —A 32-year-old German soldier who said he had been buried alive for six years in a Nazi supply depot was given a good chance by hospital authorities today to regain his health and eyesight. _ . The six-foot German, who was not identified by authorities at Gdynia’s Akademia hospital, said he and five companions were trapped in an underground German army food and supply warehouse by retreating Nazi troops who dynamited the entrance early in 1945.).

The soldier and one other survivor of the entombment stumbled bearded, blinded and blubbering from the bunker about a month ago when Polish workers cleared wreckage from the entrance to the depot at Babie Doly, near Gydnia. The second survivor dropped dead of shock on emerging into the daylight. The other said two of his companions committed suicide a few months after they were entombed by German troops who did not know the soldiers were in the depot. The trapped men were believed to have been looting. Two others of the trapped soldiers died of unknown causes, the survivor said. Air entered the tomb through an air vent undamaged by the explosion. Water trickled through cracks and the men had plenty of food. But they lived in darkness after their supply of candles was exhausted two years ago. The trapped men had no tools with which to dig their way out of the concrete bunker, the survivor said. He said they washed in Rhine wine and encased their dead in huge flour sacks. The bodies were almost perfectly mummified.

HUGHES SPIKES RUMORS HOLLYWOOD OJ.R)— Howard Hughes said today there is no truth to rumors that he plans to sell his controlling interest in RKO Radio Pictures, Inc...

Extract from:
Madera Tribune, Number 65, 18 June 1951 https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=MT19510618.2.5
Any other sources? I find this hard to believe and seemingly a take on the Japanese not surrendering in the jungle routine

edit:

http://translate.google.co.uk/trans...r+1951&hl=en&rlz=1C1GGLS_en-GBGB334GB334&sa=G


Seems very unlikely but I'll keep digging.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Anyone got access to Time? This is where the original source was. I cannot find any other evidence-based links to this, and I'm assuming it would have been massive news?
 

Naughty_Felid

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Several here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babie_Doły,_Pomeranian_Voivodeship

And the events inspired a film:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blockhouse

Described as being inspired by a 'possibly true' story; however, it was reported by Time Magazine, which is respectable.
I'm thinking bullshit tbh. Think about it, why this was not mentioned in any Soviet papers and the Brits didn't get hold of it?

The Soviets would have had a field day with this.

Also six years?
 

Yithian

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Mythopoeika

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Just been reading about the tunnels under Black Mountain in Queensland, Australia. The stuff of horror stories.

The Kuku Nyungkal people of the region have long shunned the mountain, calling it Kalkajaka, meaning “the place of the spear” and sometimes translated simply as “The Mountain of Death.” Aboriginal tales tell of the mountain as a haunted place, home to various evil spirits and demons lurking within, which are said to hunger for human souls, one of which is the spirit of a wicked medicine man called the Eater of Flesh. Stories tell of any unfortunate to approach the mountain being dragged to their deaths within its bowels by spectral hands, and shadowy ghosts are often allegedly seen here.

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2014/12/the-mysterious-black-mountain-of-queensland/
A prime candidate for an expedition!
 

Ulalume

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There's a nice cavern not far from where I live, discovered by some curious spelunkers -

cavern5.jpg

cavern1.jpg

cavern4.jpg

cavern2.jpg

cavern3.jpg

it's fun to see, but so wet in there that I always feared plummeting to my death, never to be found again.

A couple of years ago while I poking around in the rock garden, I discovered a small opening in the ground ("ground" meaning a big slab of rock) I decided to remove the accumulated silt and see how far down it went. It's just big enough for my arm, so I stuck my arm in nearly to the shoulder but couldn't find the bottom. Then I went in with a stick and nope, still no bottom. :eek: It's really narrow though, so there's no way to see anything. One day I plan to use some fishing line and a weight and see if I can measure the depth.

It would be neat if it were an opening into another cavern. At this point though, it's just a mysterious hole in the garden. :)
 
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There's a nice cavern not far from where I live, discovered by some curious spelunkers -

View attachment 4329

View attachment 4327

View attachment 4328

View attachment 4330

View attachment 4331

it's fun to see, but so wet in there that I always feared plummeting to my death, never to be found again.

A couple of years ago while I poking around in the rock garden, I discovered a small opening in the ground ("ground" meaning a big slab of rock) I decided to remove the accumulated silt and see how far down it went. It's just big enough for my arm, so I stuck my arm in nearly to the shoulder but couldn't find the bottom. Then I went in with a stick and nope, still no bottom. :eek: It's really narrow though, so there's no way to see anything. One day I plan to use some fishing line and a weight and see if I can measure the depth.

It would be neat if it were an opening into another cavern. At this point though, it's just a mysterious hole in the garden. :)
You may have disturbed a sleeping monster...
 

EnolaGaia

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EnolaGaia

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rynner2

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A secret bank vault has been dug up at a Plymouth building site
By WT_Herald | Posted: April 01, 2017

Construction teams working on the huge Oceansgate marine industry centre have unearthed a bank vault, the ruins of hotels and houses, and even a horse's skull – all dating from when Devonport was Blitzed.
Workers from Midas are just two months into the 11-month project and have dug up a host of archaeological treasures.
The area was bombed during World War Two and then the ruins were bulldozed and levelled and turned into a car park.

But in January 2017 work began on the first phase of the Oceansgate marine hub, and that meant digging foundations for two rows of industrial units and a three-storey office block.
That was when the discoveries were made.

Workers unearthed the vault of a bank – with the bomb-buckled metal bars, door and roof still in place.
They also found the basement of a hotel, with fireplaces so the rooms above could be heated.

There is also a row of house foundations, all the properties lost in the Blitz.
And pre-dating all that, there are at least two wells, possibly 400 years old.

Items dragged from their grave include a soldier's helmet, old bottles and lamps and even a horse's skull, possibly a war horse victim of Hitler's Luftwaffe.
The Midas team is on alert for other finds now too, as the project develops.
They have already removed dozens of disused pipes and cables, mostly not marked on any map, which were buried in the days before health and safety was a watchword.

But they are confident there are no unexploded bombs, though small incendiary devices could still be buried, because the area was surveyed by a radar scanner before construction commenced.

Stuart Wilkes, Midas' senior project manager, said: "We've looked at all Ordinance Survey maps and brought in a company using ground-penetrating radar.
They have already removed dozens of disused pipes and cables, mostly not marked on any map, which were buried in the days before health and safety was a watchword.

But they are confident there are no unexploded bombs, though small incendiary devices could still be buried, because the area was surveyed by a radar scanner before construction commenced.

etc...

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/wor...ine-hub-site/story-30237284-detail/story.html

Several photos on page.
 

hunck

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PeteByrdie

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If it was near me I'd go. I went to the one in Kelvedon Hatch which is well worth a visit.

Why don't don't you leave a review on their site - I notice there aren't any.
I must do that if I remember tomorrow.
 

rynner2

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Kitley Caves - the great lost tourist attraction and why it closed
By EMooreHerald | Posted: April 09, 2017

Almost 20 years ago one of the Plymouth area's most loved tourist attractions temporarily closed - and it has never reopened.
Kitley Caves were a cherised landmark in the woods at Yealmpton.
A mecca for school trips and archaeology geeks alike for two decades.
But they closed to the public in 1999 and have remained cordoned off ever since, with little prospect of ever reopening.

So, what went wrong?

The historic caves and grottoes along the Yealm estuary were home to Bronze Age and Stone Age artefacts.
Later, green marble was quarried there - some of which has been used in London landmarks.

Since a Devon workman first blasted a hole and opened up the caves by accident, there have been a number of finds at the caves, including a 6,000-year-old human bone and a lion.
Most recently, a large bear tooth and three flints, possibly parts of arrows and knives, were found.

They opened as a tourist attraction in the 1970s, where visitors would take a self-guided tour from one side of the network to the other.
The two main chambers were known as Bob's Cave and No Name Cave.
But bosses decided in 1999 that not enough people were coming along and, after 114 years of being open, they caves were sealed up.

The Herald reported at the time how they were being closed because tourists are no longer satisfied with simply gazing at the wondrous activities of nature.
The stalactites and stalagmites, underground pools, tunnels and caves, where there are signs of prehistoric man, were just not enough for visitors who are used to hi-tech, high speed and high fun.
Owner Michael Bastard closed the caves to everyone except archaeologists and people keen to see the sites of their discoveries.
He said at the time: "I hope it's not permanent but it could well be."

During their last few years the caves had not performed sufficiently well to warrant opening them.
"Things have changed so dramatically in the tourist leisure market," Mr Bastard said at the time. "The caves no longer meet the needs of people who visit tourist attractions.
"Sunday shopping has been the biggest change, as well as a huge proliferation in tourist attractions. People come to the South Hams for fairly short periods and see perhaps two or three attractions.
"Kitley Caves just aren't on that list. Bigger attractions have more investment and appeal but a few years ago people were happy with small places that were natural."

Mr Bastard believed the only way forward was for the cave, along with 40 or 50 acres of nearby land, to be sold to a developer and turned into a larger site.
"If somebody had an idea for setting up a tourist attraction then Kitley Caves might be that location," he added.
"The days of having caves as the centre of an attraction are most likely gone forever."

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/kit...hy-it-closed/story-30259275-detail/story.html

Photos on page.
I'm surprised I've never heard of these caves before, despite having lived and worked in the South Hams or Plymouth when they were open. The caves still have several mentions on the web - this one has more photos:

http://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/mai...itley-caves-devon-june-08-a.html#.WOtEjKK1sdU
 
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