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Underground (Miscellaneous: Tunnels, Roads, Bunkers Etc.)

When we had coal mines you would sometimes see notices tied to lap posts much like
you sometimes see notices of application for planning permission, these would be from
the mine owners and give details of "Withdrawal of Support" in other words shafts being
left and not maintained left to collapse, the last time I saw this likely 50 years back a row
of very nice houses nearby started to have subsidence problems not long after, there were
no mines near by and from what I could find out the tunnels in question were from a mine
several miles away, that area was subject to subsidence from then on but who payed for
fixing it, not a clue.
:dunno: :dunno:
 
This may be of interest to any in the Norwich area,
At the beginning of WW11 a air raid precautions scheme was instigated by
Reckitt and Colman of Carrow Works, this included boring five tunnels through
the chalk substrata these were under Carrow Abby meadow they had five entrances
and extended a 100ft and at the end joined with a 12 ft transverse tunnel, and were
ventilated by 9 inch shafts from above, the tunnels were between 5ft 6 inches and 12ft
wide lined with steel plates they were under forteen ft of undisturbed chalk and could
accommodate 1,000 people.
Anyone live in the area? is it all under houses now I wonder? local knowledge?

Looks like there is still some open space in the area. Carrow Abby is now a conference center
and in a gate house protected industrial park.


https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Carrow+Abbey,+Norwich+NR1+2EE/@52.6180721,1.3093332,255m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m6!3m5!1s0x47d9e38cd59d8939:0x3b4eb7d57a295805!8m2!3d52.61793!4d1.3108443!16s/g/1ygjd1f4h?entry=ttu
 
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Florida city uncovers mysterious network of secret tunnels

The discovery of a mysterious network of hidden tunnels beneath a Florida city has sparked wild theories about their origin.

85751891-13498187-image-a-1_1717600724196.jpg


The passageways under Ybor City, a suburb near downtown Tampa, remained hidden for decades before a string of discoveries revealed the subterranean network.

Historians have since speculated widely over their use, from moving moonshine, human trafficking and cash smuggling to simply 'as a sewer'.

The latest tunnels were found in 2018 near the Old Florida Brewery, close to East 6th Avenue and Noccio Parkway, while construction was being carried out on a new office building.

Workers were tearing down a warehouse when they found the hidden passage, tall enough to stand up in with a rounded ceiling.

Several of the tunnels are brick-lined and only a few feet tall by a few feet wide - just enough for an adults to crouch or crawl through. The layered brickworks suggests they were constructed by skilled laborers.

85752965-13498187-image-a-14_1717602113940.jpg


Researchers used imaging techniques to map the direction and depth of some of the tunnels

There's been talk about mysterious passageways underneath the suburb of Ybor City in Central Florida going back about 20 years, according to Professor Gary Mormino.

Mormino, 77, who has been researching the history of Ybor City for about 40 years, said the first tunnels of this kind were unearthed about two decades ago.

'That provoked the question, "Why would you build a tunnel in an area that has a water table of about one foot below sea level?"'

While some have guessed the underground passages may have been used by bootleggers, Mormino said that doesn't make sense, and it's more likely they were used to bring in prostitutes or Chinese laborers from Cuba.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13498187/florida-secret-tunnels-Ybor-City.html

maximus otter
 

Florida city uncovers mysterious network of secret tunnels

The discovery of a mysterious network of hidden tunnels beneath a Florida city has sparked wild theories about their origin.

85751891-13498187-image-a-1_1717600724196.jpg


The passageways under Ybor City, a suburb near downtown Tampa, remained hidden for decades before a string of discoveries revealed the subterranean network.

Historians have since speculated widely over their use, from moving moonshine, human trafficking and cash smuggling to simply 'as a sewer'.

The latest tunnels were found in 2018 near the Old Florida Brewery, close to East 6th Avenue and Noccio Parkway, while construction was being carried out on a new office building.

Workers were tearing down a warehouse when they found the hidden passage, tall enough to stand up in with a rounded ceiling.

Several of the tunnels are brick-lined and only a few feet tall by a few feet wide - just enough for an adults to crouch or crawl through. The layered brickworks suggests they were constructed by skilled laborers.

85752965-13498187-image-a-14_1717602113940.jpg


Researchers used imaging techniques to map the direction and depth of some of the tunnels

There's been talk about mysterious passageways underneath the suburb of Ybor City in Central Florida going back about 20 years, according to Professor Gary Mormino.

Mormino, 77, who has been researching the history of Ybor City for about 40 years, said the first tunnels of this kind were unearthed about two decades ago.

'That provoked the question, "Why would you build a tunnel in an area that has a water table of about one foot below sea level?"'

While some have guessed the underground passages may have been used by bootleggers, Mormino said that doesn't make sense, and it's more likely they were used to bring in prostitutes or Chinese laborers from Cuba.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13498187/florida-secret-tunnels-Ybor-City.html

maximus otter
I'd say a sewer or drainage.
 
I rode a single-lane highway Elon Musk built in a tunnel under Las Vegas

Elon Musk has built a bustling, neon-colored tunnel underneath the scorching hot blacktop parking lots around the Las Vegas Convention Center.

i-rode-single-lane-highway-912828671_1e86b6.jpg


The tunnels, a product of Musk's Boring Company, are a far cry from the billionaire's initial promises.

In 2018, Musk promised residents in Los Angeles an upcoming 2.7-mile tunnel project.

"Wouldn’t it be better if you could jump inside a pod and go?" he asked as cars congested the nearby highways.

Small stations equipped with elevators and escalators would haul hundreds of people into the subterranean chutes.

Pods traversing the tunnels would carry groups of 16 people up to 150 mph to their destination, Musk claimed.

It would completely modernize roadway traffic as we know it.

Six years after Musk's rush-hour event, I rode in the Las Vegas Loop, a brainchild of this project, at the Advanced Clean Technology Expo.

There are no pods, there are Teslas.

We traveled at standard road speeds, not 150 mph. It was hundreds of miles from the promised Los Angeles construction site, and it was a mile shorter than the initial project.

But some road engineers believe the still nascent project's promise is critical to the modern American city.

https://www.the-sun.com/motors/11739322/elon-musk-boring-company-evs-tunnels-vegas/

maximus otter
 
I rode a single-lane highway Elon Musk built in a tunnel under Las Vegas

Elon Musk has built a bustling, neon-colored tunnel underneath the scorching hot blacktop parking lots around the Las Vegas Convention Center.

i-rode-single-lane-highway-912828671_1e86b6.jpg


The tunnels, a product of Musk's Boring Company, are a far cry from the billionaire's initial promises.

In 2018, Musk promised residents in Los Angeles an upcoming 2.7-mile tunnel project.

"Wouldn’t it be better if you could jump inside a pod and go?" he asked as cars congested the nearby highways.

Small stations equipped with elevators and escalators would haul hundreds of people into the subterranean chutes.

Pods traversing the tunnels would carry groups of 16 people up to 150 mph to their destination, Musk claimed.

It would completely modernize roadway traffic as we know it.

Six years after Musk's rush-hour event, I rode in the Las Vegas Loop, a brainchild of this project, at the Advanced Clean Technology Expo.

There are no pods, there are Teslas.

We traveled at standard road speeds, not 150 mph. It was hundreds of miles from the promised Los Angeles construction site, and it was a mile shorter than the initial project.

But some road engineers believe the still nascent project's promise is critical to the modern American city.

https://www.the-sun.com/motors/11739322/elon-musk-boring-company-evs-tunnels-vegas/

maximus otter
Unless the tunnel goes to every building, park, shopping centre, house, school, workplace etc it seems a bit of a waste of time and money- just to get a maximum of 16 vehicles off the roads.

I don't think that will make much difference in Los Angeles to be honest.
 

Seaside city's secrets hidden in underground tunnels​

A tunnel beneath the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. The tunnel has straight side and a curved roof. The walls are white but the paint is peeling away. There is a square light on the left wall.

There have long been rumours about why a king had tunnels built under his place of residence in Brighton



Millions of people pass through Brighton railway station each year, but how many are aware of the secrets below their feet?
Hidden beneath the tracks are mosaic bathrooms, World War Two communication rooms and even a rifle range.


Brighton’s network of underground secrets stretches far across the city, with Victorian sewer systems, a hidden road, and tunnels below the Royal Pavilion rumoured to be built for King George IV to meet his lover.

The BBC has been given special access to this seaside labyrinth to find out what it reveals about the city that lies above.

A stairwell, the stairs a turquoise but they are covered in dirt. There are white and black tiles on the walls. The banisters are golden.

Dirt covers the turquoise tiles used on the stairs and throughout the station's underground spaces.

“Nobody would know this was here,” says tour guide Rob Whitehead, sorting through a ball of keys before unlocking a door from the busy station concourse.

It leads to a staircase that is now grubby but would once have gleamed with shiny, turquoise tiles. Posters informing commuters that the passage will close in 2005 are still on the walls.

Below are the station's former public toilets, old entrances from Trafalgar Street and a women’s hairdressers – all of which are now storage spaces for the shops above.

A room covered in white and yellow tiling. The floor is blue mosaic. This room was formerly the women's toilets at Brighton Station

The steps down to the toilets beneath the station meant they were not accessible to all people, so they were moved upstairs 19 years ago.

Further into the depths of the station, a cobbled road runs alongside its old east wall.

“It was how the old horse-drawn cabs used to get up onto the platform,” says Rob.

A new external wall was added when the station expanded, meaning the road was hidden away.

Brighton Station was built in 1840 but it was not until 1928 that the toilets and now-faded mosaics were added.

A dark tunnel with cobbled ground. On the right is the original station wall while on the left is the newer external wall built when the station was expanded.

On the right is the original station wall while on the left is the newer external wall built when the station was expanded.

Another abandoned space is a former service tunnel deep inside the station, previously used to load goods onto trains but converted during World War Two.

“They moved all the telecommunications for the railway down here,” Rob explains. “If the station was ever bombed, they could still operate from this space.”

A small, windowless room. It is painted yellow, but paint is falling from the walls. There is a green desk and yellow chair in the room. The floor is dark wood. There is a single strip light.

This room would have been station's communication centre during wartime bombings.

But at the far end of the tunnel is the station's best-kept secret.

“You can hear the gentle rumble of a train above our heads," says Rob. "It’s a very secluded space, so a rifle range is a perfect use for this space."

Built for recreational shooting practice in the late 1940s, the range is still used by a rifle club today.

A white, brick archway with the shooting range

Buried deep within the station is the Brighton Railway Rifle Club Range, which sits alongside filing cabinets.

The station was key in connecting Brighton with the rest of the UK. By 1850, it had grown from a fishing village to a hub of more than 60,000 residents and was a tourist hotspot.

Thousands flocked from London as the sea water was rumoured to have healing qualities.

Brighton station with a Southern train

Brighton station was built in 1840.

But at the time, sewage flowed from people's homes into cesspools.

It was not until the late 1800s that engineers built a sewer network sprawling 30 miles (48 km) under Brighton, costing £104,000 – an equivalent of £14.7m today.

A black and white image showing two men laying bricks for Brighton's Victorian sewers

The Victorian people had to dig the sewer tunnels by hand.

It allowed sewage to flow away from homes and out to sea.

The sewers are still operational today, though sewage is treated at a new plant in Peacehaven.

A group of people in white hard hats inside a brown brick sewer chamber

This chamber is 30 feet (9.14m) underground and is where the main sewers beneath London Road and Lewes Road meet.

In the 18th century, Brighton had become a popular getaway for the Royal Family. The Royal Pavilion was built in 1787 for the Prince of Wales George IV, who became the Prince Regent in 1811 and King George IV in 1820.

Below the Pavilion is a network of tunnels which had many different uses - from storing dirty laundry to accessing George’s private bedroom.
It was rumoured that King George IV had a tunnel built so he could secretly walk underground to the house of Maria Fitzherbet, his lover.
But Dan Cox, head tour guide for Brighton & Hove Museums, said this is unfounded.

"I’m sorry to disappoint people," he said. "There was nothing secret about their relationship.”

Brighton Royal Pavilion, with its numerous domes and minarets, reflected onto a lake

The Royal Pavilion was built for King George IV but later sold to the town in 1850 as Queen Victoria was said to dislike Brighton.

The King did, however, spend £1,783 - an equivalent of £164,082 today - on a tunnel to keep his servants hidden from the gardens as they went between the Pavilion and the stables, now the popular concert venue Brighton Dome.
“That’s the kind of guy that George was,” said Dan.

Dan added that the team at the Pavilion are still uncovering secrets about the building, meaning some of Brighton's buried mysteries are yet to be revealed.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/czrjd4wv10xo
 
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