Unexploded Bombs, Grenades & Other Explosive Military Gear

OneWingedBird

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#1
I Dogpiled details of this one up after my nextdoor neighbour told me about it today. There doesn't seem to be a 'Danger UXB' thread so I thought I'd put it here.


http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticle2.aspx?SectionID=55&ArticleID=853129

Hundreds evacuated after builders find wartime bomb

Chris Benfield, Joanne Ginley
and William Green
HUNDREDS of residents were last night evacuated from their homes after a suspected 1,000lb Second World War German bomb was found in a Leeds suburb.

Residents of about 50 houses in Farsley were advised to leave their homes and warned they might be unable to return for up to two days after the 8ft- long bomb was unearthed in the area.
Those not staying with relatives were last night preparing to bed down in sleeping bags at the nearby Stanningley sports and amateur rugby league club, set up as the emergency centre to deal with the incident. Ambulances and police vehicles were on stand-by outside the club.
The drama began yesterday morning when an excavator unearthed the bomb on the former Broom Mills industrial site at the bottom of Coal Hill Lane, Farsley.
Workmen were preparing the land, believed to be near the site of a wartime ammunition factory, for housing when the discovery was made.
The Army's Catterick Barracks, in North Yorkshire, was alerted but it was decided that experts should be called in from the 33rd Engineer Regiment, in Cambridgeshire, because of the size of the bomb.
The specialist bomb disposal team asked for a 200-metre safety cordon around the site and police officers began advising people in the Springbank Road area to leave their homes yesterday evening.
Last night resident Paul Willis and his neighbour, 80-year-old Norah Dowas, were preparing to spend the night at the sports club – although Leeds Council was trying to find somewhere more comfortable for the pensioner. They live just 400 yards from the bomb site.
Mr Willis, a 55-year-old electrician, said: "The police knocked on the door about 6pm and said we didn't have to go but they advised it.
"I would have stayed but Norah had nowhere to go and I said I would come down here with her while we waited and saw what happened."
Mrs Dowas, a widow, said: "I thought I'd better follow the police advice, as I have only got my sister in South Wales."
Leeds Council's senior emergency planning officer, David Wolstenholme, said the bomb could be even heavier than its estimated 1,000lb weight. "Because of the size of the bomb the Army at Catterick said we needed to deal with the specialists in Cambridge," he added.
n Bingley schoolboy Andrew Burns, 11, sparked the evacuation of Southport beach after he found a 2ft-long wartime bomb – and carried it to sand dunes.
Bomb disposal experts were called in to make the device safe.
Andrew's mother, Karen, said: "I've told him that if he sees any more bombs he has to leave them well alone. It's not something you expect to find when you are paddling.
"Shells and pebbles yes – live bombs no."


In the next version it's 2' shorter and declared safe:

http://www.leedstoday.net/ViewArticle.aspx?SectionID=39&ArticleID=853774

A GIANT earthmover inches across a Leeds building site today carrying what is believed to be a 1,000 lb Second World War German bomb.

The device had been declared safe by Royal Engineers who had raced to Farsley from their Cambridge base.
During the night hundreds left their homes fearing the bomb could devastate the area. Most packed their suitcases, carried their children and pets and went to stay with relatives. The drama began when a contractor in a digger came across the huge metal object – said to be 6ft long and shaped like a beer barrel – as he excavated foundations for new homes.


And then the BBC report that it was just a bit of girder after all!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/west_yorkshire/3643490.stm

Residents home after 'bomb scare'

A suspected World War II bomb found on a building site in Leeds was in fact part of a steel construction girder.
Hundreds of residents had to leave their homes following the find in the Coal Hill Lane area of Farsley on Thursday.

Army bomb disposal teams were called in to deal with what was thought to be an unexploded 1,000lb.

"Experts took a long time to discover it wasn't a bomb at all," said a spokesman for West Yorkshire police.

He added: "It was something that definitely resembled an explosive device."
 
A

Anonymous

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Link

[Emp edit: Fixing big link]

Luftwaffe finally succeed bringing East End to standstill... 66 years after failing in London Blitz
FAMILIES were allowed back in their homes in East London last night (Tues) 24 hours after being evacuated after a 500lb unexploded German wartime bomb was unearthed on a building site close by.


Entrance to site where wartime bomb was found
But they will have to be evacuated again on Wednesday when an Army Bomb disposal unit returns to the site at Bethnal Green.

They will either to remove the World War II relic carefully, or just blow it up with a controlled explosion by robot where it landed unnoticed next to the Regent's Canal almost seven decades ago.


Chaos... as a No 8 London bus gets stuck at the police cordon
Police threw up a 200-yard exclusion zone around Suttons Wharf by the side of the canal after a mechanical digger dug it up on Monday night (May 16).

It closed the normally busy Roman Road, one of the East End's busy rush-hour routes, and put hundred of residents out of their homes.

The local authority, Tower Hamlets, set up a rest centre at a school a mile away, reminiscent of the emergency air-raid shelters of the London Blitz nearly 70 years ago.

But none of the evacuated families turned up, all preferring to stay with relatives or friends.

The confusion led to anger when they tried returning next morning back to their homes. The police wouldn't let them through.

Mum-of-two Shelon Musah, who couldn't get back to her home in Palmer's Road, off Roman Road, was in tears as she stood at the police cordon with her 21-month-old baby, tired and exhausted, waiting to be let back.

"I came out to take my daughter to school and there were police and bomb squad officers everywhere," she told the Advertiser.

"Now I'm not allowed back and my son really needs a feed.

"Monday night they told us four or five times to leave and then come back.

"But now they're not telling us what's going on!"

Schoolboy Charlie Brown, 14, and his cousin Jordan Strong, 15, who had to leave their home nearby in Mace Street, were scared the bomb dropped in the London Blitz would suddenly go off, 66 years later.

"The police told us they were waiting for a scientist to come and see what type of bomb it is," Charlie said.

"They said it might blow up. I was really scared."

Jordan also admitted he was "petrified."

Alex Raye, a 24-year-old waiter at Weaver's Fields café nearby, was afraid there could be more unexploded bombs in the area which was badly damaged in air raids during the London Blitz. He thought this one could "go off at any time."

Shops and businesses were forced to close as an eerie silence fell on the normally bustling main road brought to its knees by the German bomb dropped on Suttons Wharf by the Luftwaffe in 1941.

One company badly hit by the cordon was a lettings and property agency which also rents out accommodation to the homeless.

Its boss Daniel McNally arrived to open as usual on Tuesday, but wasn't allowed through.

"We've been trying in vain to get in all day," he fumed.

"People will be phoning us not knowing what's going on.

"It will be very costly in sales. People in the rented flats could be in dire need of electricity or gas."

Many evacuated residents were annoyed police were not giving information on how long it would take to make the bomb safe.

Samantha Shipton, 31, who lives in a flat just yards from the site, said: "A lot of us have small children and want to know what's going on. But the police have hardly told us anything."

Scotland Yard was still advising drivers and pedestrians to avoid Bethnal Green.

At least 250 bombs were dropped on Bethnal Green during German air raids in 1941. There may have been many more, like the 500-pounder at Sutton's Wharf, which only seem to come to light during the East End's ongoing redevelopment.
 
A

Anonymous

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update on unexploded bomb.

hears a map for you

ps look out for the canal it was fond near thar on the opposite side of the bridge and the street i live in is chrrywood close its on the map.

link needs fixing.

(Done. Have left the rest of it alone. Stu)

East End gets all-clear after Hitler bomb.


THE East End got back to business after 60 hours of chaos caused by a 500lb unexploded bomb dropped by Hitler's Luftwaffe during the London Blitz.


Army used 'steam' machine to make bomb safe
The area was brought to a complete standstill on Monday night after workers on Sutton Wharf by the Regent's Canal in Bethnal Green found the unexploded Second World War device while digging.

London's busy Roman Road was cordoned off and families in nearby blocks of flats had to be evacuated two nights running.


Heroes! Royal Engineers who made 500lb bomb safe for East End
The bomb was finally made safe at 4am Thursday by the Army bomb disposal squad.

The Roman Road slowly came back to life as the tired families returned and shops which had lost two days' trade began reopening.

Cordons have been lifted and all roads are have now opened to traffic again.

The Army remained several hours and finally removed the now-harmless device in the afternoon.

But on Tuesday, it seemed 'touch and go' as police and Army kept the area secure.

Col David Sievwright told the Advertiser: "It might just blow up while they are playing around with it, so we need to make sure the area is safe.

"It is a very delicate process."

They built up blast protection in the neighbourhood to protect properties from showering glass in case the bomb went off.

But the East End cockneys are a sturdy lot. The older ones had lived through the real thing back in 1941.

It brought memories back for pensioner Isabel Burton, now 75, who grew up during the London Blitz.

"These kind of bombs are very dangerous," she tells you in all seriousness. "If this one goes off, everything round here will go up in the air with it."

But in the event, the Army put paid to Hitler's souvenir and mad it safe, albeit 66 years late.
 

rynner2

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#4
Several forums here request:

First poster - please include the story text in your posting.


Personally, I can't be arsed to look at anything that doesn't follow that guideline. Like this. Whatever it is....
 

ArthurASCII

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#5
Unexploded bombs were quite a common event when I was a lad in Lambeth in the 50s/60s. We often used to play on the many "bombsites that littered the area (those that hadn't had Prefabs built on them).
 

uair01

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#6
A week ago I visited Verdun. I could not visit several old forts because the area had been declared "military zone". Back home I did some research on forbidden WW I territories and I stumbled on this story. It sounds like a typical FOAF UL story. What do you think:

One true story about UXB is that a few years ago two German wives reported to the police that their husbands had gone on a weekend trip to Verdun and had not come back.

The French police were glad to have the news as they had found a large hole in the ground with some metal scattered around that looked as though it had come from a car. That is all that has ever been found of the men or their car.

It would appear that they picked up a large UXB, put it in the car, drove off and hit a bump!
Source:
http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=10584&st=80

It is likely that accidents with stupid tourists and UXB's have occured. But I don't believe it ever could happen in such a spectacular fashion.

Neither do I believe the (nice!) story I read in another Verdun book:

German tourists collect ammunition in a WW I battlefield. They are caught by French police. The back of their BMW is full of it. The Ordnance guys say: "Well have to explode it here ..." And they blow up the UXB's together with the German's car ...
 

JamesWhitehead

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#7
Ironic really but any search on Google for +Verdun +car +bomb reveals that there is a Verdun street in Beirut! Evidently a hot spot too. :(
 

uair01

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#8
You inspired me to do the same kind of search in German, and I found this news item:
Frankreich: 21-Jähriger sammelte 2,5 Tonnen Munition - Er starb bei einer Explosion
Ein 21-jähriger Franzose aus dem ostfranzösischen Verdun hat 2,5 Tonnen Munition aus den Weltkriegen gesammelt. Nun starb er, weil eine Granate, als er mit dieser hantierte, detonierte.
Der Nachbar des 21-Jährigen, ein Rentner, konnte gar 3,5 Tonnen Munition vorweisen. Es handelte sich jedoch nicht um Museumsgranaten, sondern um "explosiven Schrott", wie Christian Cleret, ein Experte für Weltkriegsmunition, bekannt gab.
A 21 year old from Verdun gathered 2,5 tons of ammunition. He died when one of the grenades exploded as he handled it ... His neighbor had amassed 3,5 tons of old explosives.
Source

And I found another suspect UL about Verdun and unexploded bombs:
Im Wald um Verdun soll mal ein Camper ein Lagerfeuer gemacht haben, was er nicht wusste, das Feuer loderte über nem Blindgänger ausm WK1... Gross war der Sarg sicher nicht.
A camper made his campfire on top of an unexploded WW1 bomb. The coffin was not big ...
Source
 

naitaka

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#9
I've heard several versions of this story over the years:

Apparently when Lincolnshire County Council were widening the road past RAF Scampton's main gate in about 1958, the 'gate guards' there had to be moved to make way for the new carriageway. Scampton was the WWII home of 617 Sqn, and said "gate guards" were a Lancaster...and a Grand Slam bomb.

When they went to lift the Grand Slam, thought for years to just be an empty casing, with an RAF 8 Ton Coles Crane, it wouldn't budge. "Oh, it must be filled with concrete" they said. Then somebody had a horrible thought .... No!..... Couldn't be? ... Not after all these years out here open to the public to climb over and be photographed sitting astride! .... Could it? .... Then everyone raced off to get the Station ARMO. He carefully scraped off many layers of paint and gingerly unscrewed the base plate.

Yes, you guessed it, live 1944 explosive filling! The beast was very gently lifted onto an RAF 'Queen Mary' low loader, using a much larger civvy crane (I often wonder what, if anything, they told the crane driver), then driven slowly under massive police escort to the coastal experimental range at Shoeburyness. There it was rigged for demolition, and when it 'high ordered', it proved in no uncertain terms to anyone within a ten mile radius that the filling was still very much alive!

Exhaustive investigations then took place, but nobody could find the long-gone 1944, 1945 or 1946 records which might have shown how a live 22,000 lb bomb became a gate guard for nearly the next decade and a half. Some safety distance calculations were done, however, about the effect of a Grand Slam detonating at ground level in the open. Apart from the entire RAF Station, most of the northern part of the City of Lincoln, including Lincoln Cathedral, which dates back to 1250, would have been flattened.
http://www.gunnies.pac.com.au/gallery/grand_slam.htm
 

rynner2

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#10
Back in the 70s I was in the Coastguard, and once had to go to Westward Ho!, North Devon, where someone had found 'something' on the beach. It looked dangerous, so we called in Bomb Disposal. The chap who turned up identified it as a hedgehog bomb, and decided to blow it up to be on the safe side.

After we retired well away from it, he pressed the button and a satisfying explosion took place.

"Yes," he said, "That was a live one!"



More recently a wartime bomb was dredged up in Falmouth harbour during work to deepen the channel up the Penryn river, but I'm blowed if I can find the story in the local papers or via Google!
 

shellac7

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#11
My Uncle Brian ran a team of JCB's about 6 years ago that where clearing part of the old railway works on Goldsmiths Avenue in Portsmouths Fratton Station. For those that don't know Portsmouth was a big target for bombs due to its naval significance.
"Those turntables were bloody 'ard I tell yer. Took weeks to get though all the concrete and brick, and the clay top of the soil kept stickin to me shovel on the digger. So, I find's meself an old water tank in the ground and moves it over to a solid wall. When me shovel got covered in clay i'd bang it against the tank to knock off the dirt, then go back to digging out.
One day one of me lads comes runnin' over all white as a sheet, found a big shell and nearly chomped though it. So we calls Bomb Disposal and they comes to the site all geared up for somethin' special. They takes a look at me water tank and says "Oh my , thats a 1000 pounder" i'd been bangin' me shovel on it for near two weeks"
 

liveinabin

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#12
I recall a number of years ago a UXB being found under an old football pitch on Portland. My dad had spent many an afternoon as a lad running up and down there.
 

OldTimeRadio

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#13
I read a magazine article during the mid-1980s, possibly in the SMITHSONIAN, which stated that bomb crews in the Verdun area had worked eight- and 10-hour days, year round, from 1918 onwards, to unearth and defuse buried bombs remaining from the War to End All Wars.

At that time it was estimated that a bare minimum of FIVE MILLION bombs still remained buried in the Verdun environs.

My guess is that the story which opened this thread isn't an Urban Legend at all.
 

StormMagic

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#14
I went on a school trip to Verdun and we went to Vimy Ridge. We were warned against wandering around in the shell-holes incase we stumbled on an unexploded device, I suppose there must still be plenty still in the ground, when you see how pitted the landscape is it doesn't seem so incredible.
 

OneWingedBird

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#15
I don't think we have a strange ocurrances with vegetables thread, so here we go.

Guess someone wasn't expecting a mystery 'pineapple' :shock:

Grenade found in pile of potatoes

A World War II hand grenade has been found in a pile of potatoes at a factory on Teesside.

The unexploded device was discovered in the potato store at the United Biscuits plant on the Cowpen Lane Industrial Estate in Billingham on Friday night.

Security officers summoned a bomb disposal team from Catterick Garrison, and the grenade was de-activated.

A controlled explosion is to be carried out on Saturday, and local people are warned not to be alarmed by the noise.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7717320.stm
 
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#20
BlackRiverFalls said:
why not, you could use it for pass the parcel at your next christmas do?


:D
Ireland has an association with both potatos and grenades. NOt a good idea to combine the two.

Or, maybe, insert a grenade into a large potato, give it to someone nasty and tell it would make an excellent baked potato.
 

OneWingedBird

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#22
sorry ramon. bad weekend.

i was thinking of that rather dodgy joke about the most nerve racking party game in a belfast pub!
 

OneWingedBird

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#23
I could have sworn we had some sort of uxb/ww2 munitions misplaced thread around here somewhere, if we have, i'm buggered if i can find it.

WW2 grenade found in Beeston, Leeds. Pity it didn;t go off, might have improved the area!

Leeds grenade blast

ARMY bomb dispoal experts have sealed off an area in Beeston, Leeds after a war-time grenade was found.
Experts from the unit carried out a controlled explosion Thursday morning after the weapon was found at 7.34pm on Wednesday.

It was uncovered at an address on Grovehall Parade and the area was promptly sealed off with a temporary cordon as a "precautionary measure", a West Yorkshire Police spokeswoman said.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/west ... 176348.stm
 

rynner2

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#24
Villages to empty after bomb find

More than 1,000 people living in two villages in North Yorkshire are leaving their homes to allow a World War II bomb to be detonated.

The 500lb (227kg) device was found in a field near Ebberston on Sunday by enthusiasts who are excavating a plane which crashed in the area in the 1940s.

Ebberston and nearby Allerston will be evacuated in the afternoon for the bomb to be made safe in a controlled blast.

Police said the primary objective was to ensure the safety of villagers.

An RAF team will be responsible for carrying out the controlled explosion at 1500 BST, police said.

A 300m cordon currently placed around the field where the bomb was found will be extended to more than a kilometre when the detonation takes place.

The nearby A170 will also be closed for a short period.

Leaflets about the evacuation were delivered to Ebberston and Allerston residents on Monday night and buses are being put on to take people to the village hall at Snainton, which is about two miles away.

Animals grazing on fields in the affected area are also being moved.

It is thought the aircraft was a Whitley bomber which was returning to the UK after being hit by flak over Germany.

The pilot and two crew were said to have ejected from the plane before it crashed in the field.

etc...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/nort ... 206474.stm
 

AFCSC

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#25
Unexploded ordinance:

There is a housing development and school built on an old bombing range in Orlando Florida. At least one person has been injured by a explosive device that he found on the school property. An individual that I work with lives in a new house that was built on the old bombing site.
Here are some links:

Construction Halted Near Bombing Range By School
http://www.wesh.com/news/14792180/detail.html

'Top Secret' Orlando Bombing Video Raises Homeowner Safety Questions
http://www.clickorlando.com/news/16091084/detail.html

Bombing range homeowners file lawsuit
Some property owners have learned that they could lose their home insurance.
http://www.sptimes.com/2008/01/15/State ... eown.shtml

Orlando, Fla., homes built atop WWII bombing range
When residents of several neighborhoods near Orlando International Airport go to bed, they wonder what most homeowners don't: Is there a bomb under my house?
http://www.wibw.com/nationalnews/headli ... 47739.html

WWII Bomb Search Expands To Azalea Park
http://www.wesh.com/news/18890283/detail.html

A few miles away is a site that was used to store and test various poision gasses. Houses were built on this site several years ago. The young children have serious health problems.

Orlando Range & Chemical Yard

From 1943 until 1946, the government leased approximately 2,100 acres of land, about 3 miles east of the present Orlando International Airport, Orange County, northwest of Curry Ford Road and South Goldenrod Road (formerly Narcoosee Road). The site housed a post-graduate facility of the Army Air Forces School of Applied Tactics. It served as a training and testing center for the development new tactics and for training personnel in their use.

http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/Divisions ... S/ORCY.htm

Views Of Corps' Chemical Yard Inspection Differ
http://www.wesh.com/news/15960969/detail.html
 

drjbrennan

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#28
Timble2 said:
They found an unexploded motar shell in the river at St Ives, an couple of days ago, Video of them blowing it up, not that impressive....
I think that a generation brought up on video and hollywood explosions have a very different idea of how HE behaves when it detonates.

I have a personal opinion that much of the pyrotechnics on 'Brainiac' are heavily doctored to make them more photogenic.
 

drjbrennan

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