Vampire Books

many_angled_one

Ephemeral Spectre
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#1
Vampires

Just considering writing a book on Vampire legends etc and was wondering what you think would be good & bad in such a book.

I want to know what *you* would like to see in such a book and what would make you buy such a book.

Hell, writing beats my current job!
 
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Anonymous

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#2
Hmmm...well, I really enjoyed the book "Vampires, Burial, and Death" by Paul Barber, which takes a very scientific view of the phenomenon, so I'd like to see more of this in a vampire book, possibly some theories as as to physiology, disease, and so forth. Although the porphyria theory is rather tired and largely disproven, I'm afraid. I'd aslo like to see more folklore in a vampire book- actual local legends and myths, not movie-inspired stuff. I'd be interested to learn what sort of cultural impact the vampire myth had on the societies in which is was known. Also case files on supposed vampire sightings, encounters, etc. I'm getting pretty tired of that old phsycho-babble about sex and death arcetypes...too many vapire books turn into explorations of the human psyche, rather than focus strictly on legend and folklore, or even biology. I'm also pretty tired of hearing about Peter Kurten, quite frankly. A deranged kiler is hardly a vampire myth- just another sad symptom of modern society. But enough of my complaining- good luck to you in your book endeavor! I'll certainly buy a copy. :)
 

many_angled_one

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#3
Following my ideas pretty much here.

I have lots of archived Folklore, sightings, encouters, tales etc

It's going to be more along the lines of Vampires rather than the human social/psycological side of things though there will be a bit about that as well as historical & modern cases of blood drinkers such as Vlad (of course), Elizabeth Bathory etc and a little on fiction, mostly literature, not TV/film.

Medical/phycological aspect of human disease and how it relates to vampirisim as well as how vampires physiology & such might work. Causes of vampirism, types of vampire, burial traditions etc.

How different cultures believed vampires came about, how to ward them off,

Pscho babbble will be ruduced to a bare minimum thank god! :)

And no book would be complete without a vampire hunting guide :) Probably titled, burn the sucker when he's not looking.
 
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Anonymous

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#4
Stick to true psychic vampirism with cases of incubi/succubi attacks. Don't mention Highgate because the truth is far more ghostly.
It's time people got away from the stereotype vampires.
May also be worth mentioned El Chupacabra.
 

DerekH16

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#5
I suspect most publishers would want something on TV/Film vampires (I mean, they'll have to include pics of C. Lee, P. Cushing and lots of half-naked ladies, won't they? ;) )
 
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Anonymous

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#6
Vampire Research

If you are in need of unique material that deals with the vampire as defined in an English dictionary, folklore and theology, you really need to acquaint yourself with "The Vampire: His Kith & Kin" and "The Vampire in Europe" (both by Montague Summers), "The Vampire's Bedside Companion" and "Exorcist!" (both by Peter Underwood), and, last but certainly not least, "The Highgate Vampire", "The Vampire Hunter's Handbook," and "Carmel: A Vampire Tale" (all three books written by Sean Manchester). There are more obscure works from bygone times, but these are largely impossible to get hold of and, in any case, are quoted at length in the aforementioned works that all deal with the true (supernatural) vampire and not psychotic humans who believe they are vampires when they clearly are not. Happy hunting!
 
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Anonymous

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#7
I'd like to see something that doesn't have a bias toward pale faced counts or pop culture. Also something that doesn't just repeat the same old storeis.

The early tales of vampires which occur in some of the early literature concerning witches are truly terrifying.

"...the skin was fresh and ruddy, the nails grown long and evilly crooked, the mouth slobbered with blood from its last night's repast." - eek!
I think the above account of a vampire in Belgrade, 1732 may have been the inspiration for the look of Nosferatu. It's plausable - the guy who did the effects, Albin Grau, certainly had access to a lot of occult literature, being a member of the infamous Fraternitas Saturni.

I think the Malleus Malificarum has a bit about vampires, possibly saying that they are demons which inhabit dead bodies. While it seems in Russia that vampires were traditionally the corpses of wizards...
 

DerekH16

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#8
I'm going to have to re-read 'The Natural History of the Vampire' by Anthony Masters.... lots of 'factual' stuff, local legends, etc., as far as I remember.......

Oh, and pics of Yutte Stensgard, Bela Lugosi, Chris Lee et al. :)
 

lucydru

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#9
As far as I remember Vlad never drank any blood, he just impaled people. Hence Vlad the Impaler!

It's amazing just how much of what you define a vampire comes from the entertainment side of the media!!!
 
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Anonymous

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#11
... and, last but certainly not least, "The Highgate Vampire", "The Vampire Hunter's Handbook," and "Carmel: A Vampire Tale" (all three books written by Sean Manchester).
You are Mr Kolley Kibber. I claim the Daily Messenger prize.

Actually 'Neil' claims it on another thread.
 
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Anonymous

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#12
The Highgate Vampire

Sean Manchester had hoped that the definitive edition of his book about the Highgate case might set the seal on matters as “the last frenzied flutterings of a force so dight with fearful fascination that even legend could not contain it.” Alas, he was obliged to revisit the “haunted ground” once again in his vampirological guide wherein he announced his withdrawal from personal appearances, explaining that his vampire hunting handbook offered a final “opportunity to share with the reader the perils, pitfalls and pernicious scribblings that have confronted” him over the years. He alluded to what might have been his last television appearance. The following year, however, witnessed the appearance of an incomplete book about vampires by self-styled American occultist Leonard Ashley who suggested Manchester was deceased. Ashley had never had any contact or communication with Manchester and relied on the input of others in the USA who had also had no contact. The publishers refused to withdraw copies leaving the now presumed dead Manchester no choice but to exhume himself “should past acquaintances and old comrades become distressed.”

Fortean Times magazine commented that it was apparently “devastated to learn recently of [Manchester’s] passing,” quickly adding that he “had been hunting vampires live on television as recently as January [1999].” Thus the final transmission in the last century of the celebrated exorcist actually occurred in May 1999. Manchester featured at the top of a three hour television programme devoted to his subject for the BBC. It gave the lie to rumours triggered by the malicious Ashley tome.

Fortean Times’ associate editor, Joe McNally, reviewed The Vampire Hunter’s Handbook and described its author as “someone for whom the description ‘larger than life’ seems barely adequate … an imposing figure … Britain’s only full-time vampire hunter.”

McNally added that “there is more to the book than vampire hunting.” Indeed, there is ~ and there is also a great deal more to Seán Manchester than his role as vampirologist par excellence ~ the cause célèbre, on the morning of 27 February 1970 (prompting his declaration: “I awoke and found myself famous”) being the mysterious case of the Highgate Vampire which, at its inception, was to be recorded in The Vampire’s Bedside Companion (Leslie Frewin, 1995; Coronet, 1976). The complete and unexpurgated account was eventually revealed in his best selling The Highgate Vampire (BOS, 1985; revised and updated edition, Gothic Press, 1991). The latter book remains available as a quality hardcover edition.

See: http://www.gothicpress.freeserve.co.uk/Vampire Empire.htm
 
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Anonymous

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#14
Turning Point

"The cause célèbre, on the morning of 27 February 1970 (prompting his declaration: “I awoke and found myself famous”) being the mysterious case of the Highgate Vampire."

I am heartened that "Minor Drag" finds these words reassuring because the celebrity which fell upon Sean Manchester when he awoke to seeing himself splashed across the front page of his morning newsaper was both a blessing and a curse. It allowed those with vital information to make contact, prior to which they had kept their unearthly experiences to themselves, but it also established an enormous responsibility from thereon that would firmly rest on the shoulders of the man leading the investigation.

That Sean Manchester awoke to find himself famous on that particular morning is more than just a factual statement ~ it was of enormous significance to the Highgate investigation, and, moreover, affected the remainder of his life. It was a turning point in both the case and the person who had opened the case.
 
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