Vampires

A

Anonymous

Guest
Re: Vlad the Impaler

Detroit Bob said:
Doesn't most vampire lore trail back to Vlad the Impaler?
Only in as much as a lot of it can be traced back to Bram Stoker's 1897 novel, 'Dracula'.

Stoker apparently based his Dracula and Transylvanian locations on the information he had read in Baedeker travel guidebook about the region.

Vlad Tepes, son of Vlad Dracul (Vlad the Devil, or Dragon), Prince of Wallachia, was a local warlord in the region, back in the mid 15th century. He had a nasty reputation, but it was Stoker that added vampirism to the list.

Stoker was drawing on a gothic horror tradition of vampire tales that went back to 'The Vampyre', written by Lord Byron's physician, Dr Polidori, during the same summer holiday in which Mary Shelley wrote 'Frankenstein' (although her story was much, much better.

Where Polidori's Scottish Highlander, vampyre, 'Lord Ruthven,' was based on Lord Byron's character and reputation, Stoker's vampire seems to have been based on the personality of his boss, the actor-manager, Sir Henry Irving.

There was also an opera about the vampire Highland chieftain, Lord Ruthven 'The Vampire, or The Bride of The Isles' (1829), also based on Polidori's tale.

Then there was Sheridan Le Fanu's 'Carmilla' (1872), that was full of lesbian eroticism, possibly an important influence.

And, let's not forget, Thomas Preskett's, 'Varney the Vampire: Or, the Feast Of Blood' (1847), a hugely successful Gothic, sex 'n' gore, 'penny dreadful' series.

So Vlad The Impaler probably has to take second place to the "mad, bad and dangerous to know" Lord Byron the Impaler.

;)
 

DetroitBob

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Feb 3, 2004
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
17
Wow.........!

Amazing information.

Thank you for posting it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hello,

I believe that 'Dracula' only popularized a very old superstition, amongst a very old group of people, spanning back thousands of years, regarding bloodsucking fiends. Look through any culture and you will see that the lore of the vampyre is very very old. And it spans continents, from Russia to china, Spain to Egypt. People have been talking about Vampires since before anyone popularized them in a book or two, nomatter who wrote about it first.
And...if remains exist, than they can be even older than mankind.


WW
 

Mighty_Emperor

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
Messages
19,443
Reaction score
181
Points
129
The consumptive origins of vampires is discussed here:

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=12494&highlight=vampires

A modern vampire:

Body of 'vampire' dug up

By CLODAGH HARTLEY

A FAMILY dug up the body of a dead relative then cut out and burnt his heart after claiming he was a VAMPIRE.

They also drove wooden stakes through Petre Toma’s body, saying he had drunk their blood at night and cursed them.

Toma’s brother-in-law Gheorghe Marinescu, who lives at Marotinul de Sus in Dracula’s homeland of Romania, said: “If we hadn’t done anything, my wife, son and daughter-in-law would have died.

“I decided to unbury him. I’ve seen these kinds of things before.

“When we took him out of the grave he had blood around his mouth.

“We took his heart and he sighed when we stabbed him. We burned it, then dissolved the ash in water. The people who had fallen sick drank it.

“They got better immediately. It was like someone took away all their pain and sickness.”

The family said the ritual — similar to those in Hammer Horror films starring Christopher Lee — was the only way to free them of the curse of Toma, who died last year aged 76.

Police were last night investigating after another relative complained Toma’s grave had been desecrated.

One cop said: “We will open the grave and see what we find.”
http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2004091714,00.html
 

KeyserXSoze

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 2, 2002
Messages
946
Reaction score
13
Points
49
Strigoi (The Undead Show)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3537085.stm
Death rite unnerves Romanian EU bid
Tom Mulligan
BBC Monitoring

Haunted by "strigoi" - the undead - villagers on the slopes of the Carpathian mountains exhume a corpse from the graveyard and drive a stake through its heart to banish the evil spirit.

They burn the remains of the heart, mix the ashes with water from the local well and drink it, to complete the macabre ritual.

Scenes from a shlock vampire B-movie? No; all this took place in February 2004 at a village in Dolj County, south-western Romania, according to Romanian Antena 1 TV news.

But the "Strigoi Show", as the TV dubbed it light-heartedly, has prompted such a stir about local customs and culture, the national press is questioning whether the ex-communist Balkan country will truly be ready to enter the European Union in 2007.

Under the headline "Ancestral habits at odds with modern European civilization," the independent national daily Evenimentul Zilei commented that such events were the "law of the land" in rural Romania.

Clash of cultures

The regions of Transylvania and Wallachia were "haunted by ancestral ghosts, evil spirits, and vampires"; medieval beliefs that were "at odds with sophisticated EU rules on measuring fruit and the size of bananas".

The paper has been a loud critic of the pace of Prime Minister Adrian Nastase's reforms needed for EU membership, and is quick to highlight criticism of Bucharest from Brussels.

Europe's preoccupations and debates, the paper said, were "totally out of tune with Romanian realities, where local barons make the law, enjoy privileges and export children to get favours from important people" in a "medieval fashion".

It describes Romania as a land of "sold girls" and "Romany kings fighting over gold coins", where pre-Christian faiths endure in spite of "internet cafes opened in villages in the old communist culture houses".

Criticism from Brussels reached a peak last month when the foreign affairs committee of the European Parliament threw a question mark over Bucharest's EU accession talks. MEPs have accused Mr Nastase's government of failing to halt adoptions of children by foreigners, or of putting a stop to bribery and corruption.

Shadows of the past

The national newspaper Ziua ran an editorial headlined "Communist Ghost Haunting Romania" saying Romania was "haunted by the shadows" of its past, particularly the Securitate secret police, which "Europe does not need".

Romanians are flabbergasted only because the EU criticizes such things
Ziua daily
Drawing comparisons between the Dolj County "strigoi" and more recent bloodsuckers, Ziua suggested "the ghost of the Securitate haunts every corner here" and that ghost was "showing its true nature to us: corruption, collectivism, state control, and bureaucracy".

The centrist national daily Adevarul argued the EU would "inevitably be weakened in the short term because it is bringing in the poor countries of the East".

In another column, Ziua commented that Romania was still a county that "sells" its children. It said such events were not even considered newsworthy, as "the monstrous has become an everyday occurrence". Romanians are "flabbergasted only because the EU criticises such things," it said.

But Mr Nastase is taking steps to show his government is heeding EU warnings to push on with radical reforms and not miss its target date of joining by 2007. According to news reports, he is sacking his justice minister after the EU complained of slow judicial reforms.

Smothering local customs?

The authorities took action last September amid an international outcry over the forced wedding of a 12-year old Gypsy bride in Sibiu, Transylvania, the daughter of a self-proclaimed Gypsy king. The media said the child protection agency separated the girl from her teenage groom, who may face charges, and returned her to school.

And Evenimentul Zilei says the government is "enhancing legislation in the field of child adoptions" based on recommendations of the National Authority for Child Protection and Adoptions, although belatedly.

"If we continue to work for our European accession, we will not even be able to beat our wives and children to death anymore," Ziua commented with irony.

Will efforts to ensure human rights, stamp out graft and enhance the legal system to EU standards result in the smothering of the "old Romania": its legends, folklore, its mix of religious and secular traditions?

Romania's metropolitan press may argue that its ancestral customs are out of line with "modern European civilization", but the new Europe may be all the poorer for it if they disappear completely.
 

Stormkhan

Disturbingly familiar
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
4,578
Reaction score
1,640
Points
184
What with stories like this and tales of African "witch-killings", it makes me wonder if all the talk about scientific advances and globalisation is only so much donkey-doo!

Bring back the scolds bridle and ducking stools in major UK towns!
 

Mighty_Emperor

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
Messages
19,443
Reaction score
181
Points
129
A follow up:

Posted on Wed, Mar. 24, 2004

Romanian villagers decry police investigation into vampire slaying

By MATTHEW SCHOFIELD

Knight Ridder Newspapers



MAROTINU DE SUS, Romania - Before Toma Petre's relatives pulled his body from the grave, ripped out his heart, burned it to ashes, mixed it with water and drank it, he hadn't been in the news much.

That's often the way here with vampires. Quiet lives, active deaths.

Villagers here aren't up in arms about the undead - they're pretty common - but they are outraged that the police are involved in a simple vampire slaying. After all, vampire slaying is an accepted, though hidden, bit of national heritage, even if illegal.

"What did we do?" pleaded Flora Marinescu, Petre's sister and the wife of the man accused of re-killing him. "If they're right, he was already dead. If we're right, we killed a vampire and saved three lives. ... Is that so wrong?"

Yes, according to the Romanian State Police. Its view, expressed by Constantin Ghindeano, the chief agent for the region, is that vampires aren't real, and dead bodies in graves aren't to be dug out and killed again, even by relatives.

He doesn't really have much more to say on this case, other than noting that Petre had been removed from his grave, his heart had been cut out and it was presumed to have been consumed by his relatives. Ghindeano added that police were expanding the investigation, which began in mid-January, to include the after-deaths of others in area.

"The investigation is ongoing, and we expect to file charges later," he said, referring to possible charges of disturbing the peace of the dead, which could carry a three-year jail term. "We are determining whether this was an isolated case or whether there is a pattern in the village."

Romania has been filled with news of the vampire-slaying investigation, and villagers admit there's a pattern, but they argue that that's the reason these matters shouldn't make it to court. There's too much of it going on, and too few complain about the practice.

Vampire slaying is a custom that's been passed down from mother to daughter, father to son, for generations beyond memory, not just in this tiny village of 300 huts astride a dirt cart path about 100 miles southwest of Bucharest, but in scores of villages throughout southern Romania.

Little has changed since the days that Turkish invaders rolled through 500 years ago, seeking the mineral riches of Transylvania just to the north. By day, the people are Roman Catholics. At night, they fear the strigoi, or vampires.

On a recent afternoon, the village's single store, which also serves as its lone bar, was filled with men drinking hard, as they explained the vampire facts to a stranger. Most had at least one vampire in their family histories, and many were related to vampire victims. Most had learned to kill a vampire while still children.

Theirs is not a Hollywood tale, and they laugh at Hollywood conventions: that vampires can be warded off by crosses or cloves of garlic, or that they can't be seen in mirrors. Utter nonsense. Vampires were once Catholics, were they not? And if a vampire can be seen, the mirror can see him. And why would you wear garlic around your neck? Are you adding taste?

No, vampires are humans who have died, commonly babies before baptism or people unfortunate enough to have black cats jump over their coffins. Vampires occur everywhere, but in busy cities no one notices, the men said.

Vampires are obvious when dug up because while they will have been laid to rest on their backs, arms folded neatly across their chests, they will be found on their sides or even their stomachs. They will not have decomposed. Beards will have continued to grow. Their arms will be at their sides, as if they are clawing out of their coffins. And they will have blood - sometimes dried, sometimes fresh - around their mouths.

But the biggest tip-off that a vampire is near is his or her family, for vampires always prey on their families. If family members fall ill after a death, odds are a vampire is draining their blood at night, looking for company.

"That's the problem with vampires," said Doru Morinescu, a 30-year-old shepherd who, like many in the village, has a family connection to the current case. "They'd be all right if you could set them after your enemies. But they only kill loved ones. I can understand why, but they have to be stopped."

Ion Balasa, 64, explained that there are two ways to stop a vampire, but only one after he or she has risen to feed.

"Before the burial, you can insert a long sewing needle, just into the bellybutton," he said. "That will stop them from becoming a vampire."

But once they've become vampires, all that's left is to dig them up, use a curved haying sickle to remove the heart, burn the heart to ashes on an iron plate, then have the ill relatives drink the ashes mixed with water.

"The heart of a vampire, while you burn it, will squeak like a mouse and try to escape," Balasa said. "It's best to take a wooden stake and pin it to the pan, so it won't get away."

Which is exactly what happened with Petre, according to Gheorghe Marinescu, a cheery, aging vampire slayer who was Petre's brother-in-law.

Marinescu's story goes like this: After Petre died, Marinescu's son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter fell ill. Marinescu knew the cause was his dead brother-in-law. So he had to go out to the cemetery.

The first time, he was frightened, so he had a little graveside drink, for courage. He ended up with a little too much courage and couldn't use the shovel. So the next night he returned, and with a proper amount of courage, was successful.

Marinescu said he found Petre on his side, his mouth bloody. His heart squeaked and jumped as it was burned. When it was mixed with water and taken to those who were sick, it worked.

His wife, Petre's sister, interrupted his story with a broom, swinging it at him and a stranger. She was worried that he would incur the wrath of the police, who would jail him.

But then his son Costel called what happened next a miracle. After weeks in bed, Costel got up to walk. His head wasn't pounding. His chest wasn't aching. His stomach felt fine.

"We were all saved," he said. "We had been saved from a vampire."

But how could he be sure his illness came from a vampire?

"What other explanation is possible?" he asked.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/8267146.htm
 

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
7,473
Reaction score
2,498
Points
234
If you believe someone has become a vampire, the logical thing is to dig them up and kill them again...whats the fuss?

(as long as they are not making a nasty mess in the cemetry, or putting plastic windmills shaped like flowers on graves....)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hello,

I just don't get it! I really don't. Are people becoming hysterically inferior these days? I am not trying to disrespect any particular culture, but c'mon...corpses on their sides. If you are buried in a box in some country that still believes in vampires, chances are A) they probably level you into your grave on ropes, in which case B) your body would probably be tousled around, so in effect C) I doubt whether any of the corpses are on their backs.
I am not saying I DON'T believe in Vampyres...but I am saying this is not enough evidence. Sounds to me like some people are holding on to whatever is left of a very old tradition.
And just to validate the existence of vampyres, I have heard accounts in which vampyres are rarely buried. They arise from the dead, sometimes right at the morgue, prior to burial AND they supposedly hop around like SPRING HEELED JACK! This is the type of vampyre I believe in, not some misbegotten family member whose corpse has been abused by poor burial practices!!!

WW
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Superstitious Twaddle

A vampire as a supernatural being is superstitious twaddle. A vampire or vampyre as someone embracing, however superficially or extremely, a lifestyle choice of draining energy or blood from "donors" -- or even a psychotic going around slashing people to "feed", is all that's left. No one does that from a grave.

Further, if these peasants believe the thing magically comes out of the grave to feed on them, why would they think digging it up and "killing" the dead body would help?

Sorry, but this is just sad, sick stuff here. And yes, people do seem generally to be regressing to peasant superstitions -- look at the rise in fundamentalism of every kind.

Maybe Earth sweeps through a Stupidity Zone every few hundred years.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Or perhaps the way we live our lives somehow leaves us unfullfilled and looking for something to believe in??
 

TheOrigDesperado

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 30, 2002
Messages
590
Reaction score
13
Points
49
How do they get out of their graves? And more to the point, why do they go back?

I'd rather be dead proper than spend all eternity in a grave, growing my hair.
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Existential Angst

Lulumanwoman said:
Or perhaps the way we live our lives somehow leaves us unfullfilled and looking for something to believe in??
That's a rather trite and old argument these days, with much truth to it, depending on each individual's response to modern times. I don't want to have to believe, I want to KNOW.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
the trouble with vampires

The trouble with the vampire thing is, if vampires actually lived in their coffins during the day and got up at night to bite people someone would soon notice the graveyard looking a bit untidy. If the vampire then went roaming round to look for someone to bite, and that person then became a vampire--someone would surely notice

a) an unexpected decline or death

b) so a post mortem wold be needed and then

c) someone would notice the bite marks of the person's neck like the doctor or the coroner.



The vampire victim, if it was buried would then turn into a vampire so instead of having one vampire roaming round you now have two which soon turns into four. The entire community would soon be decimated, except those who were cremated would presumably excape the vampire curse( would they go to heaven--or hell?)

Also, how can a victim of a vampire be classified as an evil being when they might have been perfectly nice before they got bitten. I heard a story about a vicar who got bitten by a vampire and died

Have you read the Vampire Watchers handbook?

Encouraging people to go lurking and s kulking in graveyards with a sharply pointed stake is very dangerous, it could lead to some innocent person like a drunken tramp getting murdered by accident.

So I don't think the idea of undead coffin dwelling vampires really makes sense.


I only know of three vampire stories anyway--Highgate,Kirklees and Croglin. Does anyone know of any more ?

barbara
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
More Sucking Stories

Yes, there are thousands of such anecdotes and spook stories across the Balkans especially, but in every culture to a degree. Most vampire stories are meant as instructive myths, though, and not to be taken literally.

As for actions such extreme beliefs can lead to, well, murder isn't out of the question at all, as the Highgate Loon proved. Covering things up with claims of vampirism is a bit whacked, too, though, so who knows?

Croglin's a spooky one, great story, got all the elements, too bad Doyle never wrote that one up as a novel as he did with the Hound of the Baskervilles.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I find the folklore and traditions of the Vampire (that is, other people's folklore etc, not the vampire's own! ;) ) fascinating. Vampires have been lots of different things over the centuries, and an actual creature called Vampire is only one of them.

For instance -

Vampires rising don't mess up the cemetary. They rise through a small hole in the gravestone, like smoke, before materialising. That is, if it's the kind of vampire you can see.

Being bitten by a vampire doesn't necessarily make you one. Nor does it kill you necessarily. It does cause excessive lethargy.

Lots of things can make you a vampire. A cat's shadow falling on the corpse; a cawl at birth; even having blue eyes!

There's lots of way to kill a vampire. My personal favourite is the practice of stuffing a lemon in the alleged vampire's mouth!

As for digging up corpses and preventing them 'coming back' :rolleyes: I rather suspect that this was a slow news day for the media, so they picked up on it. It probably happens fairly regularly. The slightest hint of an illness sweeping through a community would have them reaching for the garlic (and I do believe it's only the garlic flowers that work - not the garlic bulbs - but I can't remember where I got that idea from).

Still, you wouldn't catch me inviting strangers over the threshold, or having a 'Welcome' mat. ;) I'm not pushing my luck! Traditions like these have been around a hell of a lot longer than me!! :D
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Never Fear

I only bite with permission, and then only lightly.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
This is probably something off topic, so I apologise.

I remember always being terrified by vampires. So much so, that I still only feel comfortable sometimes with the duvet up under my chin. Now, why is it that things which I'm pretty sure don't exist have the power to scare me absolutely rigid at night? Rationally, I know that Evil will exist in daylight as much as night-time. So why do we seem to have this instinctive, primitive fear of the dark? Irrational fear of the dark, I might add - in that I'm not worried about being eaten by a bear at night, but a nightmare about zombies will have me up all night with the light on reading a book.
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Embodiment

I'd guess we have fears that hook into our primal, primitive limbic system, and the dark evokes many of them. Some won't even have names. Then we clothe them in certain comprehensible guises, such as vampires.

Far from being off-topic, I'd say it goes to the heart of why we have invented such creatures. Giving a form to a fear allows us to begin mythologizing it, and thus handling it. Leaving it formless keeps it beyond any control, even if that control is only fictional.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Still, when you get right down to it, what is there about the dark to fear? :confused:

You can tell this is one of those existential questions that's kept me awake at night, can't you? well, actually, the half-awake, half-blind notion that the clothes horse is some looming figure come to haunt me kept me awake, but you have to have something to think about, don't you?

It's like those ridiculous stories that did the rounds about a year ago about 'Black Eyed Children'. A more obvious UL type horror story I haven't heard since the Claw Hanging on the Bumper, and yet if I think about it, it still scares me today. Even though I'm certain it's fiction.

When I go into the kitchen, I look out onto an unlit pathway through the houses. And three motorbikes. And yet there's always always the fear that I'll see something else

Eldritch howl supplied for dramatic effect....:D


edit Oh, by the way, I agree completely. We formed our fears and gave them names. It's just sometimes, deep down, I wonder whether by naming them, anthropomorphesising (is that a word? Or can I just not spell?) them, we may, just may, have actually given them life (of sorts)
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
32,740
Reaction score
40,567
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
Darkness is transforming, it hides things. how many times have you seen a figure standing behind a door in the gloom only for it to resolve into a dressing gown or coat.
Back in the past, when the circle of light cast by a fire was the only protection to be had from the wild beasts. you couldn't be sure if the eyes out there were those of a jackal or a lion or maybe something worse.

I'm sure that fear of the dark is mentioned in 'Hogfather' by T. Pratchett.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I can understand the fear of something out there, in that it might be bigger than you, have sharper teeth, and not have eaten recently. I just wonder why we piled our fear of the unknown into the dark. Why can't we be just as scared in daylight? Why do programmes like Most Haunted insist on that ridiculous night lens, as though ghosts will only appear in pitch black?

There's no real answer, other than the primitive thing; I know. But despite my mom's constant assurances as a child that if it's not there when the light's on, it's not there when the light's off, I still have a fear of the dark. It's quite embarrassing. Although it may be more to do with being claustrophobic - but then again, which came first? I find darkness incredibly claustrophobic, as does my mom, yet oddly enough I wasn't aware of her phobia until I already had mine.

I don't think it's helped by being blind as a bat without my glasses. And it's funny you mention the dressing gown on the back of the door - my mom used to know a song about a boy who spent all night wide awake in terror at the hulking shape by the bedroom door, preventing him from leaving - until the dawn light revealed it to be the dressing gown! My mom used it as a salutary lesson that if you hear or see something that you don't know what it is, go and investigate - otherwise you'll just scare yourself silly wondering what it is.

Anyway, I'm rambling again. :D
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Fear of Dark

Fear of the dark is a misnomer. We're afraid of what may be hidden by the dark. We're made uneasy by our main sense, that of sight, being so greatly diminished by the dark. We fear, frankly, that something unseen, unobserved, maybe even unthought-of, is creeping up on us and will pounce at any instant.

Atavistic fears, as I say, from the bad old days.

Helen, I don't know what stories you mean when you say "black-eyed children" but for some reason it put me instantly in mind of John Wyndham's excellent novel The Midwich Cuckoos. Yikes. Then there is John Brunner's superb Children of the Thunder.

Anyway, consider the fact that innocents and pure hearts fear the dark while the nefarious and scurvy embrace it.

Character test, sort of.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Not sure about the innocent bit!!

Ah well, that may have answered part of my query, at least as it relates to my personal circumstances. I find the dark stifling. It feels like a blanket over my face, unless I can make out shapes. So we have to have some kind of light on in the house, to filter through into the bedroom. That, and it stops us tripping over the cats when we get up in the night. ;)

So perhaps my particular fear is, at least partly, claustrophobia related.

I think there was a thread about the Black Eyed Children. I don't want to think about it now! :eek!!!!:


Here it is

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=11131&highlight=black+eyed+kids
 
F

FraterLibre

Guest
Vignette

In my capacity as editor I'd reject that as not a story but a vignette. Needs a second and third act.

As a writer, I'd confess I've written many such tales. They're fun, as is the urban legend tone. A couple can be found on my website, one's called "Nawlin's Shout".

As a person I'd say that we've all felt at least a qualm, if not intimidation, from small groups of kids who seem somehow menacing or threatening or even vaguely uncanny. I'd suggest that's the part of the story that hooks us and may be what's scary about it to you.

Other than touching those atavistic nerves we've discussed I'd say it's a lame opening to a hint-wink-nudge update of vampires.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
the dark night of the soul

Ever read St John of the Cross?

I never sleep in the dark so I can't be a vampire, though I do work nights! But I never draw the curtains, in fact I have none in my bedroom which overlooks greenfields fortunately!! Whe not on nights I leave my bedroom door open and the landing light on. There's nothing more scarier than pitch dark.

Darkness/blackness in a strange concept, it may be tied up with racism I suppose, you know, the black arts, white magic--when you think about it its a very sort of primitive divide.

Forunately animals don't have these problems, except from a human perpective. I have several cats, including my all black one called Sabbath. HMMM.

My dog is all black also, but there seems to be less suspicion attached to black dogs than black cats. Though isn't black dog supposed to be another name for depression??
You could think of lots more connections--black looks, black hearted, blacklisted and so on--well, what were we saying about vampires? I've forgotten!

Barbara


Beautiful Young Damsel
 

TheOrigDesperado

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 30, 2002
Messages
590
Reaction score
13
Points
49
I'd say the use of "black" to mean "evil" is simply the absence of light, inferring God's light (i.e. God's love). Hence darkness. Fear of the dark (as mentioned earlier) is a natural reaction to not being able to see surrounding dangers. I don't think it has anything to do with racism - after all, racism is at least equal black / white as white / black.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I have no idea if this is any help at all, but darkness is often a psychological thing, you can banish feelings of depression/evil simply by putting lights on. In recent times research into the illness that is triggered by dark nights (can't remember the medical name for it, have been in the pub all afternoon) found that patients could be helped by putting a lighted screen in their rooms. The racism thing is completely off-kilter as far as I can see.
 

TheOrigDesperado

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 30, 2002
Messages
590
Reaction score
13
Points
49
research into the illness that is triggered by dark nights (can't remember the medical name for it, have been in the pub all afternoon)
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), I believe.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Seasonal affective disorder!!! Of course! And don't forget the effects of our good old circadian rhythms.

When our whole system feels at a low ebb and we're just too tired to focus properly this usually occurs during the dark hours. No wonder the darkness is seen as somehow an ideal setting for weirdness! What can be weirder than dreams? The sleep of reason begets monsters!!

And don't you forget it!!! :cross eye
 
Top