Voyager Is 30!

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
12,468
Likes
14,046
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
#61
Whenever I think of this, I also feel a little sad for it... out there all on its own, leaving the Solar System and heading into the unknown...
I prefer to think of it as 'heading out AS an unknown' ...

Our species' Voyager could eventually become some other species' Oumuamua.
 

Ermintruder

Delineated by a professional cryptozoologist
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,249
Likes
6,887
Points
284
#65
Curious. Unless it's just me....

The almost-live data from Voyager 1 and 2...

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status

My reading of it is that they're both showing as getting >closer< to Earth....which makes no sense whatsoever. They're meant to be interstellar, heading away from us at 38,000 miles-per-hour.

At 0341UTC this morning (Sun 3 Mar 2019) the distance from Earth for Voyager 1 was 13,481,932,956....just ten minutes later, that had reduced to 13,481,922,095, that is
10,861 miles closer.....and travelling home at a speed of nearly 66,000 miles an hour!!!

What gives? Has somebody (or something) sent them back?

2019-03-03 04.03.48.png
2019-03-03 04.04.27.png
 

blessmycottonsocks

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
3,101
Likes
4,439
Points
154
Location
Wessex and Mercia
#66
Curious. Unless it's just me....

The almost-live data from Voyager 1 and 2...

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status

My reading of it is that they're both showing as getting >closer< to Earth....which makes no sense whatsoever. They're meant to be interstellar, heading away from us at 38,000 miles-per-hour.

At 0341UTC this morning (Sun 3 Mar 2019) the distance from Earth for Voyager 1 was 13,481,932,956....just ten minutes later, that had reduced to 13,481,922,095, that is
10,861 miles closer.....and travelling home at a speed of nearly 66,000 miles an hour!!!

What gives? Has somebody (or something) sent them back?

View attachment 15362
View attachment 15363
It's coming home, it's coming home. Voyager's coming home!

...... or, it's that time of the year when Earth's orbit brings us temporarily closer to Voyager.
The distance from Sol is a better measure (which is also why Voyager's velocity is given from Sol, not Earth) and that is increasing steadily.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/space/satellites/a26118/voyager-1-and-earth-get-closertemporarily/
 

Bigphoot2

Not sprouts! I hate sprouts.
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
6,220
Likes
15,149
Points
294
#68
Still boldly going...
A New Plan for Keeping NASA's Oldest Explorers Going
This artist's concept depicts one of NASA's Voyager spacecraft, including the location of the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) instrument. Both Voyagers launched with operating CRS instruments. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Unannotated version
UPDATED on July 12, 2019: Voyager 2 successfully fired up its trajectory correction maneuver thrusters on July 8, 2019, and will be using them to control the pointing of the spacecraft for the foreseeable future. Voyager 2 last used those thrusters during its encounter with Neptune in 1989. The spacecraft's aging attitude control thrusters have been experiencing degradation that required them to fire an increasing and untenable number of pulses to keep the spacecraft's antenna pointed at Earth. Voyager 1 switched to its trajectory correction maneuver thrusters for the same reason in January 2018.
With careful planning and dashes of creativity, engineers have been able to keep NASA's Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft flying for nearly 42 years - longer than any other spacecraft in history. To ensure that these vintage robots continue to return the best science data possible from the frontiers of space, mission engineers are implementing a new plan to manage them. And that involves making difficult choices, particularly about instruments and thrusters.
One key issue is that both Voyagers, launched in 1977, have less and less power available over time to run their science instruments and the heaters that keep them warm in the coldness of deep space. Engineers have had to decide what parts get power and what parts have to be turned off on both spacecraft. But those decisions must be made sooner for Voyager 2 than Voyager 1 because Voyager 2 has one more science instrument collecting data - and drawing power - than its sibling.
etc
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news....bY7SFe7gCMOrSbpeg2frQc03GCMwqv9wABUo28_CROsdA
 
Top