Weird Names

GerdaWordyer

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My parents lived on an oddly literary cul-de-sac, only ten houses. It wasn't unusual to grow up next to a kid named Elizabeth Bennet, because neither name is uncommon, but when the family with a little boy moved across the street, we remarked on that cute little blond mop-head, Jacob Marley.
 

Yithian

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I think this article might be appropriate.

I was really excited when it came to naming my daughter. She has a traditional christian name, an unusual middle name, and a nickname from birth. A couple of weeks after my wife's announcement we had those and a corresponding set of names all ready to roll in case she had turned out to be a little boy. We gave both a lot of thought, playing with variations, experimenting with abbreviations, changing orders, one in seven seems like a pretty big number of parents to have made a mistake!

One in seven parents admit they made a 'terrible mistake' with the name they chose for their child, according to a study.
Researchers found despite 'loving' the moniker at the time, millions of mums and dads soon grew to dislike it.
Amazingly, 28 per cent of people have even told their child that they regret choosing their name, and more than one in ten said their children have told them they don't like it themselves.
One in five dislike the fact their chosen name has become too common, while nearly one in 10 were put off thanks to a celebrity choosing it for their own child.
Another one in 10 started to regret the name after someone with the same moniker went onto become famous.
[...]
The study of 2,000 parents found one in three of those who regret their child's name tried to choose something which was unique, but now can't venture to the park without bumping into hordes of other youngsters with the same name.
It also emerged one in 20 parents call their child something different to the name on their birth certificate because they no longer like it.
And 14 per cent have even considered officially changing their child's name.
It also emerged one in two parents would be put off a name if a celebrity chose it for their child, with half saying they wouldn't choose Bear, the name picked by Cheryl Cole and Liam Payne for their son.

Source (lots of examples of which celebrities the public dislike):
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20..._source=LI&li_medium=li-recommendation-widget
 

Lord Lucan

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I think this article might be appropriate.

I was really excited when it came to naming my daughter. She has a traditional christian name, an unusual middle name, and a nickname from birth. A couple of weeks after my wife's announcement we had those and a corresponding set of names all ready to roll in case she had turned out to be a little boy. We gave both a lot of thought, playing with variations, experimenting with abbreviations, changing orders, one in seven seems like a pretty big number of parents to have made a mistake!

One in seven parents admit they made a 'terrible mistake' with the name they chose for their child, according to a study.
Researchers found despite 'loving' the moniker at the time, millions of mums and dads soon grew to dislike it.
Amazingly, 28 per cent of people have even told their child that they regret choosing their name, and more than one in ten said their children have told them they don't like it themselves.
One in five dislike the fact their chosen name has become too common, while nearly one in 10 were put off thanks to a celebrity choosing it for their own child.
Another one in 10 started to regret the name after someone with the same moniker went onto become famous.
[...]
The study of 2,000 parents found one in three of those who regret their child's name tried to choose something which was unique, but now can't venture to the park without bumping into hordes of other youngsters with the same name.
It also emerged one in 20 parents call their child something different to the name on their birth certificate because they no longer like it.
And 14 per cent have even considered officially changing their child's name.
It also emerged one in two parents would be put off a name if a celebrity chose it for their child, with half saying they wouldn't choose Bear, the name picked by Cheryl Cole and Liam Payne for their son.

Source (lots of examples of which celebrities the public dislike):
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20..._source=LI&li_medium=li-recommendation-widget
Surely naming your children is one of the most important responsibilities a parent has.
 

GerdaWordyer

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My brother and SIL don't regret naming their daughter Brittany and their beagle Bella, but they're mildly irritated that people might think they were influenced by noxious celebrity in that Brittany Spears and "Twilight" novels became trendy very soon after.
 

Lord Lucan

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I see from the latest FT that the Vice President of The University of London Law Society is one Tuna Kunt. Says she's heard all the jokes and... you know, I bet she has, too. Her name is Turkish in origin.
Yes, that is rather unfortunate. Could you imagine being introduced to her for the first time and being caught unawares?
 

maximus otter

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Beezow Doo-Doo Zopittybop-Bop-Bop, 34, was taken into custody on Sunday after allegedly attacking police officers at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington.

He is accused of biting, punching, throwing rocks, grabbing an officer's handcuff case and hitting him in the head with it, trying to stab a cop with a pen and running off several times despite being shot with a stun gun, the Tri-City Herald reported.

Zopittybop-Bop-Bop, who legally changed his name from Jeffrey Wilschke in 2011, has had several brushes with the law.

Beezow explained that his first name represents “the explosion of awareness of the interconnectedness of the infinite love in the universe.” Doo-doo “is the struggle of our daily lives with that awareness, that with love comes chaos,” and Zopittybop-bop-bop “is the outcome of that struggle, which is often ironic, especially because all life ends in death.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/en...p-bop-bop-arrested_n_56b1b6aae4b01d80b2448897

maximus otter
 

Lord Lucan

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Beezow Doo-Doo Zopittybop-Bop-Bop, 34, was taken into custody on Sunday after allegedly attacking police officers at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington.

He is accused of biting, punching, throwing rocks, grabbing an officer's handcuff case and hitting him in the head with it, trying to stab a cop with a pen and running off several times despite being shot with a stun gun, the Tri-City Herald reported.

Zopittybop-Bop-Bop, who legally changed his name from Jeffrey Wilschke in 2011, has had several brushes with the law.

Beezow explained that his first name represents “the explosion of awareness of the interconnectedness of the infinite love in the universe.” Doo-doo “is the struggle of our daily lives with that awareness, that with love comes chaos,” and Zopittybop-bop-bop “is the outcome of that struggle, which is often ironic, especially because all life ends in death.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/en...p-bop-bop-arrested_n_56b1b6aae4b01d80b2448897

maximus otter
Jeffrey Wilschke, can't blame the guy for changing his name.
 

EnolaGaia

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Dr Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck??
And, no, she didn't change it to that. ...
Her expressed attitude at this stage of her life:

Today, she is proud to call herself Dr. Marijuana Pepsi. In a way, she thanks her mother, and she admits her name may have given her a sense of resilience.
... resonates with the eventually revealed explanation in Johnny Cash's "A Boy Named Sue."
 

OneWingedBird

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Anal not allowed in court!

Lord Justice Coulson said former solicitor Anal Sheikh, who was struck off the roll for dishonesty in 2009, had 'habitually and persistently’ instituted proceedings and made applications to the court. Judges have regularly complained about the groundless basis for her claims and the court heard six examples where proceedings were certified ‘totally without merit’.
https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/law/vexatious-ex-solicitor-barred-from-any-court-proceedings/5070672.article#.XQvpcFGCVqI.twitter[Law Gazette[/url
 

James_H

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Names not changed to protect the innocent, because it would defeat the point of the story.
More classic Hong Kong English names.

I have a student named Riff (as in 'guitar riff', I guess). We were talking in class about parents' names. He says 'My daddy's name is Fox'. The local teacher started crowing with laughter, saying 'what kind of name is "Fox"?' (she's obviously not a fan of the X-Files). I asked her what her English name was (I only know her as 'Ms. Cheung'). She came over sheepish and said she never told anyone. 'Oh go on,' I said. Her name is Pinky.
 
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