Weird Weather

skinny

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34C and high hot north winds at gale force here today. We were going to go to the beach, but raised dust and gusty waters will put paid to that. Today will be 12C above the monthly average. The heat is getting tiresome. Severe fire danger all week means the Easter camping families can't light their obligatory campfires. There'll be some disgruntlement about that, and hopefully nobody causes a wildfire.

Even weirder, snow in WA on the same weekend. The Stirling Range hasn't seen snow for 50 years. This is the earliest snow ever in that part of the world.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-20/snow-in-albany-western-australia-record/11032616
 

CarlosTheDJ

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My uncle lives in Ottawa and they are suffering horrendous floods at the moment - seems to have been largely ignored by UK news.


Severe spring flooding that has forced thousands of residents from their homes in Canada's eastern half refuses to let up in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick.

Environment Canada has issued heavy rainfall warnings and special weather statements — with a mess of rain, sleet, snow and ice pellets possible across a wide section of the flood zones starting Tuesday night and continuing Wednesday.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said at a news conference in Ottawa Tuesday that there are now 2,600 Canadian Forces personnel deployed across the three provinces, with more on standby. He said about 1,000 of those are in Quebec.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/flooding-impact-ontario-quebec-nb-1.5116376
 

Sharon Hill

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More like a weird way of getting a weather forecast, the amateur trumps the professionals. This presents a number of issues: the lack of personalization of the media, the distrust in authority, the need for instant news and information, and maybe just the thirst for novelty.
https://theoutline.com/post/7546/snowfreak-the-mysterious-amateur-taking-weather-reports-by-storm

The SnowFreak, who closely guards his true identity, recognized a natural deficiency in the way we've traditionally reported the weather. A TV meteorologist most closely mimics his service, where a specialist who is historically familiar with the region is interpreting weather patterns (contrast with a more broad, automatic service like weather.com, which tends to be less accurate). But the meteorologist gets five minutes on a 30-minute local news broadcast. All the data they have needs to be synthesized into that moment. If a disruption in their model surfaces a few minutes after the station pivots into The Tonight Show, there is no machinery to get the word out to the public. In our climate change times, when weather is becoming increasingly volatile, both the newish weather apps that rely exclusively on statistics and mathematical models and the old scheduled meteorology broadcasts are ill-adapted to the frequency and severity of the weather changes we now face.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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Even weirder, snow in WA on the same weekend. The Stirling Range hasn't seen snow for 50 years. This is the earliest snow ever in that part of the world.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-20/snow-in-albany-western-australia-record/11032616
Beautiful pictures in that link. I heard about the early snowfall on ABC Sydney, and I have to admit to being initially surprised at the concept of snow in Australia :sorry: (I learn new stuff every day :) ), and they were talking about the skiing. Also; I think they referred to them as "the Snowy Mountains" a lot, as opposed to the Stirling Range - is this the same set of mountains they would have been talking about?


For the first time in history of weather forecasts in Norway: Tornado warning for Southern Norway, tomorrow June 6th.
Wow... did the tornado materialise?
 

skinny

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a specialist who is historically familiar with the region is interpreting weather patterns
That's good. I suspect some of these 'unprecedented weather conditions' reported in the past few years will be remembered quite clearly to have happened similarly in 1978 or 1991 by those same old timers. The reporting and forecasting of weather has become very statistic-heavy since the digital revolution, and it certainly makes for a lot of overblown dramatic response across social media and the like. Human perception of what weather even is has altered greatly in that time. I'm much more in tune with seasonal change having been outdoors at night as often as possible over the past 7 or so years. I've become far more cognisant of the planetary context this way, and weather cycles become fairly routine when you get that cosmic perspective in mind. Rare events are interesting but in no way worrying, to me anyway.

I do wonder at times what the warming trend is doing to general human physiology, if anything. The perceived increase in flu virus casualties this year locally has the chicken littles scurrying about claiming we're more at risk of a disease apocalypse any day now - usually the same people who refuse to immunise their children. Go figure.

edit; Asimov's Heliconia trilogy, part 3, has a team of earth scientists stationed in orbit above a primitive society on a distant planet observing their rapid physiological alteration as their binary solar seasons clunk over. In that third story, the inhabitants who are rich, wealthy and fat succumb inevitably to The Fat Death, whereby most perish, but the few who survive are so physically diminished that they remain gaunt for the remainder of their lives, initiating a return to the dark age story one (Helliconia Spring) emerges out of. Fantastic story of cyclic generational change and adaptation of both physiology and mythology. Might be relevant to our current concerns about the warming trend.

Helliconia: Fall
 
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skinny

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Beautiful pictures in that link. I heard about the early snowfall on ABC Sydney, and I have to admit to being initially surprised at the concept of snow in Australia :sorry: (I learn new stuff every day :) ), and they were talking about the skiing. Also; I think they referred to them as "the Snowy Mountains" a lot, as opposed to the Stirling Range - is this the same set of mountains they would have been talking about?
The Stirling Range is south of Perth, Western Australia. It is beautiful. I am very keen to camp out there for a week or two.
The Snowy Mountains are in the Great Dividing Range south-west of Sydney on the opposite side of the continent. The Snowies get snow annually. There's a vast band of mountains from around Canberra to just north-east of Melbourne which experience heavy annual snowfall.

I've never been skiing, but my first experience of snow was on a family daytrip to Mt Kosciusko in 1980. While we were at the mountain, it was chilly but nothing fell. We took some dismal snaps of a patch of greywhite high up on top, but on the highway back to Canberra it started to snow properly. We got out to have a bit of fun. I recall wondering why I couldn't hear anything. The only precipitation I'd experienced previously was rain and hail. Fresh snow is a wonder. The first time I truly got into the deep snow experience was in Korea at the turn of the century. The heavy snow in January that season was the most the city had seen for 30 years. It was a pleasure to crunch through fresh snowfall and to hear it lightly pattering into mounds on my shoulders. Only a week later I was cursing the grubby car-packed ice slicks that developed on the roads. I slipped on my arse more than once. Hate that icy aftermath.
 

Mungoman

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That's good. I suspect some of these 'unprecedented weather conditions' reported in the past few years will be remembered quite clearly to have happened similarly in 1978 or 1991 by those same old timers. The reporting and forecasting of weather has become very statistic-heavy since the digital revolution, and it certainly makes for a lot of overblown dramatic response across social media and the like. Human perception of what weather even is has altered greatly in that time. I'm much more in tune with seasonal change having been outdoors at night as often as possible over the past 7 or so years. I've become far more cognisant of the planetary context this way, and weather cycles become fairly routine when you get that cosmic perspective in mind. Rare events are interesting but in no way worrying, to me anyway.

I do wonder at times what the warming trend is doing to general human physiology, if anything. The perceived increase in flu virus casualties this year locally has the chicken littles scurrying about claiming we're more at risk of a disease apocalypse any day now - usually the same people who refuse to immunise their children. Go figure.

edit; Asimov's Heliconia trilogy, part 3, has a team of earth scientists stationed in orbit above a primitive society on a distant planet observing their rapid physiological alteration as their binary solar seasons clunk over. In that third story, the inhabitants who are rich, wealthy and fat succumb inevitably to The Fat Death, whereby most perish, but the few who survive are so physically diminished that they remain gaunt for the remainder of their lives, initiating a return to the dark age story one (Helliconia Spring) emerges out of. Fantastic story of cyclic generational change and adaptation of both physiology and mythology. Might be relevant to our current concerns about the warming trend.

Helliconia: Fall
A brilliant set of books Skinny.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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I suspect some of these 'unprecedented weather conditions' reported in the past few years will be remembered quite clearly to have happened similarly in 1978 or 1991 by those same old timers. The reporting and forecasting of weather has become very statistic-heavy since the digital revolution, and it certainly makes for a lot of overblown dramatic response across social media and the like. Human perception of what weather even is has altered greatly in that time. I'm much more in tune with seasonal change having been outdoors at night as often as possible over the past 7 or so years. I've become far more cognisant of the planetary context this way, and weather cycles become fairly routine when you get that cosmic perspective in mind. Rare events are interesting but in no way worrying, to me anyway.

:agree:
 

Mungoman

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Noting personal Zebra, but ...



INT21 ;)
A lot of people have experienced various magnitudes and types of weather over their allotted time on this Planet INT21, and some people have sat down and questioned this insistence on anthropological origins.

To lay the blame on humanity, rather than industry, indicates to me a type of Stockholm syndrome that a large number of our populace has welcomed. We have had, until now, little choice in what is used in construction of homes, highways, factories, Highway systems, transport, and the fuels that have been required for this outcome.

We all agree that among other things, CO2 is a byproduct of all these products processes.

I'd like to point out the obvious and indicate that CO2 is 0.0412% of the atmosphere, and that it isn't any toxicity or harmful effect of CO2 that is altering our climate.

It is what it, and the effect that many other compounds have on normal radiation from our Star that is causing the problem.

This effect is causing our oceans and atmosphere to heat up. Luckily, our atmosphere can rid itself of 52% of that ambient heat, but, our oceans can't - It can only rid itself of 12% of Its ambient heat, and our oceans are responsible for our weather/climate.

Now, having come this far, I would like to indicate that I do acknowledge that the climate is changing, But I cannot accept that CO2 is the boogieman that some organisations and some people would have us believe.

I know that over the last century, our oceans have been progressively warming, that we have been tipping uncountable types of shite into them, and that because our oceans are vast, we don't see the effect that our rubbish has.

Our Governments are a little vague with that...

While our governments have been dedicated to CO2, and have been levying and taxing us, because industry will pass that sort of thing on...the oceans, which supply us with 75% of our renewable oxygen have been warming, have been dying, have been retaining heat which has reached our poles, which has altered our climate and weather, and which has been expanding due to waters penchant for that sort of thing and flooding low lying areas, causing biggest mobs of people to seek refuge elsewhere.

I, rather cynically believe that CO2, for certain people, is a nice little earner, and that is why the focus on CO2, rather than a dire need to focus on our Magnificent Oceans and Seas.

Your opinion may vary.
 

maximus otter

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For both April and April-May-June, long-range prediction systems show small, but consistent signals, of an increase in the likelihood of high pressure. At this time of year, high pressure is usually associated with warmer-than-average weather. This, along with the tendency for higher UK temperatures seen in the last 10 years, leads to an increased chance of warmer-than-average conditions’.

https://blog.metoffice.gov.uk/2019/03/26/will-we-see-a-record-breaking-spring/

"UK weather forecast: Danger to life warning issued as ferocious storms batter Britain."

https://www.express.co.uk/news/weat...-office-amber-warning-rain-flooding-june-2019

"There are no signs of summer arriving in Greater Manchester yet - with even more rain to come on Saturday. Forecasters at the Met Office have said temperatures will remain cool until the weekend."

https://www.manchestereveningnews.c.../manchester-weather-rain-summer-cold-16422885

"The Environment Secretary, Michael Gove, has today announced how the UK’s climate and weather could change over the next century, and the report is quite concerning.

Using science from the Met Office..."

https://www.countryliving.com/uk/wi...limate-change-over-next-100-years-met-office/

:rofl2:

maximus otter
 
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Mythopoeika

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A lot of people have experienced various magnitudes and types of weather over their allotted time on this Planet INT21, and some people have sat down and questioned this insistence on anthropological origins.

To lay the blame on humanity, rather than industry, indicates to me a type of Stockholm syndrome that a large number of our populace has welcomed. We have had, until now, little choice in what is used in construction of homes, highways, factories, Highway systems, transport, and the fuels that have been required for this outcome.

We all agree that among other things, CO2 is a byproduct of all these products processes.

I'd like to point out the obvious and indicate that CO2 is 0.0412% of the atmosphere, and that it isn't any toxicity or harmful effect of CO2 that is altering our climate.

It is what it, and the effect that many other compounds have on normal radiation from our Star that is causing the problem.

This effect is causing our oceans and atmosphere to heat up. Luckily, our atmosphere can rid itself of 52% of that ambient heat, but, our oceans can't - It can only rid itself of 12% of Its ambient heat, and our oceans are responsible for our weather/climate.

Now, having come this far, I would like to indicate that I do acknowledge that the climate is changing, But I cannot accept that CO2 is the boogieman that some organisations and some people would have us believe.

I know that over the last century, our oceans have been progressively warming, that we have been tipping uncountable types of shite into them, and that because our oceans are vast, we don't see the effect that our rubbish has.

Our Governments are a little vague with that...

While our governments have been dedicated to CO2, and have been levying and taxing us, because industry will pass that sort of thing on...the oceans, which supply us with 75% of our renewable oxygen have been warming, have been dying, have been retaining heat which has reached our poles, which has altered our climate and weather, and which has been expanding due to waters penchant for that sort of thing and flooding low lying areas, causing biggest mobs of people to seek refuge elsewhere.

I, rather cynically believe that CO2, for certain people, is a nice little earner, and that is why the focus on CO2, rather than a dire need to focus on our Magnificent Oceans and Seas.

Your opinion may vary.
Yes. Carbon trading seems to have been invented as yet another money market. Someone is doing nicely out of it.
 

Tribble

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RaM

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On the way home today it may have been the hottest day in the memory of UK man
but it was leathering it down, roads flooded and lightening filling the sky, got out of
the car and both of us had our hair was standing on end due to the static charge in the air,
looked like a pair of gonks.
 

SummerLightning

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One curious event on the UK's second-hottest day on record was a 'heat burst' at the oddly-named Donna Nook on the Lincolnshire coast. At 9pm, a decaying thunderstorm brought hot air rushing to the surface, raising the temperature from 22 to 32 Celsius in just half an hour. It returned to its previous level in about half that time. The phenomenon is pretty rare in the UK, and a temperature that high (90F in old money) at that time of the evening is just extraordinary.
 

Mythopoeika

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One curious event on the UK's second-hottest day on record was a 'heat burst' at the oddly-named Donna Nook on the Lincolnshire coast. At 9pm, a decaying thunderstorm brought hot air rushing to the surface, raising the temperature from 22 to 32 Celsius in just half an hour. It returned to its previous level in about half that time. The phenomenon is pretty rare in the UK, and a temperature that high (90F in old money) at that time of the evening is just extraordinary.
I have a friend who lives down the coast from Donna Nook. I'll ask her if she experienced the sudden heat rise.
 
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