What Are You Eating & Drinking?

hunck

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Planning a quick stir-fry the other day, I'd run out of olive oil & found a small bottle of toasted sesame oil in my cupboard. Use-by date was 2008! Tasted it first before using & it wasn't ghastly. Just the 10 years past use-by. Will bin now, don't want to push my luck..
 

Mythopoeika

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Planning a quick stir-fry the other day, I'd run out of olive oil & found a small bottle of toasted sesame oil in my cupboard. Use-by date was 2008! Tasted it first before using & it wasn't ghastly. Just the 10 years past use-by. Will bin now, don't want to push my luck..
Most of those oils can be kept for years before going rancid. I think peanut oil is probably the best.
I've seen Steve1989MREInfo eat some really ancient peanut butter and it was in perfect condition.
 

JamesWhitehead

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peanut oil is probably the best.
The oils found on the shelves of regular UK supermarkets are mainly highly-refined, so their groundnut/peanut oil has very little aroma.

I used to buy a version from Chinese supermarkets, which was essentially the Extra Virgin kind, though there is/was no standard labelling protocol. This did have the aroma of peanuts. I suspect these more flavoursome oils go rancid more quickly.

Certainly the worst E. V. olive oil I ever tasted was an expensive, unfiltered one. It was approaching its expiry date - hence the generous price - but it really had exceeded it, flavour-wise! Nut oils at bargain price, such as hazelnut, walnut, etc. may also prove false economies. I'm seeing a lot of avocado oil at the moment, at knock-down prices, but I am not too keen to experiment . . .

Perhaps toasting would help preserve the sesame oil, though the seeds themselves quickly go reesty on the shelf. :hungo:
 
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cycleboy2

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Mug of tea and a bagel, half with butter (slightly salted), half with Whole Earth smooth peanut butter. I only eat Whole Earth or Meridian peanut butter, nothing with sugar in it (unlike those nasty cheap US-type peanut butters).
 

catseye

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Pfft, I once found a box of Creme Eggs in the kitchen that were several years out of date and ate them all and I'm still here.
I subscribe to the theory that if it hasn't got a coating of mould, it's fine to eat.

Oddly enough the chocolate tastes a bit stale and the nuts have a bit of an odd texture. I'm not ascribing it to age so much as being cheap! Er, the nuts and raisins, obviously, not me.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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I subscribe to the theory that if it hasn't got a coating of mould, it's fine to eat.
Good theory. I will never though (like I know some people do) pick mouldy bits off something (e.g. bread) and eat the rest. *shivers* Uuggggh.

I had some grapes last week that were dated a few days prior to when I ate them. They'd been kept in the fridge and didn't have any mould on, so Mr Zebra said they were fine for me to eat. Tasted just like grapes normally do.
 

catseye

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Most food is fine to eat, even when well past the sell by date. I only make an exception for meat and fish...although my daughter did once find some sausages that had been in the back of the fridge for months, (I was going to feed them to the dogs but kept forgetting), cooked and ate them. She's still fine.
 

escargot

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I subscribe to the theory that if it hasn't got a coating of mould, it's fine to eat.
A local factory takes in mouldy cheese and removes the outside layer with the mould on, then reprocesses the remaining cheese into other products. like, er, I dunno, possibly 'processed cheese'. It's perfectly legal and is done openly.

So nobody who lives near here is bothered by mouldy cheese because we all know someone who works there and can vouch that it's safe once you've hacked off the blue bits.
 

hunck

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That stuff is just horrible. I bought a big tub of Meridian and couldn't finish it. Had to throw it away.
I get this, imo it's the biz. Ingredients: roasted organic peanuts with skin on. What don't you like about that? It doesn't have any sugar so not as sweet as most others, no added oil, & is a lot lumpier, less pulverised. Are you sure you actually like peanuts?..
 

hunck

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Fish Finger sarnie
I know you good folks will have an answer to this - which fish fingers are best?

The last ones I tried were Youngs. Wouldn't buy them again. A lot of finger & not much fish. Fell apart even with gentle handling & neither fish nor coating tasted very nice.
 

Mythopoeika

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I get this, imo it's the biz. Ingredients: roasted organic peanuts with skin on. What don't you like about that? It doesn't have any sugar so not as sweet as most others, no added oil, & is a lot lumpier, less pulverised. Are you sure you actually like peanuts?..
I bought it on the basis of it having 'all natural ingredients'. It's the taste and dryness that I didn't like.
Oh yeah, and the colour is just too pale. It looks ill.
 

catseye

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A local factory takes in mouldy cheese and removes the outside layer with the mould on, then reprocesses the remaining cheese into other products. like, er, I dunno, possibly 'processed cheese'. It's perfectly legal and is done openly.

So nobody who lives near here is bothered by mouldy cheese because we all know someone who works there and can vouch that it's safe once you've hacked off the blue bits.
Or even if you leave the blue bits in - see 'Stilton' etc.
 

Swifty

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I know you good folks will have an answer to this - which fish fingers are best?

The last ones I tried were Youngs. Wouldn't buy them again. A lot of finger & not much fish. Fell apart even with gentle handling & neither fish nor coating tasted very nice.
I still stick with Birdseye cod fish fingers.
 

cycleboy2

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I bought it on the basis of it having 'all natural ingredients'. It's the taste and dryness that I didn't like.
Oh yeah, and the colour is just too pale. It looks ill.
The oil separates and sits at the top. Stir it in every time you use it and it isn't dry.

When I was in Bathurst, Australia years ago, the local health food store had its own peanut butter-making machine. It pulverises peanuts (and nothing else) into a butter, filling whatever jar/tub you bring to the store. Never seen one in this country but I think it would be popular. Peanuts aren't that expensive, (good) peanut butter is.

Might have been one of these:
https://pleasanthillgrain.com/olde-tyme-nut-grinder-machine-mill

You might notice I like my peanut butter (but not with sugar in it, ever!).
 

Lord Lucan

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After working from 8.15 a.m until 10.45 p.m due to a late night Christmas shopping event in our town, the only thing open was McDonalds. A Big Mac, large fries, a diet coke and a few chicken nuggets to share had to suffice. Tomorrow night however will be a different story as my wife and I are being taken out by a friend of ours to somewhere rather nice.
 

Coal

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It is, isn't it? Fancy name for a mundane chocolate sponge cake. Try Stollen, it's delicious, and proper Christmassy (as long as you like marzipan).
Lidl mini Stollens are really lush.
 
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