What Are You Eating & Drinking?

Shady

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There are different sorts of dirty fries, mine was the Co-op ones

Co-op's so-called "dirty fries" are basically spicy fries topped with mozzarella, mature cheddar, Monterey Jack cheese sauce and fiery jalapenos.
 

INT21

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o_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_O

Fuck that for a game of soldiers mate, move to Cromer instead .. me and the Mrs will look after you and watch your back .. although being Scottish and this being Norfolk, prepare to be 'affectionately' called a 'porridge wog'.
One of my granddaughters who is half Scottish sometimes refers to herself as a 'porridge wog'.
 

James_H

And I like to roam the land
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A good weekend of eating:

Saturday lunch: noodles with burger cheese, curry sauce and chicken wings in a Japanese restaurant. You mix the curry sauce and burger cheese up with the noodles and it is amazing.

Saturday dinner: roast chicken and roast potatoes

Sunday breakfast: boiled eggs and toast

Sunday lunch: bitter melon fried egg and fried sweet potato leaves

Sunday dinner: fried rice with the leftover chicken.
 

James_H

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Today dinner: chinese (cantonese-style) sausages cut into small pieces and stir fried with choi sum, sichuan pepper, and some red chillies. A bit of ginger and a dash of light soy sauce and I think that's it. Definitely edible.
 
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I made a pork dish with sichuan pepper the other night. It is a most unusal ingredient, notable for its mouth-numbing property. I threw out my stash of the pure stuff, as it had gone stale. What I used this week was a blend in a Jamie Oliver grinder. It took a lot of grinding to get a decent quantity of the stuff, but all the time, one can imagine one is twisting his neck! :evil:
 

Swifty

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When it stops raining, I think I'm going to walk down to Morrisons café and have an all day breakfast because I've been given the day off work .. that or half a roast chicken with gravy, chips and peas there but I need to remember to take some cranberry sauce with me from our fridge. I just can't be arsed to cook anything today.
 

James_H

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I made a pork dish with sichuan pepper the other night. It is a most unusal ingredient, notable for its mouth-numbing property. I threw out my stash of the pure stuff, as it had gone stale. What I used this week was a blend in a Jamie Oliver grinder. It took a lot of grinding to get a decent quantity of the stuff, but all the time, one can imagine one is twisting his neck! :evil:
It's great stuff but I don't really know how to use it except when cooking leafy vegetables – I saw a friend in sichuan do it this way: add sichuan pepper to the hot oil, along with garlic, and then fry the greens in it. But they put it in everything there.
 

JamesWhitehead

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I don't really know how to use it
I seem to recall, when I used the pure stuff, that cooks were advised to roast the "peppercorns" to activate their aroma, before crushing or grinding them. The Jamie Oliver grinder contains a mix of chili flakes (47%) small sichuan peppercorns (22%) sea salt (20%) and ginger (11%).

Tasted straight from the grinder, it has a toasted flavour.

It is not strictly a pepper at all; the grains have a little tail on them and are split, so they look like a pacman character. :hunger:

I need to get some of that fermented sichuan-style chili and garlic paste. The last jar I bought was made in Hong Kong!
 

James_H

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I need to get some of that fermented sichuan-style chili and garlic paste. The last jar I bought was made in Hong Kong!
This doesn't have any sichuan pepper but I swear by this stuff. Made in Taiwan I think, fermented bean and chilli sauce: https://shopee.ph/Old-Donkey-Super-Hot-Spicy-Chili-Paste-with-Garlic-240g-i.15468000.864718371

A little goes a long way.

I did learn how to make Sichuan chilli oil from my friend. Basically you put chilli flakes, chopped leeks, garlic, and sichuan pepper in a jar. Then you heat up some vegetable or corn oil to a high temperature and pour it into the jar. You can put the oil in noodle soups etc. I'd be afraid of the jar breaking but apparently she wasn't.
 

James_H

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Bitter melon scrambled eggs again, this time I cooked it myself. Very easy but tasty and probably healthy:

Bitter melon, sliced in half, seeds and pith removed, then sliced into semicircular pieces
A little ginger, diced finely
4 eggs
cooking oil

Salt then blanch the bitter melon to take the edge off the bitterness
Mix the eggs in a bowl
Fry ginger, melon, eggs, putting them in the pan in this order

Remove from the pan when eggs are still runny. Eat with rice.

Edit - I added a chopped chilli too

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Shady

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The quorn ones are as well
Oranges, apple and a cheese and cranberry vegetarian roll, also tried a cup of Yorkshire Tea, decaff bedtime brew with vanilla and nutmeg, tasted a bit like a kipper
 

James_H

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Had at least three new things today in a Shanghainese restaurant: drunken pig's foot, a vegetable called Cho tau (?) And something called fan pei (powder skin?) Which is a kind of flat sheet noodle made from mung beans. All very good.
 

GNC

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A detailed description would be nice.
It was a Jamie Oliver recipe (good book, this), with root veg like turnip, celeriac, carrots, etc plus lentils, cooked in a tomato stock, placed in a dish and covered with mashed potato. Pop it in the oven till it's crisp on top, then consume - you'll have enough left over for the next day, too. Great for this time of year.
 

escargot

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It was a Jamie Oliver recipe (good book, this), with root veg like turnip, celeriac, carrots, etc plus lentils, cooked in a tomato stock, placed in a dish and covered with mashed potato. Pop it in the oven till it's crisp on top, then consume - you'll have enough left over for the next day, too. Great for this time of year.
Sounds good, thank you.
 
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