What Music?

Mikefule

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Interesting. The first few pages in the thread, people were writing about the music they liked, and what they actually liked about it. In the last few pages, people have just been posting links to videos. There's nothing wrong with that, but it says less about the music and where it comes form, and less about the posters and their tastes.

I was brought up in a household with no music other than what was on the radio, which was mainly bland middle of the road pop of the time.

When I was about 16, my dad surprised us all by buying a music centre: a combined vinyl turntable, cassette tape deck and radio, the whole thing being about a metre wide, with a hinged smoked perspex lid. It seems laughable now, when I can access thousands of tracks on my mobile or laptop, but back then it was the height of sophistication.

An elderly neighbour heard we now had a record player and gave us some old vinyl records including Cliff Richard's first album: recorded live in 1959 and called "Cliff." I remember a picture on the album sleeve: Cliff was signing autographs for a group of young women and the caption was, "Cliff smilingly satisfies pretty fans." How we chuckled.

That record included his backing band, the Shadows, who later became an instrumental band and played tunes such as Apache, and Wonderful Land. The record was the start of my love of rock and roll music, and a year or two later, The Shadows were the first band I ever saw live.

Around 40 years later, my tastes have broadened, but still radiate from that core of late 50s rock and roll. In one direction, I go back to mid 50s rockabilly, and before that to hillbilly. In the other, I go as far forward as AC/DC, Motörhead, Status Quo, Judas Priest and some of the classic Rolling Stones hits — all basically rock and roll, played a bit louder. Meanwhile, a lifetime spent in Morris dancing and folk music means that I play mainly English traditional music on concertina and sing unaccompanied in après Morris pub sessions and folk clubs.

So what link to post? Tempted by the stuff many of you will already be familiar with, but here's one from the less well known Charlie Feathers, who fell somewhere between hillbilly and rockabilly. It's a work of lyrical genius, using the recently invented domestic freezer as an extended metaphor for the cold heart of a woman whom he loves unrequitedly. (i.e. It's completely daft, but endearingly fun.) Charlie Feathers was in at the beginning in the "Sun years" but made himself difficult to work with, and was soon left behind by the names who are better known to the wider public today. He was allegedly a fantasist who claimed to have taught Buddy Holly the famous "hiccup" and also claimed to have invented the echo technique which was a staple of the early rockabilly sound. He continued to record as a singer even after he had had a lung removed.

 

Vardoger

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Interesting. The first few pages in the thread, people were writing about the music they liked, and what they actually liked about it. In the last few pages, people have just been posting links to videos. There's nothing wrong with that, but it says less about the music and where it comes form, and less about the posters and their tastes.

Youtube wasn't available when the thread started. Now, instead of just telling people what they like, they can show people what they like.
 

Yithian

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Interesting to read that owing to Roger Moore's age and his film-by-film contract negotiations, the production team for the film were considering other actors to portray Bond in For Your Eyes Only--including Lewis Collins from The Professionals!

Amusing also that despite his age Moore stayed for four more years and did two more films (Octopussy & A View to a Kill, both of which I like).

Moore, incidentally, being my favourite Bond.

Of course I like Connery, too.

Who doesn't?
 

Mikefule

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Youtube wasn't available when the thread started. Now, instead of just telling people what they like, they can show people what they like.
[My italics]

YouTube was developed 2005 and bought by Google 2006. The first shared YouTube links in this thread start to appear around 2011, but even then, they are examples posted into a thread that continues to be mainly enthusiastic and knowledgeable discussion.

We all love music in different ways and particular tracks or artists for different reasons. We hear different things in the music. Show me a link to something that is in an unfamiliar style and if I click it at all, I may listen to 20 seconds of it and decide it's not for me.

Tell me what you love about it, or what to listen for, or highlight some aspect that makes it great or meaningful to you and I might listen to the whole track and enjoy it. Tell me an interesting fact or anecdote about an artist I already know a bit about and we have the beginnings of a conversation.

I use YouTube and Spotify every day of my life. I'm not against sharing links, but I am for "show and tell", rather than just "show".

Here's a song I both love and struggle to listen to: Don't Let Daddy Kiss Me, by Motörhead. It's a long way from their standard hard rock. It's a sensitive, sad and angry song, which the hard man of rock sings slowly and quietly with a simple accompaniment.

Lemmy wrote it and wanted to find a female singer who would record it. None of them would touch it because of the subject matter, but the song was important to Lemmy so he recorded it himself and put it on a hard rock album as well as releasing it as a single in 1993. It was many years after that before the problem of child sex abuse became openly discussed in the way that it is now.

 

GNC

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I always try to include a couple of lines about why the song I've posted is worth listening to.
 

Yithian

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Here's a song I both love and struggle to listen to: Don't Let Daddy Kiss Me, by Motörhead. It's a long way from their standard hard rock. It's a sensitive, sad and angry song, which the hard man of rock sings slowly and quietly with a simple accompaniment.

Lemmy wrote it and wanted to find a female singer who would record it. None of them would touch it because of the subject matter, but the song was important to Lemmy so he recorded it himself and put it on a hard rock album as well as releasing it as a single in 1993. It was many years after that before the problem of child sex abuse became openly discussed in the way that it is now.


A favourite of mine that I used to listen a lot was The Mission. The first time that I heard this I realised that the lyrics were sinister, but it took a few listens to realise what it was about. Still, a great song, my second-favourite from them behind Wasteland.

It's from 1990, an era when, as you say, child abuse certainly wasn't top of the list for song inspiration--especially not abuse within the family.

 

Spudrick68

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I feel like a bit of blues, so Robert Johnson it is. Legend has it that he met at the crossroad of Highway 49 and 61, where the devil gave him his guitar back if he sold his soul to him.

 

FrKadash

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After all these years early and 80s TD is still some of my favourite music. My favourites are the more abstract Zeit (1972) and Rubycon (1975), but the second track on their 1983 album Hyperborea is brilliant.

 

Yithian

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Tangerine Dream played through decent headphones while on the move transforms the whole journey. I used to do much the same with the Ozric Tentacles, but although their music is pleasantly retro-heavy you can't beat those first and second-wave synths from 70s Tangerine Dream.

My first taste of Tangerine Dream, incidently, was Force Majeure, which really brings out the geographic and topographic theme of the record, much like Brian Eno's ambient work and some Mike Oldfield.
 
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Tangerine Dream played through decent headphones while on the move transforms the whole journey. I used to do much the same with the Ozric Tentacles, but although their music is pleasantly retro-heavy you can't beat those first and second-wave synths from 70s Tangerine Dream.

My first taste of Tangerine Dream, incidently, was Force Majeure, which really brings out the geographic and topographic theme of the record, much like Brian Eno's ambient work and some Mike Oldfield.
Mine was actually Hyperbrea, posted above. I was into JM Jarre, Oldfield Eno & Budd and was a 2nd hand record shop tragic when I found the CD. I was intrigued by the cover. I found it decent enough, and then when Sphinx Lightning began I tripped right out.

To add to Mike's well-made points, I'd often pair up music for atmosphere to add to the themes of what I was reading. I do the same when I'm writing.

So for example Hyperborea scored my emotional response to Paul Brunton's The Inner Reality and Robert Silverberg, Pink Floyd's Division Bell worked well with The Lord of the Rings, and Gondwanaland gelled nicely with Tim Winton's Dirt Music.

I don't read much outside the toilet since I've been addicted to the internet for these past 20 years. I still pair musical type to what I'm browsing, but it isn't quite the same experience, as televisual browsing merely externalises the imagination and so little impacts at a deeper insightful level. I really think I've lost a lot of the rich experience of reading in favour of the immediacy of personal online contact and expression.

More power to the good old book.

Incidentally, I'm enjoying this ambient music as I mousetype through the on-screen keyboard laying in bed on fine winter's Friday. It's wonderful music.

 
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Great B sides from U2's Fly era - my favourite of their eclectic trilogies. I've said it before, but their Achtung shift into industrial away from the late 80s stadium anthem stuff was the bravest move in their career. A work of pure brilliance. Won me back in spades.

A postcard of my 90s with scores

Achtung Baby



Zooropa



Pop







 
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This lovely old folk song from 1972 popped up on the recs from the above video. Never heard it or of them before. Jacqui McShee's voice is awesome.

Pentangle ~ Willy O' Winsbury
 
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