What Were You Doing Five Minutes Ago?

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Getting ready for bed and trying to ignore the smell of freshly-sanded floorboards.
The horror. Why would anyone wish to ignore the smell of freshly sanded wood? (I love the smell of sawdust in the morning. Smells like....work.)

(If you haven't already got your treatment sourced - I'd recommend Osmo Polyx-Oil. Which isn't actually at all oily.)
 
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The horror. Why would anyone wish to ignore the smell of freshly sanded wood? (I love the smell of sawdust in the morning. Smells like....work.)

(If you haven't already got your treatment sourced - I'd recommend Osmo Polyx-Oil. Which isn't actually at all oily.)
The boards are incredibly old and untreated, so in consequence they're covered in years of ground-in dirt... as a result the smell is less "hamster cage" and more "burning dust".

Thanks for the tip - but we've already bought two pots of Ronseal Dark Oak. Not looking forward to applying it this afternoon, as it'll give rise to another kind of unpleasant smell...
 
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The boards are incredibly old and untreated, so in consequence they're covered in years of ground-in dirt... as a result the smell is less "hamster cage" and more "burning dust"...
Ah, yes. And if they were anything like mine, that dark paint-like varnish (or varnish-like paint) that Victorians/Edwardians slathered their bare boards with - which seems to be made of some sort of industrial treacle, liquifies when you attempt to sand it off, and is apparently virtually indestructable. They should paint tanks with it.
 
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Tigerhawk

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Of course artists would consider a hard days work vulgarly offensive!
It wasn't artists who thought that. They portrayed working class people doing the hard labour that kept the middle classes in comfort, but had their work rejected by the art establishment who preferred to see images of heroism and beauty.

This painting was angrily rejected by the The Jury of the Paris Salon, which action steered Caillebotte towards the Impressionists.
 

Tigerhawk

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It wasn't artists who thought that. They portrayed working class people doing the hard labour that kept the middle classes in comfort, but had their work rejected by the art establishment who preferred to see images of heroism and beauty.
Put them to work down the mines, see how they like it!
 
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Ah, yes. And if they were anything like mine, that dark paint-like varnish (or varnish-like paint) that Victorians/Edwardians slathered their bare boards with - which seems to be made of some sort of industrial treacle, liquifies when you attempt to sand it off, and is apparently virtually indestructable. They should paint tanks with it.
Hmm there are dark edges to the boards in all of the rooms... I wonder if that's the treacle-like substance you speak of?
 
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Ah, I can picture the scene -

View attachment 15625

That's actually The Floor-scrapers by Gustave Caillebotte, painted in the early 1870s. It's apparently an accurate depiction of work being done in the artist's own home and was rejected for exhibition as vulgarly offensive.
https://mydailyartdisplay.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/the-floor-scrapers-by-gustave-caillebotte.jpg
Sadly we don't have three strapping shirtless men doing the work for us as we're doing it ourselves :miner:

I love the fact that such a great painting was seen as vulgar in those days. I can imagine stuffy bedizened aristocratic ladies scoffing at the thought that anyone might like to see labourers depicted in fine art.
 
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