What's Up At The BBC?

Rahere

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Mar 12, 2019
Messages
85
Reaction score
74
Points
18

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
29,418
Reaction score
34,668
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
This is tricky without getting into the politics, but it sounds as if the government is poised to scrap the licence fee and introduce a subscription model.

It has been on the cards for a long time now.
 

RaM

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 12, 2015
Messages
1,598
Reaction score
2,712
Points
159
Location
NW UK
If they shut it tomorrow the only bit I would miss is radio 4EX
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
40,237
Reaction score
29,499
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
This is tricky without getting into the politics, but it sounds as if the government is poised to scrap the licence fee and introduce a subscription model.

It has been on the cards for a long time now.
Excellent! The only bit I use is the BBC News website.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

My joints go out more than I do
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
2,761
Reaction score
5,589
Points
204
Location
Ute inte på landet.
They should bring back test cards.

There isn't enough quality television to fill the rolling 24-hours so instead of showing so much drivel they should have 'startup' at say 8am and 'shutdown' at 11pm, with breaks late afternoon for test cards etc. Complete with optimistic orchestral startup music of course.

And transmitter information before startup. Oh yes.
 

tuco

Spitting in a wishing well
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
540
Reaction score
2,013
Points
133
Location
south of south
They should bring back test cards.

There isn't enough quality television to fill the rolling 24-hours so instead of showing so much drivel they should have 'startup' at say 8am and 'shutdown' at 11pm, with breaks late afternoon for test cards etc. Complete with optimistic orchestral startup music of course.

And transmitter information before startup. Oh yes.
Yes, I agree and bring back the horrible girl with the chalk board and strange doll.
 

Tapeloop

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Aug 4, 2002
Messages
102
Reaction score
198
Points
74
I'll stick up for the BBC. It isn't perfect, but I think a move to subscription would be a total disaster.

I watch almost everything on BBC4, lots of good comedy on BBC2/BBC4, follow their excellent sports coverage both on TV, 5 Live and local radio. Superb nature documentaries, my friends with kids have relied on CBeebies a lot over the years. As someone with insomnia, the BBC News Channel is far better in the middle of the night than any other channel I have access to. I keep the BBC website open all the time too. For radio, I'd be lost without 5 Live, R4, 6 Music or even some of the fringe late night Radio 3 shows. I use the iPlayer far more than any other streaming service.

I just can't see how they could afford things like football coverage rights on a subscription basis. Try listening to a football match on Talk Sport and contrast it with 5 Live (unless you really like betting adverts). Or imagine the Olympics on Channel 5 with adverts every 5 minutes.

Hopefully just hot air and speculation by the Sunday Times today. Hmm, wonder what that organisation would stand to gain from a subscription based BBC? Hopefully I've held my tongue and not mentioned politics here, hard work!
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

My joints go out more than I do
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
2,761
Reaction score
5,589
Points
204
Location
Ute inte på landet.
I'll stick up for the BBC. It isn't perfect, but I think a move to subscription would be a total disaster.

I watch almost everything on BBC4, lots of good comedy on BBC2/BBC4, follow their excellent sports coverage both on TV, 5 Live and local radio. Superb nature documentaries, my friends with kids have relied on CBeebies a lot over the years. As someone with insomnia, the BBC News Channel is far better in the middle of the night than any other channel I have access to. I keep the BBC website open all the time too. For radio, I'd be lost without 5 Live, R4, 6 Music or even some of the fringe late night Radio 3 shows. I use the iPlayer far more than any other streaming service.

I just can't see how they could afford things like football coverage rights on a subscription basis. Try listening to a football match on Talk Sport and contrast it with 5 Live (unless you really like betting adverts). Or imagine the Olympics on Channel 5 with adverts every 5 minutes.

Hopefully just hot air and speculation by the Sunday Times today. Hmm, wonder what that organisation would stand to gain from a subscription based BBC? Hopefully I've held my tongue and not mentioned politics here, hard work!

It's all a matter of taste though, isn't it? :) (Why does Kenny Everett come to mind when I say that?)

There will be people who like BBC programming, as you do (and that's fair enough), and there will be others like me who don't watch any BBC stuff and feel it grossly unfair to be paying for a TV licence when we don't use the service that the payment is for.

And on the other side of the coin, and without any malice (as it may come out wrong as I'm typing this) but presumably if there is so much BBC stuff that you like watching/listening to, then you wouldn't have a problem with paying the subscription for it in place of the TV licence, as you would get your money's worth as it were?

Whereas I would wholly welcome the simple freedom to not pay for something that I don't use :)


(Yes I watch BBC News but that is only because it is marginally better than Sky News and that's the only two choices there are. If it suddenly became subscription-only in place of a TV licence, then I wouldn't bother with it at all and would have to suffer Kay Burley more often).
 

Tapeloop

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Aug 4, 2002
Messages
102
Reaction score
198
Points
74
But surely then we are in the dodgy territory of "I don't have kids but I pay for schools" and stoopid tax stuff like that :)

I do think they should modernise the license fee somehow, but no idea how I'm afraid. By making it non binding, loads of people wouldn't bother but I bet quite a lot would still be sneakily watching Eastenders. I do get that it is unfair to people who don't watch much BBC though, honestly. :)

I'd pay the subscription fee no problem if it was roughly the same price, but take away BBC4, 5 Live, 6 Music, local radio, and it looks less appealing. If enough people choose not to, then the standard of output drops as they simply can't afford to compete and all the decent comedy goes to Sky for example (which I can nowhere near afford).

I'm not sure you can compare something like Netflix with it's very limited service compared to the wide range of the BBC, which seems to be the argument made by the people in charge of this. Dunno, can't afford a Sunday Times subscription to read the article so I'm relying on angry people on Twitter ;)
 

INT21

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,781
Reaction score
6,424
Points
279
Would we Venerable Seniors get free subscriptions ?

INT21
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

My joints go out more than I do
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
2,761
Reaction score
5,589
Points
204
Location
Ute inte på landet.
I agree it is not a simple situation (is anything ever?) :)

It wouldn't be so bad if (a) the TV licence wasn't such a ridiculously high amount, and (b) it didn't keep increasing in indirect proportion to the quality of the programming produced.

Of course the BBC would scream and complain that any reduction (or lack of increase) in the licence fee would cause untold horror and suffering in their programming department, but would it really? Perhaps if the fee were reduced (lets say a nominal £50) then those of us who don't use it wouldn't feel quite so bad about it, and it might streamline the BBC's thoughts into producing better output for all.

(Wishful thinking I know) :)
 

Tapeloop

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Aug 4, 2002
Messages
102
Reaction score
198
Points
74
Of course the BBC would scream and complain that any reduction (or lack of increase) in the licence fee would cause untold horror and suffering in their programming department, but would it really?
Trouble is, then you'd get people moaning about the new contestants on this year's Strictly Come Dancing being 80s pop star Sonya, five YouTube channel owners who nobody over 15 has ever heard of and some bloke who was on Big Brother 3, plus why it comes live from Basingstoke Ice Rink each week :)

There has to be a better way of keeping everybody happy with the fee, but I don't think trashing the whole BBC is the way unless there were other reasons behind this (point me to the conspiracy section!)
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

My joints go out more than I do
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
2,761
Reaction score
5,589
Points
204
Location
Ute inte på landet.
Trouble is, then you'd get people moaning about the new contestants on this year's Strictly Come Dancing being 80s pop star Sonya, five YouTube channel owners who nobody over 15 has ever heard of and some bloke who was on Big Brother 3, plus why it comes live from Basingstoke Ice Rink each week :)
That pretty much sums up what television is like for me nowadays! No wonder I stick to old films on the Talking Pictures channel.

:)
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
28,144
Reaction score
38,537
Points
284
I agree it is not a simple situation (is anything ever?) :)

It wouldn't be so bad if (a) the TV licence wasn't such a ridiculously high amount, and (b) it didn't keep increasing in indirect proportion to the quality of the programming produced.

Of course the BBC would scream and complain that any reduction (or lack of increase) in the licence fee would cause untold horror and suffering in their programming department, but would it really? Perhaps if the fee were reduced (lets say a nominal £50) then those of us who don't use it wouldn't feel quite so bad about it, and it might streamline the BBC's thoughts into producing better output for all.

(Wishful thinking I know) :)
The BBC think nothing of hiring a normal taxi cab and sending it from London to anywhere in Britain at a cost of somewhere between 500 to a grand a time there and back .. my mate had this happen just so he could but his signature on a contract for his 10 second clip to be played .. now times that by the how many other ten second clips were included in that show and how many other people were in that clip and then by how many different new shows were on that day etc etc .. the BBC spunk money away on a colossal scale.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
40,237
Reaction score
29,499
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
The BBC think nothing of hiring a normal taxi cab and sending it from London to anywhere in Britain at a cost of somewhere between 500 to a grand a time there and back .. my mate had this happen just so he could but his signature on a contract for his 10 second clip to be played .. now times that by the how many other ten second clips were included in that show and how many other people were in that clip and then by how many different new shows were on that day etc etc .. the BBC spunk money away on a colossal scale.
Yeah, they haven't heard of budgets and cost saving. It's 'easy come, easy go' money.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
28,144
Reaction score
38,537
Points
284
Yeah, they haven't heard of budgets and cost saving. It's 'easy come, easy go' money.
Don't get me wrong, the BBC were brilliant during WW2 providing the world service ..... but that was 75 years ago .. 10 out of 10 to the Queen for remaining grateful and all but I think it's time we all moved on.
 

stu neville

Commissioner.
Staff member
Joined
Mar 9, 2002
Messages
11,798
Reaction score
4,884
Points
234
I'm not sure you can compare something like Netflix with it's very limited service
Netflix is twelve billion dollars in debt.
It wouldn't be so bad if (a) the TV licence wasn't such a ridiculously high amount, and (b) it didn't keep increasing in indirect proportion to the quality of the programming produced.
50p a day. There is an argument to be made that there are too many channels, and the bureaucracy is definitely bloated, but overall it does what it does brilliantly, and in terms of putative bias it gets it in the neck from both sides: it's in an impossible position.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
29,893
Reaction score
16,024
Points
309
Gotta say, I love the BBC, but thanks to its "please as many people as possible" remit it's bound to piss some people off. Some powerful people, especially at other media outlets who regard their millions of viewers, listeners and readers with envious eyes and will chip away at them at every opportunity.

Comparing them to the streaming services doesn't match up - Netflix and Amazon don't do radio, don't employ journalists, and don't promote British talent in the massive amounts that the BBC does. But piracy may be the real issue - too many people want their entertainment and information for free, and resent having to pay wages of those who provide it. E.g. a friend of mine has Netflix, but is so addicted to downloading that he downloaded The Irishman, forgetting he could have watched it on Netflix anyway.

Stormy weather ahead for the Beeb, especially if it's a political football, but there's so much more to it than news. I hope it survives - I need my radio and the commercial channels are a joke.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

My joints go out more than I do
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
2,761
Reaction score
5,589
Points
204
Location
Ute inte på landet.
Don't get me wrong, the BBC were brilliant during WW2 providing the world service ..... but that was 75 years ago .. 10 out of 10 to the Queen for remaining grateful and all but I think it's time we all moved on.
Exactly. The TV licence made perfect sense back in the days when all we had was terrestrial telly, (BBC2 605 line colour and all that!).... back when people with a telly would have been watching a lot of BBC programmes.

But that was then, and this is now. Times have changed.


50p a day. There is an argument to be made that there are too many channels, and the bureaucracy is definitely bloated, but overall it does what it does brilliantly, and in terms of putative bias it gets it in the neck from both sides: it's in an impossible position.
Yes, it doesn't sound much like that... but that's still my 50p that I am forced to pay for something that I don't use (or risk punishment no less!). It's the principal of the thing. As for doing things brilliantly, then I think we shall have to agree to disagree; neither myself nor Mr Zebra think that anything the BBC does nowadays is 'brilliant' *, but it's all subjective, isn't it. :)


*and I'm refraining from saying anything else in case it gets too political :boh:
 
Top