Who Ya Gonna Call? Ghost Hunters & Hunting

packshaud

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
151
Reaction score
343
Points
64
Location
Brazil
anything... odd? And I'm not interested in orbs!

I'm a believer in the idea that the more you get into this stuff the more the stuff happens in your vicinity. A sort of selective perception plus.
What happens is that you start to notice things related to the subject, because you know about it. A lot of what we experience every day is filtered out. It is like skipping unknown words while reading a book.

And to the extent that whatever you are interested on can react, your interest will be noticed. This actually is a huge problem. We will never know to what extent John Keel actually believed in all of what he said, but I believe he had real issues with the infamous men in black. A more scholarly example is Gustav Davidson, a poet. He wrote a book called A Dictionary of Angels, Including the Fallen Angels (originally in 1967), collecting information on the subject. Here is a long excerpt from the introduction (in my copy, at pages xi to xii, typed by hand, errors might abound), with his comments on the information gathering for the book:

Gustav Davidson said:
All of these goetic tracts yielded a boundless profusion of angels (and demons), and I soon had more of the fluttering creatures than I knew what to do with. In order to keep my work within more sizable limits, I started weeding out (Heaven forgive me!) what I considered to be the less important names, or the ones about which little or no data could be found.

At this stage of the quest I was literally bedeviled by angels. They stalked and leaguered me, by night and day. I could not tell the evil from the good, demons from daevas, satans from seraphim; nor (to quote a poem composed at the time) "if that world I could not hope to prove,/Flaming with heavenly beasts, holy and grim,/Was any less real than that in which I moved." I moved, indeed, in a twilight zone of tall presences, through enchanted forests lit with the sinister splendor of fallen divinities; of aeons and archons, peris and paracletes, elohim and avatars. I felt somewhat like Dante, in the opening canto of The Divine Comedy, when, midway upon the journey of his life, he found himself astray in a dusky wood. Or like some knight of old, ready to try conclusions with any adversary, real or fancied. I remember one occasion--it was winter and getting dark--returning home from a neighboring farm. I had cut across an unfamiliar field. Suddenly a nightmarish shape loomed up in front of me, barring my progress. After a paralyzing moment I managed to fight my way past the phantom. The next morning I could not be sure (not more than Jacob was, when he wrestled with his dark antagonist at Peniel) whether I had encountered a ghost, an angel, a demon, or God. There were other such moments and other such encounters, when I passed from terror to trance, from intimations of realms unguessed at to the uneasy conviction that, beyond the reach of our senses, beyond the arch of all our experience sacred and profane, there was only--to use an expression of Paul's in I Timothy 4--"fable and endless genealogy."

Logic, I felt, was my only safe anchor in reality; but if, as Walter Nigg points out, "angels are powers which transcend the logic of our existence," did it follow that one is constrained to abandon logic in order to entertain angels?⁴ For the sake of angels I was ready to subscribe to Coleridge's "willing suspension of disbelief." I was even ready to drink his "milk of Paradise." But I was troubled. Never a respecter of authority, per se, particularly when it was backed by the "salvific light of revelation," I nevertheless kept repeating to myself that I was pitting my personal and necessarily circumscribed experience, logic, and belief (or nonbelief) against the experience, logic, and belief of some of the boldest and profoundest minds of all times--minds that had reshaped the world's thinking and emancipated it (to a degree, at any rate) from the bondage of superstition and error. Still, I was averse to associating myself with opinions and creeds, no matter how hallowed by time or tradition, or by whomsoever held, that were plainly repugnant to common sense. A professed belief in angels would, inevitably, involve me in a belief in the supernatural, and that was the golden share I did not wish to be caught in. Without committing myself religiously I could conceive of the possibility of there being, in dimensions and worlds other than our own, powers and intelligences outside our present apprehension, and in this sense angels are not to be ruled out as a part of reality--always remembering that we create what we believe. Indeed, I am prepared to say that if enough of us believe in angels, then angels exist.

[...]

4. Walter Nigg's article "Stay you Angels, Stay with Me," Harper's Bazaar, December 1962. The phrase derives from Johann Sebastian Bach's "Cantata for Michaelmas Day."
The poem Davidson mentioned may be Ambushed by Angels & Other Poems (1965), written by himself.

All I can I say about this is that you start like Keel, writing Jadoo, and you might end like... Keel, neck deep in this stuff. I've been there, and I still will refrain from commenting on the time I was gathering books on demons and possession. That part had a happy end: the problems stopped after I concentrated in other areas (those also brought their weirdness, but of course it was not on demons level, most of the time). But possibly there is a point of no return. Forteans, beware.

For all the skeptics here, I must say that these experiences feel very real. The emotional imprint from them can't be removed saying "it didn't happen" the same way PTSD can't be cured saying "this was in the past."
 
Last edited:

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
Staff member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
13,201
Reaction score
15,279
Points
284
Location
An Eochair
Thank you @packshaud !

This bit

Gustav Davidson said:
Suddenly a nightmarish shape loomed up in front of me, barring my progress. After a paralyzing moment I managed to fight my way past the phantom. The next morning I could not be sure (not more than Jacob was, when he wrestled with his dark antagonist at Peniel) whether I had encountered a ghost, an angel, a demon, or God.
is just... just...
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
30,551
Reaction score
45,541
Points
284
anything... odd? And I'm not interested in orbs!

I'm a believer in the idea that the more you get into this stuff the more the stuff happens in your vicinity. A sort of selective perception plus.
Nothing paranormal we spotted, no .. I can send you the wedding video if you want? ..
 

Naughty_Felid

kneesy earsy nosey
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
8,588
Reaction score
11,526
Points
294
I think you're being a bit oversensitive, chum.
That's a sort of leather "cowboy hat" or Stetson (brand name). I have one. It's based on a pattern worn by Australian stockmen among others. The other version, made from felt, is still worn by many members of the American cavalry units in a historic link to the US Cavalry in the past. One You Tuber (The Chieftain) is a serving armoured cavalry officer and did a short video on tanker's equipment (such as coveralls, boots, helmets etc.) and briefly talked about his Stetson.
The only link to the Confederate army was that officers generally wore grey felt Stetsons.
15:03 he is wearing a confederate cap.
I think you're being a bit oversensitive, chum.
That's a sort of leather "cowboy hat" or Stetson (brand name). I have one. It's based on a pattern worn by Australian stockmen among others. The other version, made from felt, is still worn by many members of the American cavalry units in a historic link to the US Cavalry in the past. One You Tuber (The Chieftain) is a serving armoured cavalry officer and did a short video on tanker's equipment (such as coveralls, boots, helmets etc.) and briefly talked about his Stetson.
The only link to the Confederate army was that officers generally wore grey felt Stetsons.
It wasn't his stetson it was his army cap. - you didn't watch it all obviously. I don't care. I was just pointing out that if you want to grow your brand on youtube then you can't wear stuff like that.
 

Stormkhan

Disturbingly familiar
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
4,587
Reaction score
1,661
Points
184
True, I didn't watch all the video; mea culpa. And, as we know, YT can be a bit ... sensitive when it comes to triggering. I mean, having to issue a trigger warning for videos recounting crimes ... on a channel clearly about past crimes, and on one notable occasion a You Tuber deciding to change his name because his 'true crime' video channel was instantly being demonetised because his (real) name was Rob Dyke.
That said, my local militaria shop sells civil war-style kepis in a variety of colours. :)
 
Top