Windermere Speed Limit

Do you support the Speed Limit?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Search for compromise

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,273
Likes
8,875
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#1
Do you agree with the new Wndermere speed limit or not? Or should there be some compromise? (Say, only allow skiing, etc, on x days per week.)

Choppy water for lake speed limit
By Rachel Kerr
BBC News

The aim of Windermere's new speed limit is to bring calm to the lake's waters, but it continues to whip up a storm of opinions.
The introduction of a 10mph by-law on Tuesday marks the end of a process stretching back about 15 years.

Supporters say the limit will remove conflict between lake users, create a tranquil atmosphere and will recapture Windermere's place as the "jewel in the crown of the Lake District".

But opponents say they have nowhere else to water-ski or use power boats, there was no real conflict between users and are concerned about the impact on Windermere's atmosphere and economy.

Keep Windermere Alive Association secretary, Kevan Furber, said: "I am passionate about it. Why can't we manage it for everyone?

"The enjoyment is being taken out of using the lake. The most fantastic thing in the world is to be out on the lake first thing when it's quiet, having a ski, then handing it back to the other users.

"They are taking something away from us which is very valuable."

He said he believed it would create a "museum or mausoleum" instead of somewhere for people to enjoy themselves.

Campaigners say they are bemused by the limit, saying all that is needed is a managed solution which would involve powered craft users being looked after by a governing body.

They say they want to use just 1% of the Lake District and there is nowhere else to go and that the authorities will not discuss the issue.

Tony Kemp from Windermere Action Force believes the limit has not been properly thought out and will backfire.

He says boats being forced to travel below 10mph, which they are not designed to do, will create 3ft or 4ft waves, creating problems for other users.

He believes power craft users will head back to three other lakes - Coniston, Ullswater and Derwentwater - where there is also a 10mph limit but public rights of navigation, and the authorities will have to manage four instead of one lake.

Mr Kemp believes the limit will be broken and a list of events for the coming year feature on WAF's website. He is in the process of appealing after being found guilty of breaking the speed limit on Coniston.

He said: "People are being criminalised in short for practising a healthy family sport.

"It is such a vibrant lake with people sailing, canoeing and waterskiing, having fantastic family fun and doing that at the same time in harmony.

"There's a lot of anguish, anger and bad feeling."

But the Lake District National Park Authority, which intends to enforce the limit by collecting evidence using digital video equipment, still cameras and a laser gun, believes it marks a new future for Windermere.

Authority spokesman Mick Casey said: "We are very confident about it. We have just produced a new management strategy for it.

"I think many people thought the arrival of jet skis took some of the shine off Windermere. With their departure, Windermere will once again start to be that jewel in the crown of the Lake District."

He stressed the limit, which only applies to power-propelled craft, was not a ban.

'Interfering with balance'

The bylaw was confirmed in 2000 following a public inquiry, but it was suspended for five years to give businesses time to adapt, the Authority said.

Friends of the Lake District's policy director Ian Brodie shares the view Windermere will be "restored to the heart of the Lake District".

He said the limit was needed to cut the disruption to other lake users, such as anglers and canoeists, and ensure their safety.

He said: "We are delighted for people who live around the lake.

"We expect Windermere to be as economically buoyant. I think there will be more people who come to Windermere because of the restoration of its special qualities."

But Tony Rothwell, managing director of boat firm Shepherds, says he has not expanded in the area over the last 10 years and is slimming down his Windermere base and four of his 28 staff have left this year, worried about prospects.

Mr Rothwell is a water-skier and a sailor and says both sports can go on without conflict.

He said: "They are interfering with the balance of the lake which has grown up naturally."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cumbria/4367999.stm
I have to say I'm biased against speed boats, because of the wash and the noise they create. The beauty of the Lake district can be ruined for hundreds of people by just a few noisy powerboats.
 

Min Bannister

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Sep 5, 2003
Messages
3,512
Likes
3,014
Points
184
#2
Weekends/evenings of being washed down by speedboats in Motherwell have given me little sympathy for speedboat/jetski users I'm afraid. They probably don't think they are doing any harm as they are using just one small part of the loch but the huge wash created spreads out across the whole loch, then comes back across again. For ages afterwards the whole loch is a sea of conflicting, crisscrossing waves. :nooo:
 

Leaferne

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Feb 7, 2004
Messages
2,733
Likes
50
Points
64
#3
Not to mention all the shoreline erosion caused by all those waves...

My personal pet peeve are those godawful jet-ski/Sea-Doo things; they make me briefly wish we didn't have gun laws in Canada. Nothing like enjoying a quiet afternoon at my sister's cottage, which is in a quiet bay, and then some teenage twa* comes along vrooming and spinning. (Then there are the local hicks floating slowly along in their bass boat, eight feet from the dock, casting their lines very near our feet...)
 

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,273
Likes
8,875
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#4
Leaferne said:
My personal pet peeve are those godawful jet-ski/Sea-Doo things..
They used to hire those out at a local beach. But after some accidents and near catatastrophes, the Council banned it! They're the sort of toy that mainly appeals to Chavs, and so it's hardly surprising they go larging it up, with little thought for others' safety or peace of mind.

I suffer a lot with traffic noise, etc, where I live. If I go to the coast or a lake, I just like to hear the wind and waves and the birds, not engines! Fast powerboats are a ghastly example of conspicuous consumption, of a resource the Earth is getting ever shorter of.

I support the Windermere speed limit because it does bring back tranquillity to a beautiful place, and by limiting fuel use it's also good for the planet (fewer CO2 emissions).
 

Leaferne

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Feb 7, 2004
Messages
2,733
Likes
50
Points
64
#5
OK, I already know this is a stupid question, but...are there a lot of bodies of water Over There suitable for recreational boating? (Over here, you can hardly move without falling into a lake) I know that some lakes here have been designated (by cottage owners/residents) "power-free", meaning no powered watercraft allowed. Am wondering if a similar ban for Windermere would result in people mewling that there weren't any other lakes they could go to for waterskiing etc.
 

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,273
Likes
8,875
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#6
Windermere is in the Lake District, a very beautiful part of the country, associated with Wordsworth, etc, and is a National Park. (It may even have been the first in UK...?)

All good reasons to keep it as 'natural' as possible. The skiiers and gas-guzzlers don't want to go elsewhere, but the fact is that one of them can piss off dozens of anglers, canoeists, sailors, birdwatchers, rowers, walkers, etc!

I guess in the end it comes down to providing the greatest pleasure for the greatest numbers.
 

drjbrennan

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Aug 14, 2001
Messages
311
Likes
11
Points
49
#7
I am mainly a walker/backpacker but when I'm by open water I hate to see the speedboats. The wetbike/seadoo machines are the most pointless, where I go to most often on the Conway, they don't even go out into the estuary, they buzz up and down and ruin it for every one else. At least proper motor boats GO somewhere, Isle of Man, Ireland or wherever.
 

Min Bannister

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Sep 5, 2003
Messages
3,512
Likes
3,014
Points
184
#8
Leaferne said:
OK, I already know this is a stupid question, but...are there a lot of bodies of water Over There suitable for recreational boating? (Over here, you can hardly move without falling into a lake) I know that some lakes here have been designated (by cottage owners/residents) "power-free", meaning no powered watercraft allowed. Am wondering if a similar ban for Windermere would result in people mewling that there weren't any other lakes they could go to for waterskiing etc.
Seem like the problem may be transferred elsewhere. To beautiful Loch Lomond in fact, due to encouragement from the Lake district water authority. :roll:

Key points
• Call for speed limit as water sports enthusiasts head north in response to restrictions in Lake District
• From today new laws on Lake Windermere will be enforced
• Currently on Loch Lomond a 10mph speed limit applies within 150 yards of the shore; on the open loch the speed limit is 50mph

Key quote
"I condemn any attempt to encourage people who use jet skis and similar equipment on Lake Windermere to come to Loch Lomond..." - Jack McConnell (Min-you tell 'em Jack)

Story in full SPEED restrictions must be placed on Loch Lomond to prevent an influx of power boats and jet-skiers from south of the Border, after new limits were imposed in the Lake District, campaigners warned yesterday.

Residents and regular visitors to Loch Lomond fear that the imposition of 6mph and 10mph limits on Windermere will result in watersports enthusiasts heading north.

Windermere is the last lake in Cumbria to have such restrictions imposed in an attempt to reclaim the tranquillity associated with the area. Although the limits were introduced in March 2000, the by-law to curb speeding has not been enforced until now. But, from today, park rangers will be on the lookout for anyone flouting the law.

Sara Clarke, the ranger manager, said speeding on Windermere should now become "as socially unacceptable as speeding on roads". But watersports enthusiasts claim the restrictions amount to a ban on power boats, which they say will seriously damage the local economy as water-skiers and other lake users are driven away.

They even claim some people have already moved their boats to Loch Lomond as a result of the ban, pointing out that it is one of the alternative water-ski and jet-ski venues recommended by the Lake District National Park Authority.

A fact sheet from the authority on the new Windermere speed limit states: "Lake users who feel unable to accept the 10mph by-law will have opportunities to enjoy their sports in: Barrow docks in Cumbria; Kielder Water in Northumberland; Loch Lomond in Scotland; and other venues."

The Friends of Loch Lomond (FLL) society renewed calls yesterday for action to prevent an increase in high-speed boating at the popular beauty spot.

The Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Authority Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Authority is still consulting on whether changes are needed to the by-laws which govern boat speeds on the loch, with 8 April the deadline for all interested parties to comment.

George Boyd, from Helensburgh, the FLL chairman, said the case for new restrictions was overwhelming.

"We understand there have been suggestions that people from Windermere come to Loch Lomond," he said. "Along with many other organisations, we’re already concerned about speed and control of the power boats and jet skis. We’re very unhappy with the position of jet skis, and we’re also concerned about the environment and what speed and overuse of the loch may bring about.

"The current restrictions are insufficient. They were all very well a generation ago, but the world has moved on, notwithstanding the changes at Lake Windermere.

"We’re pressing the park to change the by-laws to take account of speed, safety, equipment, competency, third-party insurance and to ensure there’s a tolerance of other users on and around the loch."

Angus Buchanan, 45, and his daughter Holly, 13, drowned on Loch Lomond two weeks ago, when a wave threw them from their rigid, inflatable dingy. One theory is that a wave from a power boat was responsible.

Jackie Baillie, the Labour MSP for Dumbarton, said she first raised her concerns with Jack McConnell in December. During First Minister’s Questions, she voiced the concerns of fishermen and walkers that the introduction of speed limits on Windermere would send speedboat owners and jet skiers to Scotland.

The First Minister said then: "I condemn any attempt to encourage people who use jet skis and similar equipment on Lake Windermere to come to Loch Lomond, or to depict the situation at Loch Lomond as being anything other than properly regulated."

He said responsibility for the by-laws rested with the park authority, although he urged them to complete the consultation process - and take any necessary action - "as quickly as possible".

Last night, no-one at the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Authority was available to comment officially.

However, a senior source within the authority said: "We are not overly concerned about an exodus of boats coming up from Windermere to partake in watersports and the like.

"The loch is already fully used and, on occasions, is actually over-subscribed. For starters, there would be no car-parking spaces for the thousands of watersports enthusiasts that we constantly hear are on the way."
From The Scotsman
 

filcee

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jun 12, 2002
Messages
517
Likes
5
Points
49
#9
Yes, I'm the one in twelve, I exist purely to p1ss off every other member of this esteemed board :)
Min:
They probably don't think they are doing any harm as they are using just one small part of the loch but the huge wash created spreads out across the whole loch, then comes back across again.
Leaferne:
Not to mention all the shoreline erosion caused by all those waves...
The fun part of wakeboarding / water skiing is jumping the wake. You can do this over the 2 foot or so wake behind our power boat, that is virtually gone by the time you get there, or on Windermere you can get behind the ferry that gives you a good four or five foot wake and lasts for ages :lol:
Rynner:
Fast powerboats are a ghastly example of conspicuous consumption, of a resource the Earth is getting ever shorter of.
A one gallon tank of unleaded will generally last us a full day of 'boarding, probably less than the diesel powered motor sailers, which will still be allowed to use the lake, use to get in and out of the launch area.
 
Top