Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

Ermintruder

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I submit that the idiotic idiom "We're on it" is an over-used / overquoted grating phrase of empty reductionist pap.

Subsequent use in a corporate setting (eg within public advertising campaigns) should result in the perpetrators being attacked with laser-guided batttlefield nuclear weapons.
 

Krepostnoi

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Americans also got to the bathroom, even if there isn't a bath in the room.
Even if there isn't a room. I remember reading one of those Reddit-style "Hikers! What's the weirdest thing you've encountered whilst hiking?" threads, and for me at least the answer was posters referring to "going to the bathroom against a tree". I mean, really.
 

Lord Lucan

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I have not read through all 38 pages of this thread, but another word that irks me relentlessly is 'keto'.
 

Lord Lucan

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Keto - referring to the Keto diet where one attempts to attain fat burning through ketosis achieved by the consumption of large amounts of protein/fat and little carbohydrate. Bad breath is a notorious side affect. It's been all the rage here for some time.
 

Swifty

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I hired my mate's son a few years back so we could work together in an Indian restaurant. I was the manager but was crap at it because I don't know much about Indian culture other than that senior Indian women in charge are respectfully called 'Auntie' .. so I knew that bit. My mate's son's Jamaican English, had grown up in Leicester and is more up on that side of things although every time the boss's sister (Indian lady in charge) asked him to do something, he'd say a word that sounds just like 'Angie' ..

I watched this for a while, wasn't sure what it meant but assumed it meant yes so made the mistake of saying one day "Who is this Angie bird and when does she start working for us?" .. it was only meant as a joke but the kitchen went quiet, my boss strolled over and quietly said "You're a piss taking twat aren't you." .. so I took my mate's son to one side a bit panicked and said "*****, what does 'Angie' mean?" .. he smiled and told me it's a more respectful way of saying "Yes" ..

They got there own back on me after they'd realised I wasn't deliberately trying to be rude by then calling me 'Jamus' .. Jamus was a joke from the Goodness Gracious Me TV show sketch when they had a white waiter in an Indian restaurant but Indian patrons couldn't be arsed to call him "James" :)

I got my P45 not much longer after that but to be fair to them, I was a bit crap at the job. Me and the Mrs have been invited back for a free meal since a few times and my mate's son is now a restaurant staff supervisor somewhere else.

Angie! ..

(Stuneville's trying to preserve bandwidth so please pretend I've just posted a vid of Angie by The Rolling Stones instead)
 

Mythopoeika

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I hired my mate's son a few years back so we could work together in an Indian restaurant. I was the manager but was crap at it because I don't know much about Indian culture other than that senior Indian women in charge are respectfully called 'Auntie' .. so I knew that bit. My mate's son's Jamaican English, had grown up in Leicester and is more up on that side of things although every time the boss's sister (Indian lady in charge) asked him to do something, he'd say a word that sounds just like 'Angie' ..

I watched this for a while, wasn't sure what it meant but assumed it meant yes so made the mistake of saying one day "Who is this Angie bird and when does she start working for us?" .. it was only meant as a joke but the kitchen went quiet, my boss strolled over and quietly said "You're a piss taking twat aren't you." .. so I took my mate's son to one side a bit panicked and said "*****, what does 'Angie' mean?" .. he smiled and told me it's a more respectful way of saying "Yes" ..

They got there own back on me after they'd realised I wasn't deliberately trying to be rude by then calling me 'Jamus' .. Jamus was a joke from the Goodness Gracious Me TV show sketch when they had a white waiter in an Indian restaurant but Indian patrons couldn't be arsed to call him "James" :)

I got my P45 not much longer after that but to be fair to them, I was a bit crap at the job. Me and the Mrs have been invited back for a free meal since a few times and my mate's son is now a restaurant staff supervisor somewhere else.

Angie! ..

(Stuneville's trying to preserve bandwidth so please pretend I've just posted a vid of Angie by The Rolling Stones instead)
So...the Rolling Stones were just saying 'thank you'?
 

Swifty

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I used to find people saying a sarcastic "not" amusing around the early 90's time Wayne's World came out .. people can't get away with saying it anymore I suppose .. but if they could? ..

"Mamma Mia 2 was even better than the first one! .. I can't wait for Mamma Mia 3! .. notttt."

The sarcastic "not" thing probably got over used and irritating to be fair although I'm sure nowhere near as irritating as people punctuating "like" in the middle of a sentence. I can't wait for that to, like, die out. If you don't count Shaggy in Scooby Doo saying it in earlier times, "like" has, like, long over stayed it's welcome. It's half a comma, half a hiccup.
 
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ChasFink

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The word "innit" used at the end of a sentence for no reason.
I always found "innit" rather amusing. Being one of those Americans who "go to the bathroom", even when there is no bath or room, I think it's probably because we don't really say it over here, so it hasn't taken on the air of an old worn out joke.

Does anybody remember a skit on Alias Smith and Jones, where the whole dialogue was 'Tuesday'?

Clever.

innit.
I assume you meant Alas Smith and Jones - Alias Smith and Jones was never a chucklefest, even when they tried to be funny.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I always found "innit" rather amusing. Being one of those Americans who "go to the bathroom", even when there is no bath or room, I think it's probably because we don't really say it over here, so it hasn't taken on the air of an old worn out joke.


I assume you meant Alas Smith and Jones - Alias Smith and Jones was never a chucklefest, even when they tried to be funny.
Particularly for Pete Duel who played Smith. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Duel
 

Mungoman

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I always found "innit" rather amusing. Being one of those Americans who "go to the bathroom", even when there is no bath or room, I think it's probably because we don't really say it over here, so it hasn't taken on the air of an old worn out joke.


I assume you meant Alas Smith and Jones - Alias Smith and Jones was never a chucklefest, even when they tried to be funny.
I stand corrected ChasFink - thanknyou.
 
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Y' get me? ...

For example "I'm tired" or "I'm hungry" , "Y' get me?" ..

I went to school so completely understand what the words tired or hungry mean, please stop trying to make yourself sound somehow deeper.

"I've never heard it that way before but now you've put it that way, yes .. yes I get you and not just an understanding of the words you've used but now also you yourself."
I don't much like this either, but I promise you it's in Wodehouse (can't remember which book). Bertie Wooster definitely utters the words "(such and such), d'you get me, Jeeves?"
I know; blew my mind as well!​
Do not get me started on, 'mixologist'...
This is also irritating, and yet, and yet....​
 
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EnolaGaia

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Here's a new bushel of words and phrases for you to despise ...

https://www.lssu.edu/banished-words-list/

The wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University have released LSSU’s 44th annual List of Words Banished from the Queen’s English for Mis-use, Over-use and General Uselessness.

“We grapple, litigate, and then yeet irritating words and phrases gathered from the nominations and votes received during 2018,” said an LSSU-OTUS thought leader from the word-banishment wheelhouse. “It’s the most important election of our time.”

LSSU’s word banishment tradition is now in its fifth decade, and was started by the late W. T. Rabe, a public relations director at Lake Superior State University. For every new year since 1976, LSSU — also known for premier programs in nursing, engineering, robotics, and Great Lakes freshwater research — has issued this list, firmly tongue in cheek. ...
 

INT21

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Here is a somewhat off-topic item. but it is related to the problem of languages.

I watched an item on the IQ test. and how it had been used across the nations to help assess the intelligence of their people. The actual program title was (as I recall) 'Why are Jews so clever'.

Anyway, the narrator talks about an instance when he (or a colleague), whilst in Africa, pulled out an English dictionary to look up a word. The locals he was with asked what the book was. and on being told, asked ' but your English, why do you need to have a book on English words ? We know all the words in our language'.

The point was, they had to know all the words as it was not a written language (Kikuyu). so the only way to keep the language was to hold it in their heads.

And it was why these people do so badly in many parts of the IQ test.

INT21.
 

Ermintruder

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And it was why these people do so badly in many parts of the IQ test.
This sounds like an entirely-false corollary.

True tests of intrinsic intelligence do so in ways that are totally-independant of language, whether vocabulary/syntax, or both.

I know of no evidence that would suggest the maintenance of language as an oral/ non-orthographic tradition is implicated in a group reduction in shared levels of intelligence.

There is little doubt that written communication does help facilitate the indirect interexchange of concepts/problem-solving/acceptance of standard formats (viz eg this very forum) but to conclude that this is a predicator of absolute intelligence would surely be a seriously-skewed case of confirmation bias.
 

Ermintruder

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Here's a new bushel of words and phrases for you to despise ...
What a curious piece of academic linguistic fascism. Whilst it's a harmless avocation for us, here, to idly make internalised pronouncements on language, for a university to actively-seek selective disestablishment of certain words & phrases: I'm speechless.

There's a time & a place for most of these denigrated examples, I reckon. Not a permanent exclusion.

Or am I being a sentimental old lingu-liberal in my unstructured defence of the right to write?
 
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