Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

Ermintruder

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The awful over-use of 'awsome' can oft be heard elsewhere in the Eenglish-speachin' world, far outside the good ole' US ofA.

I've never heard it used by Canadians (perhaps the Trudeau dynasty banned it) but it is especially-popular in African English, even amongst olds. My suspicion is that it may be compulsory in Australasia

[SATIRE]incidently, was there a toss of coin a long time ago, and 'Zealandia' didn't make the continental cut?[/SATIRE]
 
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Xanatic*

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There are many IQ test which have no written parts. Besides, knowing your whole language by heart would surely make you master it better than the guy who needs it written down. Assuming similar number of words in each language.
 

Swifty

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The awful over-use of 'awsome' can oft be heard elsewhere in the Eenglish-speachin' world, far outside the good ole' US ofA.

I've never heard it used by Canadians (perhaps the Trudeau dynasty banned it) but it is especially-popular in African English, even amongst olds. My suspicion is that it may be complusory in Australasia

[SATIRE]incidently, was there a toss of coin a long time ago, and 'Zealandia' didn't make the continental cut?[/SATIRE]
I think people like Sir David Attenborough should be allowed to still say "awesome" for obvious reasons. Someone describing their newest smart phone on line who calls it awesome needs to take a look at themselves.
 

catseye

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I think there's two different meanings of 'do you get me'. The Jeeves and Wooster one, which is the old form, in which someone directs it to a subordinate in a 'do you understand that this is exactly as I have specified?' And the modern 'd'you ge' me?' which is practically synonymous with 'd'you feel me?' and 'yeah?' which just invites the listener to corroborate the speaker.

My current pet hate is 'Imma'. It's not so bad in speech, where the ear sort of fills in the missing words, but written down is just ugly.
 

Swifty

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I think there's two different meanings of 'do you get me'. The Jeeves and Wooster one, which is the old form, in which someone directs it to a subordinate in a 'do you understand that this is exactly as I have specified?' And the modern 'd'you ge' me?' which is practically synonymous with 'd'you feel me?' and 'yeah?' which just invites the listener to corroborate the speaker.

My current pet hate is 'Imma'. It's not so bad in speech, where the ear sort of fills in the missing words, but written down is just ugly.
Innit.
 

INT21

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Ermintruder,

...This sounds like an entirely-false corollary.

True tests of intrinsic intelligence do so in ways that are totally-independant of language, whether vocabulary/syntax, or both
. ...

Do you think you would be at your present level of knowledge and reasoning if the only access to the past was via the accounts and stories that were passed down mouth to mouth over the years ?

A simple example would be that if one day your local commute train time table was changed. With no written language, how would you know if no one told you directly ?

If you had no way of going back and looking up a record of what was actually done or said at some time.

The old saying 'It is written' wouldn't mean a thing.

The item was not questioning the intelligence of the people concerned as it applied to their society and their way of life. It allowed them to function as members.

The IQ test was designed really for use in a normal western society where people's knowledge was relevant to the thins they had to do to get along. Reading records of the past greatly enhanced their abilities; as it still does.

INT21
 
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I think there's two different meanings of 'do you get me'. The Jeeves and Wooster one, which is the old form, in which someone directs it to a subordinate in a 'do you understand that this is exactly as I have specified?' And the modern 'd'you ge' me?' which is practically synonymous with 'd'you feel me?' and 'yeah?' which just invites the listener to corroborate the speaker.

My current pet hate is 'Imma'. It's not so bad in speech, where the ear sort of fills in the missing words, but written down is just ugly.
Yes, you're right; I suppose there is a difference. Nevertheless I was surprised to hear it in a Wodehouse story as a bit of 1920's / 30's slang. As we all know, trendy colloquialisms tend to go away then resurface - hence the resurgence of 'cool', 'fab' and 'funky' and calling people 'man' which nobody 'cool' would've contemplated as relatively recently as the late 70's for fear of being taking for a hippy - yet today these usages are ubiquitous. See also the high probability of being addressed (as a man) as 'mush' or 'geezer' during the New Lad / 'Loaded' culture craze of the 1990s as if it were some time in the much-maligned 1950s.

Speaking of the 1950s there was quite a lot of proto-innitism as in 'well, there ain't much point doing that now, is it', or 'that don't look too clever, do it?'. A friend of mind has a vocal tick where he'll agree with a statement made by an interlocutor with, "D'yerknowwhatimean?"

'Imma' drives me up the wall. I know someone who does this all the time as in, "Imma buy that". I try to bite my tongue, get me.
 
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Cis...as in Cis male.

My gender and sex is male - it does not need an interpretation predicated on somebody elses transgender.

If people want to be known as transgender - that is fine with me.
I agree, a person is female, male or intersex. People can change their gender if they wish, in which case they are transgender and can be referred to as either a transman/woman or just a man or woman. There's no need to reconfigure 99%+ of humanity.
 
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there's no I in team
Years ago I was 'on site' working in a power station, and a fresh faced prick manager used this phrase and a large bluff boiler-suited fellow said "There's a 'u' in c*nt though."

You know when you really really want to laugh but you really really mustn't...
 

Ladyloafer

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From my personal job hunting files I've seen some fairly nauseating phrases and sentences, and words that just should never be used together;

'and you won’t just be a Sales person, you'll be an entrepreneur, marketing expert and dream weaver'


'Walk with a Purpose; Be Humble, Stay Hungry'

' Number Conductor '- the job was bookkeeper

'create great rapport – that doesn’t mean just talking for England, but bants helps.'


If I never see the phrase 'brand ambassador' again it won't be soon enough.
 

Ermintruder

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From my personal job hunting files I've seen some fairly nauseating phrases and sentences
I am particularly put-off by the requirement to have "passion" for one's job. Unless a sculptor, or perhaps an artist working with canvas & oils, I really feel that having a 'passion' for eg selling over-salty cheap gunk-filled pastries should be a reason for enforced commital to an institution rather than an employment criterion.

All these poisoned superlatives are so...self-extinguishing.

Staff must be 'excited'...'driven'...'aware'. In effect, only hyper-active lion tamers on amphetamines need apply.
 

Ermintruder

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...cf "product associate".

Or "cast member" when they're selling inflatable footstools shaped like Ariel from The Little Mermaid.

Or....'sommelier' (someone who appears to be employed purely to be thin and disdainful regarding the relative ignorance of customers in the context of wine and the whole pantomime of wining)
 

EnolaGaia

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I am particularly put-off by the requirement to have "passion" for one's job. Unless a sculptor, or perhaps an artist working with canvas & oils, I really feel that having a 'passion' for eg selling over-salty cheap gunk-filled pastries should be a reason for enforced commital to an institution rather than an employment criterion.
All these poisoned superlatives are so...self-extinguishing.
Staff must be 'excited'...'driven'...'aware'. In effect, only hyper-active lion tamers on amphetamines need apply.
It happens in both directions nowadays ... It grates on my nerves when a (typically younger) applicant peppers his / her interview responses with the same over-the-top jargon. I can't figure out if the applicant is dumb enough to buy into the implied semantics or manipulative enough to think it'll impress me / us. Either way, I take it as negative.
 

Ladyloafer

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I am particularly put-off by the requirement to have "passion" for one's job. Unless a sculptor, or perhaps an artist working with canvas & oils, I really feel that having a 'passion' for eg selling over-salty cheap gunk-filled pastries should be a reason for enforced commital to an institution rather than an employment criterion.

All these poisoned superlatives are so...self-extinguishing.

Staff must be 'excited'...'driven'...'aware'. In effect, only hyper-active lion tamers on amphetamines need apply.
passion, urgh. bubbly is another. There are some jobs where this might be appropriate, but not selling sofas or hawking phones.

oh, and 'artist' meaning 'person'. Not creating art, or being artistic in any way. I saw a job once for 'artist in residence'. When you read the job description it was basically finger painting with toddlers, at a nursery school. With the crappy pay associated with such work.

:crazy:
 

Frideswide

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Or....'sommelier' (someone who appears to be employed purely to be thin and disdainful regarding the relative ignorance of customers in the context of wine and the whole pantomime of wining)
I believe we have gone to the same places!
 

Mythopoeika

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From my personal job hunting files I've seen some fairly nauseating phrases and sentences, and words that just should never be used together;

'and you won’t just be a Sales person, you'll be an entrepreneur, marketing expert and dream weaver'


'Walk with a Purpose; Be Humble, Stay Hungry'

' Number Conductor '- the job was bookkeeper

'create great rapport – that doesn’t mean just talking for England, but bants helps.'


If I never see the phrase 'brand ambassador' again it won't be soon enough.
Adverts like that are why self-employment looks so appealing.
 
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