Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

Swifty

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passion, urgh. bubbly is another. There are some jobs where this might be appropriate, but not selling sofas or hawking phones.

oh, and 'artist' meaning 'person'. Not creating art, or being artistic in any way. I saw a job once for 'artist in residence'. When you read the job description it was basically finger painting with toddlers, at a nursery school. With the crappy pay associated with such work.

:crazy:
I went to a job interview about 25 years ago that was so far up it's own arse, I had no idea what I was being interviewed for .. I'm still none the wiser, three people in front of me using as many long words as possible and just as many syllables ..

"A contemporary widow has opened with the opportunity to liaison co ordinate with a multi disciplinary team occasionally fragmented via seasonal needs via vocational projection requirement goals that blah blah blah blah blah blah ..."

I think the might have even been taking the piss because I was young ..

"Do you have any questions?"

"Yes .. erm .. what actually is this job for and what would I be doing?"

I didn't get the job, whatever it was. I expect it was probably something to do with the council.
 

Mythopoeika

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I went to a job interview about 25 years ago that was so far up it's own arse, I had no idea what I was being interviewed for .. I'm still none the wiser, three people in front of me using as many long words as possible and just as many syllables ..

"A contemporary widow has opened with the opportunity to liaison co ordinate with a multi disciplinary team occasionally fragmented via seasonal needs via vocational projection requirement goals that blah blah blah blah blah blah ..."

I think the might have even been taking the piss because I was young ..

"Do you have any questions?"

"Yes .. erm .. what actually is this job for and what would I be doing?"

I didn't get the job, whatever it was. I expect it was probably something to do with the council.
Social services? Sounds like that.
 

Ladyloafer

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Charming expression I saw on a job description yesterday was "Moving and handling of service users".

Never fills me with confidence.
'service users' is a uncomfortable turn of phrase too imho. clients, customers, patients, even attendees all sound nicer (depending on the situation).
 

Ogdred Weary

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I went to a job interview about 25 years ago that was so far up it's own arse, I had no idea what I was being interviewed for .. I'm still none the wiser, three people in front of me using as many long words as possible and just as many syllables ..

"A contemporary widow has opened with the opportunity to liaison co ordinate with a multi disciplinary team occasionally fragmented via seasonal needs via vocational projection requirement goals that blah blah blah blah blah blah ..."

I think the might have even been taking the piss because I was young ..

"Do you have any questions?"

"Yes .. erm .. what actually is this job for and what would I be doing?"

I didn't get the job, whatever it was. I expect it was probably something to do with the council.
Sounds like it could be "marketing" or sales, the two interviews that I had for those positions were the most painful I've ever experienced.
 

Frideswide

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I know I could not do a marketing sales position. I can sell a cause, lead a movement etc. But trying it on something where I'm not fervent about it? Total fail :(

Kudos to those who can!
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
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'service users' is a uncomfortable turn of phrase too imho. clients, customers, patients, even attendees all sound nicer (depending on the situation).
In one of my training sessions I look at Assisted Living and finding a Support Worker.

Can see the audience having lightbulb moments when you turn it around and instead of Service User they become Employer! :bthumbup:
 

Shady

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We use service users, as a term for the people we look after in a nursing/residential home, I think it is very impersonal, and I guess a mover and handler is a carer
 

Naughty_Felid

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We use service users, as a term for the people we look after in a nursing/residential home, I think it is very impersonal, and I guess a mover and handler is a carer
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1116090/

In these days of public involvement and active participation, has the term “patient” become an offensive anachronism or does it capture what is positive about the special relationship between health workers and ill people? A former chairman of the Patients’ Association and a clinician argue for and against “patients...”

I hate the term 'client" and "service user"

The trouble with this world is there are too many people with too much power who change things without consulting the rest of us.
 
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But 'TV Shows' is American, surely 'telly programs' would be more British. I think using Series to describe the entire program and season to describe each run is a good way to word it.
Ah, but we'd talk about 'a programme on the telly', not a 'telly program'. We like to be difficult, and you know we can't resist waving the flag for our insane (and correct) spelling ;) God save the Queen.

Our grammar is far from perfect; a Brit actor might boast, "I did a telly the other day". It's obvious what this means, but to an overseas student of English it might sound like they'd had sex with a television, or smashed one up with a cricket racquet.

Yes, there are semantic arguments to be had about the definitions of 'show', 'series' and 'serial' which will have to wait if anyone's still interested.

Alright then ...

The terminology isn't that different over here - it's just that we've decided to give 'series' that double meaning.

Generally speaking in the UK, a series describes one production cycle ( of however many episodes - AKA a 'season' ) of a show / programme ( also called a 'series' - meaning the overall production - the two meanings being easily distinguished by context ) consisting of pretty much self-contained episodes, whereas a 'serial' (not used as much nowadays * ) usually describes a show such as a crime drama or long-running soap opera in which storylines span multiple episodes and grow and expire, or are resolved, according to the whims of writers and producers.

By 'self-contained episodes' I'm thinking mainly of sitcom series in which each little story can stand as a teleplay in its own right, as such episodes tend to have a quick three-act structure within the 'sit', with callbacks and setups for future eps being allowed. A good sitcom should be easily enjoyed even if the viewer's missed out on the character introductions and often tedious exposition in the first episode or two. Sorry, am getting carried away with comedy hobbyism, which is by no means relevant to a minor transatlantic war of the words..

[WYBGE2EOC?:] ** In other words one might buy or download the first series of 'Shut Yer Gob' - which is in itself a series of several series. It's all completely logical, honest.

I can see some sense to the US 'season' convention. The joke about the backward friend who watches 'series' rather than 'seasons' is simply about snobbery and vapid middle-class posturing - and Britishers' attempts to sound cool by adopting Americanisms ... which also happens in reverse to a lesser extent, though in these lands constantly saying American stuff is often indicative of an attempt to appear young when that particular timeship has sailed - see Alan Partridge, et al - which is why I dislike my compatriots suddenly going on about 'seasons' ... it's not that there's anything intrinsically wrong with the usage I guess suppose.

Sorry for Britsplaining :) You'll notice I've apologised at least twice, as is my people's custom. Sorry.

* I think 'continuing drama' is the current term.

** "Would you be good enough to elucidate, old chap?" - English for TL;DR
 
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Ladyloafer

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Ah, but we'd talk about 'a programme on the telly', not a 'telly program'. We like to be difficult, and you know we can't resist waving the flag for our insane (and correct) spelling ;) God save the Queen.

Our grammar is far from perfect; a Brit actor might boast, "I did a telly the other day". It's obvious what this means, but to an overseas student of English it might sound like they'd had sex with a television, or smashed one up with a cricket racquet.

Yes, there are semantic arguments to be had about the definitions of 'show', 'series' and 'serial' which will have to wait if anyone's still interested.

Alright then ...

The terminology isn't that different over here - it's just that we've decided to give 'series' that double meaning.

Generally speaking in the UK, a series describes one production cycle ( of however many episodes - AKA a 'season' ) of a show / programme ( also called a 'series' - meaning the overall production - the two meanings being easily distinguished by context ) consisting of pretty much self-contained episodes, whereas a 'serial' (not used as much nowadays * ) usually describes a show such as a crime drama or long-running soap opera in which storylines span multiple episodes and grow and expire, or are resolved, according to the whims of writers and producers.

By 'self-contained episodes' I'm thinking mainly of sitcom series in which each little story can stand as a teleplay in its own right, as such episodes tend to have a quick three-act structure within the 'sit', with callbacks and setups for future eps being allowed. A good sitcom should be easily enjoyed even if the viewer's missed out on the character introductions and often tedious exposition in the first episode or two. Sorry, am getting carried away with comedy hobbyism, which is by no means relevant to a minor transatlantic war of the words..

[WYBGE2EOC?:] ** In other words one might buy or download the first series of 'Shut Yer Gob' - which is in itself a series of several series. It's all completely logical, honest.

I can see some sense to the US 'season' convention. The joke about the backward friend who watches 'series' rather than 'seasons' is simply about snobbery and vapid middle-class posturing - and Britishers' attempts to sound cool by adopting Americanisms ... which also happens in reverse to a lesser extent, though in these lands constantly saying American stuff is often indicative of an attempt to appear young when that particular timeship has sailed - see Alan Partridge, et al - which is why I dislike my compatriots suddenly going on about 'seasons' ... it's not that there's anything intrinsically wrong with the usage I guess suppose.

Sorry for Britsplaining :) You'll notice I've apologised at least twice, as is my people's custom. Sorry.

* I think 'continuing drama' is the current term.

** "Would you be good enough to elucidate, old chap?" - English for TL;DR
lol. I love how this make no sense and yet perfect sense too ;)

I've always thought the main difference is that an american season does last at least as long as a season of the year eg at least 13 episodes, whereas a british series is lucky to get 6 episodes.

except this is not accurate for many series...so...?

And what about programmes like casualty which go on forever. yet are not technically soaps? and then you've got programmes like Morse/Inspector Morse. imdb lists 12 seasons but that is 33 episodes!

There was a line in american series The Good Place (season 1) where Tahani is making Eleanor watch a terrible British sitcom and she says (something like) 'this is one of Britain's most beloved programmes, it ran for 16 years. They made almost 30 episodes you know!'
 
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