Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

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...I've always thought the main difference is that an american season does last at least as long as a season of the year eg at least 13 episodes, whereas a british series is lucky to get 6 episodes...
I'd always assumed that the 'season' thing had something to do with the number of adverts. You start watching Ep 1 of a new drama while absent-mindedly peeling the sunburned skin off your arm after a nice day at the beach, and by the time you're at the end of Ep 2 you've only watched 90 minutes of actual show, but it's minus 12 outside and there's a polar bear going through your bloody bins.
 

Rahere

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Does anyone else have a problem with Weeknights, un-hyphenated? I just persistently get the image of Sir Didymus...dog and all.
Whereby hangs a tail
They get to the local alehouse, and it's tippling down with rain. So they enter, and Mine Host complains that they should never have sent a knight out on a dog like that...
 

Krepostnoi

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'Cofficionado' - Kenco can go and **** themselves.
I hate that word so much.
Is that terrible Thorntons advert still running? The one with the tag-line "The art of the chocolatier"? It's a not a bad tag-line, in and of itself. Not great, granted, but not terrible. However. Whoever it was who asked Joanna Lumley to pronounce it in some sort of assumed English way: "Chock-a-le-TEA-er", like a Dumas character who didn't quite make the cut - oh, who am I kidding? Anyone who has never encountered "chocolatier" (a French word, because the bloody English don't understand anything kitchen-related after about 9.30am) isn't going to have heard of Dumas... But the half-arsed attempt at demotic pronunciation just makes me weep - did Xander down at the ad agency reckon that the Greggs demographic is just too thick to figure out what shoc-au-LAH-tea-ay might mean, never mind that they have just sat through an advert for, um, chocolates? Condescending arseholes, everyone involved. :chain:
 

Ogdred Weary

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Is that terrible Thorntons advert still running? The one with the tag-line "The art of the chocolatier"? It's a not a bad tag-line, in and of itself. Not great, granted, but not terrible. However. Whoever it was who asked Joanna Lumley to pronounce it in some sort of assumed English way: "Chock-a-le-TEA-er", like a Dumas character who didn't quite make the cut - oh, who am I kidding? Anyone who has never encountered "chocolatier" (a French word, because the bloody English don't understand anything kitchen-related after about 9.30am) isn't going to have heard of Dumas... But the half-arsed attempt at demotic pronunciation just makes me weep - did Xander down at the ad agency reckon that the Greggs demographic is just too thick to figure out what shoc-au-LAH-tea-ay might mean, never mind that they have just sat through an advert for, um, chocolates? Condescending arseholes, everyone involved. :chain:
Not seen that advert but it reminds me of trailers or TV spots for Chocolat which had one of those gruff "trailer voice men" that all trailers used to have once upon a time, pronouncing "chocolat" in an American accent, which was hilarious.
 

Shady

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I didn't know that Thorntons make Nutella, and those lil crispy nutty chocolate balls in the gold wrappers I can never spell, until I was looking at their website for a job
 

Rahere

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Lumley was just ripping her earlier ad for Cadbury's Flake off. How the hell we managed to get away with that one is anybody's guess (I was in the Group Treasury at the time). Her cousin, in passing, was the HQ Accountant, so it was kind of family. I did make amends when I was moved from there to Brussels: our office was the other end of the Sablon Square from Marcolini's, and the first Pain Quotidien shop opened at the same time half way between. Sometimes, as in the parallel thread on Leeds, one inspiration fires another and everything which follows succeeds. Being Belgian, I made the first coffee in WEU, and added speculoos biscuits in the best Dutch-Belgian tradition. That took on in the diplomatic HQ of Europe, and the rest is history. Honestly, Ambassador...
 

Ladyloafer

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I didn't know that Thorntons make Nutella, and those lil crispy nutty chocolate balls in the gold wrappers I can never spell, until I was looking at their website for a job
Ferrero rocher make nutella and , erm, ferrero rochers and thorntons is now owned by ferrero. So they don't really make it as such.
Incidentally ever since I heard the, probably untrue, aspersion that FR pronounce nutella as noo-teller then that it what I call it. Made from noots dontcha know!
 

Ladyloafer

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I didn't know that Thorntons make Nutella, and those lil crispy nutty chocolate balls in the gold wrappers I can never spell, until I was looking at their website for a job
Ferrero rocher make nutella and , erm, ferrero rochers and thorntons is now owned by ferrero. So they don't really make it as such.
Incidentally ever since I heard the, probably untrue, aspersion that FR pronounce nutella as noo-teller then that it what I call it. Made from noots dontcha know!
 

Rahere

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As in, pissed as a noot?
Actually, it's origins live in WWII Italy, when the Germans stripped the place of food (they did the same to Belgium and France). Without sugar or chocolate, they became inventive, and used indigenous hazelnuts, which the Germans weren't interested in, because to them, they're pig-food.
And the French pronunciation is actually fairly close to Monty Python.
Sorry, I didn't intend to turn herpetological...
 
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Shady

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Ferrero rocher make nutella and , erm, ferrero rochers and thorntons is now owned by ferrero. So they don't really make it as such.
Incidentally ever since I heard the, probably untrue, aspersion that FR pronounce nutella as noo-teller then that it what I call it. Made from noots dontcha know!
Ahh i see said the blind man to his deaf daughter
 

Ladyloafer

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Ahh i see said the blind man to his deaf daughter
Clear as mud eh? :p

As in, pissed as a noot?
Actually, it's origins live in WWII Italy, when the Germans stripped the place of food (they did the same to Belgium and France). Without sugar or chocolate, they became inventive, and used indigenous hazelnuts, which the Germans weren't interested in, because to them, they're pig-food.
And the French pronunciation is actually fairly close to Monty Python.
Sorry, I didn't intend to turn herpetological...
No as in walnoots, brazil noots, peanoots and of course hazelnoots.:D

It makes no sense as a pronunciation anyway because the internets tell me 'nut' is not the italian word for nut. Maybe if spoken with a cliche italiano accent
'thatsa spicy hazelnoot'.
 

Coal

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1116090/

In these days of public involvement and active participation, has the term “patient” become an offensive anachronism or does it capture what is positive about the special relationship between health workers and ill people? A former chairman of the Patients’ Association and a clinician argue for and against “patients...”

I hate the term 'client" and "service user"

The trouble with this world is there are too many people with too much power who change things without consulting the rest of us.
A patient is sick or injured. It's involuntary and they need treatment.

A 'service user' is using up valuable services and is to be discouraged if possible.
 

Swifty

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'Sheeple' gets on my nerves a bit .. if I don't blindly agree to a conspiracy theory? .. I'm one of the sheeple .. it's more in the way it's delivered to be honest, as if each person who uses it does so with enormous pride and a conviction that the word itself delivered by itself is somehow a magic scathing rune stone that I would need to roll two of those weird shaped dice before I stand a chance of being able to just tell them to piss off instead.
 

Ladyloafer

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I'm not sure it is meant to mean invisible, more like you can see the way through (or up,) the career ladder but can't get to it (because the glass is in the way). Breaking through that glass is just that bit harder than if you could just wander in. or somthing.
 
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