Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

ShadyCavalier

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Is that terrible Thorntons advert still running? The one with the tag-line "The art of the chocolatier"? It's a not a bad tag-line, in and of itself. Not great, granted, but not terrible. However. Whoever it was who asked Joanna Lumley to pronounce it in some sort of assumed English way: "Chock-a-le-TEA-er", like a Dumas character who didn't quite make the cut - oh, who am I kidding? Anyone who has never encountered "chocolatier" (a French word, because the bloody English don't understand anything kitchen-related after about 9.30am) isn't going to have heard of Dumas... But the half-arsed attempt at demotic pronunciation just makes me weep - did Xander down at the ad agency reckon that the Greggs demographic is just too thick to figure out what shoc-au-LAH-tea-ay might mean, never mind that they have just sat through an advert for, um, chocolates? Condescending arseholes, everyone involved. :chain:
I enjoyed your rant, but perhaps she thought it was non-U to pronounce it as the French do.
 
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I've always thought the main difference is that an american season does last at least as long as a season of the year eg at least 13 episodes, whereas a british series is lucky to get 6 episodes.

except this is not accurate for many series...so...?

And what about programmes like casualty which go on forever. yet are not technically soaps? and then you've got programmes like Morse/Inspector Morse. imdb lists 12 seasons but that is 33 episodes!

There was a line in american series The Good Place (season 1) where Tahani is making Eleanor watch a terrible British sitcom and she says (something like) 'this is one of Britain's most beloved programmes, it ran for 16 years. They made almost 30 episodes you know!'
:) It's true; some British sitcoms might have one series / season every year or every other year of only six episodes (or even five in the case of one series of Ever Decreasing Circles). A weird consequence of this is that the cast sometimes appear noticeably older from one run to the next.

Still, British television execs are usually less ruthless than their US counterparts when it comes to axing shows - they'll usually give a first series a chance (as traditionally it will be in the can before broadcast rather than written and produced according to a weekly schedule). Often a pilot is not taken up, but I can't recall a British sitcom (for example) being given the chop after two episodes.
 

maximus otter

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Whoever it was who asked Joanna Lumley to pronounce it in some sort of assumed English way: "Chock-a-le-TEA-er", like a Dumas character who didn't quite make the cut - oh, who am I kidding? Anyone who has never encountered "chocolatier" (a French word, because the bloody English don't understand anything kitchen-related after about 9.30am) isn't going to have heard of Dumas... But the half-arsed attempt at demotic pronunciation just makes me weep...
I shall issue instructions that all the people of Britain must pronounce all French words exactly as a Frenchman would.

This will be obeyed by every Brit from Londres to Édimbourg.

maximus otter
 

Ermintruder

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This will be obeyed by every Brit from Londres to Édimbourg
Zut alors! Saved by my (current) extreme northerness.

A frequent expression in Scots English from my childhood was the term "a fox's paw", which was a phonetic (calque? No, that's not the proper grammatical term...help me someone, is is an eggcorned mondegreen?) for the French expression faux pas.

Its meaning could mean the same as in French (cf an embarrassing or tactless act or remark in a social situation) but also extended into meaning a very-problematic mistake. It was considered to be a type of proper swearing in our house and appeared to be a shared expression, as fellow inmates at my school used it too.

As I've said here before, I was brought up with the Lallans Scots word "ashets" for plates and crockery, which is directly from the French assiette. There is a lot of mangled mispronounced French in Scots...if I ever wake-up today, I'll try to remember some more.

The use of Scots alongside English happens on a barely-tolerated basis even now, and at school in the 60s it was beaten out of us every bit as assiduously as was the Gaelic. So every syllable of it is loaded.

Is it only in Scotland that the idom "pardon my French" is used, to excuse swearing in English? I've never heard it in any other form of Home Countries or Commonwealth English, or in British North America.
 

Ermintruder

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Ah! Mais oui....je comprends.

Mantenant "les goddams" similaire du "les rossbeefe"? C'est eau enchute de plumes du canard!!!

And that is quite enough Poirot for today, n'est pas?
 

EnolaGaia

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... Is it only in Scotland that the idom "pardon my French" is used, to excuse swearing in English? I've never heard it in any other form of Home Countries or Commonwealth English, or in British North America.
It's been used in American English since at least as early as the 19th century. I've heard and used it regularly for over 50 years.

It was even the title of a 1921 American comedy film.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0012546/?ref_=nv_sr_3
 

ShadyCavalier

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Re: season vs series: I always thought that Americans called a series a season because their programmes go on for so bloody long (i.e. spanning an entire calendar season). Meanwhile our big dramas tend to only last for 6-8 episodes at a time, perhaps due to our lack of budget and/or knack for restraint.
 

Ermintruder

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Poirot was Belgian, I don't like the character but to imply he was French is a step too far !
<whirr:click:stop:start:wait> But...I was just indicating he was a Francophone- wasn't I? That's all part of Hercule's famed I'm-not-a-Frenchman schtik.

I dunno- probably it's a good thing I didn't idly-quote any lyrics from Celine Dion's song 'Je Sais Pas'....je voudrais apprendre..? :)
 
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