Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

Floyd1

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And has anyone noticed how the phrase ` to be honest` is now randomly appended onto sentences in situations where the honesty of the speaker is neither here nor there?

So the correct use of this phrase would be in something like:

`I'm a bit of a binge drinker, to be honest`.

Here the speaker has admitted something that he/she is not particularly proud of - hence the reference to honesty. And yet now one hears exchanges such as the following:

`So, what you get up to at the weekend?`

`Oh, just went shopping, to be honest`
Now, okay, it may be that the speaker feels a bit of mild unease about not having gone skydiving or something on his/her weekend, but even so, we all go shopping from time to time on our weekends so there is hardly any shameful soul-baring going on here. The speaker could have just said:
`Oh, you know, nothing exciting I'm afraid. Just went shopping`.

But I'm hearing strnger constructions than that:
`I agree with you, to be honest` (When I have just said something that is not really controversial and nobody else is in earshot anyway). Or:

`It's pretty cold out there, to be honest` And so on.

Does the phrase just have a nice rhythm to it - or is something darker going on? Have we become so insecure in our dealings with our fellow man that every other utterance has to have an air of apology about it?

Anyway, rant over, to be honest.
''It's pretty cold out there, to be honest'' is definitely a strange one. You make a good point about feeling shame or guilt about not doing something more 'productive', and that's possibly why that is often said in those cases - (although I've always maintained that staring into space instead of climbing everest or whitewater rafting is a far superior pastime).
 

Lizard King

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"know what i'm saying",{which can be annoying in it's self,if someone says it every five sentences and there is no difficulty in understanding what they are saying}being replaced with"you feel me?".Which is "straight out of the hood".
 
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"Substance abuse". Can we please come up with something more precise? Substance abuse could mean using the wrong adhesive on your floor tiles! Of course "drug abuse" doesn't work, since no one thinks of cigarettes, booze, or coffee as drugs.
"Substance abuse" could be keeping a pot of glue in inhumane conditions.
 

maximus otter

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"Substance abuse". Can we please come up with something more precise? Substance abuse could mean using the wrong adhesive on your floor tiles! Of course "drug abuse" doesn't work, since no one thinks of cigarettes, booze, or coffee as drugs.
Oh yes. Far fewer PC euphemisms, please.

l’m sure l once heard a crack-addicted serial killer referred to as having “substance abuse issues and poor impulse control”.

maximus otter
 

Naughty_Felid

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"Substance abuse". Can we please come up with something more precise? Substance abuse could mean using the wrong adhesive on your floor tiles! Of course "drug abuse" doesn't work, since no one thinks of cigarettes, booze, or coffee as drugs.
Professionals do class them as drugs of abuse and they are always considered when coming up with a formulation.

There are whole services dedicated to people addicted to "booze."

There are whole services dedicated to nicotine addiction.

The reason "substance abuse" is used is there are many classes of drugs. Opioids, Benzodiazepines, Methamphetamines, Alcohol, etc. Yet most health teams are split into two groups those that deal with alcohol addiction and those that deal with opioid addiction.

Then there are other substance abuse drugs such as the hallucinogens.

People also use adhesives to get high too.

People who are addicted to certain substances usually don't take one type of substance they will take several - hence the umbrella term "substance abuse".
 
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ChasFink

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Let me be clear: I am well aware of all that Naughty_Felid mentions above. My beef is with the amazing lack of specificity in the words "substance" and "abuse". They're drugs, even if (like some glues) they aren't intended to be drugs. "Drug abuse" would get the point across if so many people didn't have a limited view of what drugs are. But when you remove the word "drug" and add the word "substance" you broaden the sense of "abuse" from "ingesting inappropriately" to "using in any way not considered normal". Painting your car without a proper primer? Abusing the substance car paint. Using orange marmalade as shaving cream? Abusing the substance orange marmalade. But these aren't what people mean by substance abuse. If we can't say drug abuse then we need a better and more specific term.

And don't get me started on the term "affimative action".
 

hunck

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Since when did 'Cockney Rhyming Slang' involve you in saying both parts. My grandad didn't put on his 'Whistle and Flute' , he put on his Whistle' The whole point (like Polari) was that outsiders weren't supposed to understand, and if you say the whole phrase its pretty obvious.

To give other examples , ' I browned him' means 'I killed him'. 'I'm off down the rubber' means 'I'm going down the pub'.
Off-topic to the thread but re rhyming slang:

I like Aris, a sort of 'rhyming slang once removed'. Aris being short for Aristotle, which rhymes with Bottle, short for Bottle & Glass, rhyming slang for Arse. It also sounds very similar to it's meaning.
 

Mungoman

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Off-topic to the thread but re rhyming slang:

I like Aris, a sort of 'rhyming slang once removed'. Aris being short for Aristotle, which rhymes with Bottle, short for Bottle & Glass, rhyming slang for Arse. It also sounds very similar to it's meaning.
Khyber pass is arse, while aristotle is used on it's own in Australia for bottle - I've never heard 'ari' used.

It must be a Lahnd'n thing.
 

Ermintruder

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"I love you to the moon and back..."
Well, even if you just liked me a bit, I would vastly-prefer it if you would cease & desist from using over-using vacuous, hackneyed, glib, pseudometaphoric statements, such as this one.

It wasn't acceptable printed on a cheap Valentine's card back in 1992, and it sure as sick-bowls isn't acceptable all over the damn place, now (I see this BS phrase at least twice a day, on Fakebook, and more than once a week on tv)

Think once
Think twice
Think... don't mindlessly-parrot apoetic bollox on the basis that it sounds vaguely-profound
 

EnolaGaia

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Has anyone mentioned "reach out" instead of call or contact? Of course someone has in 49 pages, but this is funny. ...
Yes - it was mentioned back in August 2018.

I'm not sure why you find it objectionable. To "reach out" (at least in American parlance) means something more abstract or general than "call" or "contact". It can carry connotations of (e.g.) "offer a place of participation to" or "appeal for input / assistance to" that would seem trite if boiled down to "give X a call".
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Yes - it was mentioned back in August 2018.

I'm not sure why you find it objectionable. To "reach out" (at least in American parlance) means something more abstract or general than "call" or "contact". It can carry connotations of (e.g.) "offer a place of participation to" or "appeal for input / assistance to" that would seem trite if boiled down to "give X a call".
'Reach out' sounds ridiculous in a British accent - it's always used in place of 'get in touch' over here and it really winds me up.
 

Ermintruder

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and it really winds me up
Ditto snap.

I'm not sure >why< it sounds so objectionable to my British ears (nor why it apparently is interpreted in so much less of a loaded fashion in the USA).

But the UK and the extended Commonwealth are becoming more American by the hour....so eventually it won't hurt anymore.
 

Yithian

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'Reach out' sounds ridiculous in a British accent - it's always used in place of 'get in touch' over here and it really winds me up.
Might I add that I really despise the smarmy use of the phrase by journalists when informing the reader that the subject of their writing wasn't interested in talking to them.

At the end of a a thousands words of brutal character assassination:

We reached out to X for comment, but at the time of writing we have received no response.
 

Yithian

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Yes - it was mentioned back in August 2018.

I'm not sure why you find it objectionable. To "reach out" (at least in American parlance) means something more abstract or general than "call" or "contact". It can carry connotations of (e.g.) "offer a place of participation to" or "appeal for input / assistance to" that would seem trite if boiled down to "give X a call".
Oh, that's part of why I hate it!

It conveys a moral tone.

It's either:

We really have striven to reach this poor benighted/wretched individual because we are so charitable and morally virtuous and will overlook the fact that he is a bad human being.

Or

We tried, we really did try to get this person to help us. We gave them every chance to put his side of the argument, but he simply blanked us--what more can one do in dealing with such ghastly people?
 

hunck

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Khyber pass is arse, while aristotle is used on it's own in Australia for bottle - I've never heard 'ari' used.

It must be a Lahnd'n thing.
That's true - khyber is short rhyming slang for arse. Probably right that Bottle & Glass is a Lahnd'n variation.Would you ever ask for an Aristotle of beer? Bartender, give me an Aris at your convenience..
 
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