Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

Tempest63

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Khyber pass is arse, while aristotle is used on it's own in Australia for bottle - I've never heard 'ari' used.

It must be a Lahnd'n thing.
“Bottle” in rhyming slang is “bottle and glass” = Class. It was associated with boxing, i.e., “he’s got some bottle” or “he’s lost his bottle”.

May mean different things across various London boroughs but that was the meaning in Bermondsey/Walworth when I was growing up there.
 

Yithian

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“Bottle” in rhyming slang is “bottle and glass” = Class. It was associated with boxing, i.e., “he’s got some bottle” or “he’s lost his bottle”.

May mean different things across various London boroughs but that was the meaning in Bermondsey/Walworth when I was growing up there.
And the point being--and it seems this needs explaining as the dialect dies out--is that many words have a multi-word Cockney substitution, the last (usually second or third) of which rhymes with the word it is substituting, but you usually omit the rhyming word.

Hence:

Sit down and take the weight of your plates.

Plates of meat = feet.

I'll ram it right up his Khyber.

Khyber Pass = arse.

Come over here and have a butcher's.

Butcher's hook = look.

Mate, it's yours if you've got the bread.

Bread and Honey = money.

He walked in with a sheepish look and blood all over his boat.

Boat race = face.

There are many more recondite examples, of course.
 

hunck

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Khyber pass is arse, while aristotle is used on it's own in Australia for bottle - I've never heard 'ari' used.

It must be a Lahnd'n thing.
“Bottle” in rhyming slang is “bottle and glass” = Class. It was associated with boxing, i.e., “he’s got some bottle” or “he’s lost his bottle”.

May mean different things across various London boroughs but that was the meaning in Bermondsey/Walworth when I was growing up there.
Coincidentally I caught an episode of Steptoe & Son on the radio this eve & one of the old man's lines was about someone getting a boot up the Aris. The programme was from 1971.

It was also of it's time in as much as it featured a gay character trying to get off with Harold & the old man ranting about poofs & iron hoofs.
 

Mungoman

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'Butchers' is still used by people of my age - the alternative is a 'captain cook', and down here it's a 'cows hoof'.

The rest are used except for 'Bottle' - seeing as how it's boxing, I reckon we'd have our own colloquialism...one used here is 'ticker', as in 'he's got no ticker'.

Unfortunately, since the mid seventies, I've heard some sayings that are obviously new, and they just don't have that originality or wit. They've muddled them as well.

Once again, unfortunately.
 

maximus otter

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That’s because nobody has a Joanna at home anymore. Every home had one when photos only came in black and white
l believe that the system of hire purchase was devised in the early Victorian era, in order to allow the aspirational classes to be able to afford pianos.

maximus otter
 
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Cochise

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Khyber pass is arse, while aristotle is used on it's own in Australia for bottle - I've never heard 'ari' used.

It must be a Lahnd'n thing.
It is indeed. Aris instead of Arse.

BTW anyone who gives the whole rhyme - e.g. Apples and Pears (stairs) has failed to grasp the idea.
 

Yithian

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It is indeed. Aris instead of Arse.

BTW anyone who gives the whole rhyme - e.g. Apples and Pears (stairs) has failed to grasp the idea.
Random comment as your post elicited a memory. My father must have said 'up the wooden hills to Bedfordshire' a thousand times to my brother and me when we were young and I had no idea that it wasn't one of his (many) personal coinages.

 

Krepostnoi

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the old man ranting about poofs & iron hoofs.
Oh, that's joined a couple of dots for me, thank you. I remember hearing Danny Baker interviewing Mike "Don't you know who my brother is?" McGear a while back, and making great play of the - allegedly mysterious - line about the "Aintree Iron" in his song "Thank you very much." McGear insisted it was just a whimsical bit of wordplay with nothing behind it. I somehow formed the impression it was a less-than-flattering reference to Brian Epstein, but couldn't quite figure out exactly why. Now all becomes clear, and not to McGear's credit.

And, no, I didn't think I'd be sticking up for someone called Epstein's sexual preferences today of all days...
 

Mungoman

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Getting a boot up the Aris has me perplexed though - could it be a Harris...somethingorother?
Google is my friend it seems...

"Aris is one of the very best examples of Double Slang. This occurs where a phrase is turned into a rhyme, and later that rhyme is then turned into another rhyme.


In this case the phrase Bottle and Glass became rhyming slang for Artse. Then Bottle because Aristotle, which was finally shortened just to Aris."
 
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