Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,913
Reaction score
33,703
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
The use of the word "hack" to mean any kind of hint or suggestion is extremely annoying! It seems to be everywhere now, life hacks, DIY hacks, you name it, it's got a "hack". ...

This use of 'hack' (of which there are many, derived from different origins) is a spin on 'hacking' / 'hacker' (as in computer coding or intrusion). 'Hacking' originally referred to any creative coding, not just gaming a system to gain access. A 'hack' was a novel bit of code that accomplished something or resolved a problem. Such 'hacks' were recognized as such for their functionality in resolving an issue, not for their sophistication or elegance.

More recently, the derivative version of 'hack' (as you cited above) emerged to mean a novel procedure or tactic making things easier or resolving a minor inconvenience.

In this sense the 'hack' is not the tip or suggestion; it's the useful trick that the tip conveys.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,913
Reaction score
33,703
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
And then there's hack writers, who overuse the word.

That version of 'hack' comes from a different etymological lineage - originally referring to a horse used for ordinary or routine work. This allusion to routine work or drudgery carried over to refer to writers who churn out text of no particular merit on a routine basis.
 

Coastaljames

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
3,995
Reaction score
5,619
Points
214
Location
East Norfolk coast
I really, really dislike this, and you hear it everywhere these days from Radio 4 to the supermarket. I'm sure it has a fancy name that I don't know but it's the beginning a sentence with a positive and then going on to use the negative. And vice versa.


"Yeah, no..."

"No, yes...exactly that."


What is that nonsense and where did it begin? Absolutely everywhere now.
 

Souleater

I'm not a cat
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
4,679
Reaction score
8,192
Points
208
I really, really dislike this, and you hear it everywhere these days from Radio 4 to the supermarket. I'm sure it has a fancy name that I don't know but it's the beginning a sentence with a positive and then going on to use the negative. And vice versa.


"Yeah, no..."

"No, yes...exactly that."


What is that nonsense and where did it begin? Absolutely everywhere now.
Vicky Pollard?

 

Coastaljames

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
3,995
Reaction score
5,619
Points
214
Location
East Norfolk coast
Possibly.

But you hear it everywhere! As I said, you can hear it on a daily basis on Radio 4 - from academics, politicans, scientists...not your Vicky Pollard types. It just seems accepted now. But it's so dumb.
 

Coastaljames

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
3,995
Reaction score
5,619
Points
214
Location
East Norfolk coast
I can understand and excuse your Vicky Pollard's for talking like that. I don't get how it is now so widespread and accepted. Please note - I do not mean it being delivered in her timbre or accent...you hear it delivered from people who otherwise speak very fluently and precisely.
 

Peripart

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
6,436
Reaction score
5,183
Points
314
I can understand and excuse your Vicky Pollard's for talking like that... Please note - I do not mean it being delivered in her timbre or accent...you hear it delivered from people who otherwise speak very fluently and precisely.

Despite my reference to Dibley, I know what you mean, and once you notice it, it's everywhere.
 

Coastaljames

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
3,995
Reaction score
5,619
Points
214
Location
East Norfolk coast
It's nonsensical and sloppy.
 

Xanatic*

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,544
Reaction score
5,066
Points
214
I find it a bit sad how much media talks about Zoom calls right now, instead of video calls. I get that it is probably the most used system for it, but there is no reason to mention the brand name every time.
 

Tunn11

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Nov 23, 2005
Messages
92
Reaction score
147
Points
64
Location
Under the highest tree top in Kent
"Coming up"; in any TV programme. It means that the one hour programme will only be ten minutes once the adverts, repetitious use of the one graphic they comissioned, recaps of what they told you two minutes ago and endless "coming up"s are disounted.
A one hour documentary programme becomes in effect a longish news item.
And rather off topic, will someone please take away the director's drones? The number of pointless aerial shots is getting silly.
 

Austin Popper

Emperor of Antarctica
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
1,042
Reaction score
2,228
Points
159
Location
Colorado, where the gold is still elusive
Fortunately, it's apparently no longer cool to use "reach out" in place of call or contact. It was starting to seem like that particular turd was permanent.
 
Last edited:

Eponastill

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Aug 2, 2002
Messages
989
Reaction score
1,719
Points
169
Location
generally on the fringes
The current trend to turn nouns into verbs unnecessarily has gone too far (c.f. "Hamilton podiumed at the F1 race").
There was an advert for some women's sanitary product on tv the other day. The line was "A new way to period."
I give up. I am going to live in a cave now. Bye.
 

MorningAngel

Justified & Ancient
Joined
May 14, 2015
Messages
1,468
Reaction score
2,277
Points
164
The current trend to turn nouns into verbs unnecessarily has gone too far (c.f. "Hamilton podiumed at the F1 race").
There was an advert for some women's sanitary product on tv the other day. The line was "A new way to period."
I give up. I am going to live in a cave now. Bye.
Like ‘are you ready to Butlins?’ And ‘you ping pong’. I feel the hate for this too.
 

Souleater

I'm not a cat
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
4,679
Reaction score
8,192
Points
208
The current trend to turn nouns into verbs unnecessarily has gone too far (c.f. "Hamilton podiumed at the F1 race").
There was an advert for some women's sanitary product on tv the other day. The line was "A new way to period."
I give up. I am going to live in a cave now. Bye.
Antiquing (shopping for antiques) is a phrase which seems to have crept into the UK from the US, i first heard the phrase on 'Frasier'
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
33,544
Reaction score
43,155
Points
314
Location
HM The Tower of London
Antiquing (shopping for antiques) is a phrase which seems to have crept into the UK from the US, i first heard the phrase on 'Frasier'
Frasier ended in 2004 so it's been around for a while! :chuckle:
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
33,544
Reaction score
43,155
Points
314
Location
HM The Tower of London
It's good English. What about 'mushrooming', 'hurdling', 'wooding', 'ballooning' or even (gasp) 'shopping'?

'Cycling' was originally 'bicycling', which probably began as 'bicycle riding'.
 

Peripart

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
6,436
Reaction score
5,183
Points
314
That reminds me of one that annoys my mum. ‘I got it from a car boot’.

That's not too bad, compared with some. OK, so technically it should probably be "I got it from a pile of stuff on a trestle table next to a parked car", but boot is at least being used as a noun here!
 

Souleater

I'm not a cat
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
4,679
Reaction score
8,192
Points
208
That's not too bad, compared with some. OK, so technically it should probably be "I got it from a pile of stuff on a trestle table next to a parked car", but boot is at least being used as a noun here!
Technically it should be 'i purchased it from a car boot sale' or as we say dan saaf 'got it at a booty' :p
For those in the US a car boot sale is an open air market were people sell their old crap they no longer want from the trunk of their car (but usually a table next to their car), similar, i believe to a 'swap meet'.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
32,347
Reaction score
20,110
Points
314
The worst noun as verb is "impact", it's everywhere now, why didn't someone stop it before it was too late?!
 
Top