Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

catseye

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I had a long argument quite recently about 'off of'. Several of my writer friends hold that you can use 'off of' in the context 'he got the pillows off of the sofa' or 'she told the dog to get off of the chair'. I hold that simply the word 'off' is enough, but apparently it is also grammatically correct to say 'off of' if it's an action, rather than 'I got it off of the milkman' which is incorrect.

Don't blame me, I think it's 'off' and the 'of' is unnecessary, but there you go.
 

Mythopoeika

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Peripart

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I had a long argument quite recently about 'off of'. Several of my writer friends hold that you can use 'off of' in the context 'he got the pillows off of the sofa' or 'she told the dog to get off of the chair'. I hold that simply the word 'off' is enough, but apparently it is also grammatically correct to say 'off of' if it's an action, rather than 'I got it off of the milkman' which is incorrect.

Don't blame me, I think it's 'off' and the 'of' is unnecessary, but there you go.

"Off of" sounds completely wrong, and for that reason alone, I hope that it is wrong!

In the "milkman" example, the word to use is "from", not "off", in any case. Unless you were rescuing the milko from beneath a pile of dairy products, in which case it would make sense to say that you took the milk off him...
 

Coastaljames

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You hear people around here saying "you am" ("yow am", actually), but that doesn't make it right!

That wasn't my point. I was just thinking aloud that I've heard people use it.
 

Peripart

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That wasn't my point. I was just thinking aloud that I've heard people use it.

Indeed. And there's a big difference between spoken colloquialisms and written English. I'm actually quite fond of the local - ie B'ham and Black Country - way of speaking, though I still cringe when it's on national TV (unless it's Carl Chinn, of course)!
 

escargot

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We can argue about dialect 'til we're blue in the face but out won't change anything.
 

Lord Lucan

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Side Hustle - a phrase that seems to be creeping into everyday speech here more and more.

For example:

''What do you do for a job?''
''I'm a pilot for an international airline''
''That's great! But what's your side hustle?''

Ugh!.
 

escargot

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Facebook again. This time it's a 'man's huddy'... WHY DO THEY EVEN THINK THAT IS A WORD??
Do they mean 'hoodie', as in 'hooded sweatshirt'?

The correct name for that garment is indeed 'hooded sweatshirt'. Can remember when I first saw them advertised, in the NME in the late '70s. Pages of them, printed with rock band and singers' logos. Nobody called them 'hoodies' until later.
 

catseye

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Do they mean 'hoodie', as in 'hooded sweatshirt'?

The correct name for that garment is indeed 'hooded sweatshirt'. Can remember when I first saw them advertised, in the NME in the late '70s. Pages of them, printed with rock band and singers' logos. Nobody called them 'hoodies' until later.
They do, indeed, mean 'hoodie'. But it is clearly someone who has never EVER seen the word written down, even to the extent of seeing an advert, or all those mean-spirited posts on Facebook itself about all those 'hoodies' who seem to infest local towns. How dare they hang around parks, eating ice creams and walking about!

But honestly, 'huddy'? Seriously?
 

catseye

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"Off of" sounds completely wrong, and for that reason alone, I hope that it is wrong!

In the "milkman" example, the word to use is "from", not "off", in any case. Unless you were rescuing the milko from beneath a pile of dairy products, in which case it would make sense to say that you took the milk off him...
Unless it's a disease. In which case 'I caught a cold off the milkman' is perfectly acceptable in speech.
 
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