Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

escargot

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They do, indeed, mean 'hoodie'. But it is clearly someone who has never EVER seen the word written down, even to the extent of seeing an advert, or all those mean-spirited posts on Facebook itself about all those 'hoodies' who seem to infest local towns. How dare they hang around parks, eating ice creams and walking about!

But honestly, 'huddy'? Seriously?
Interestingly though, through the powers of language and phonetic spelling, I knew what 'huddy' meant even though I'd never seen it written and it was stripped of context.
 

escargot

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Makes me think tho...what is "real" English? "Correct" English?
We pick that up that when we learn to speak, the same way as we know the order of adjectives. :cool:

Language is powerful. Control of its use is a way of marking out who is important and who is not.

Criticising others' use of language whether it's written or spoken, or formal or colloquial, or dialect or Received Pronunciation or whatever is a way of asserting superiority.

Have to say that seeing people squabbling over whether the name for little kids' indoor sports shoes is pumps or daps is rather sad.

And yup, we have had that very discussion on this message board. :chuckle:
 

Nosmo King

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Dunlop plimsolls in my day :)

Thats something ive never quite got, in the UK pumps are trainers but in the US they are womens shoes, weird
 

catseye

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We pick that up that when we learn to speak, the same way as we know the order of adjectives. :cool:

Language is powerful. Control of its use is a way of marking out who is important and who is not.

Criticising others' use of language whether it's written or spoken, or formal or colloquial, or dialect or Received Pronunciation or whatever is a way of asserting superiority.

Have to say that seeing people squabbling over whether the name for little kids' indoor sports shoes is pumps or daps is rather sad.

And yup, we have had that very discussion on this message board. :chuckle:
But there needs to be a degree of uniformity to aid communication. For example, as above, if someone puts an ad on Facebook for a 'man's huddy', no pictures, they are not going to get nearly as many offers as if they say it's a 'man's hoodie'. Because people don't want to have to put in the effort to translate poor English into something comprehensible just to find out if they want to buy something or not. And then find out that a 'huddy' is some extremely local word for a coat, or something.

Standardised English is there for a reason.
 

escargot

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But there needs to be a degree of uniformity to aid communication. For example, as above, if someone puts an ad on Facebook for a 'man's huddy', no pictures, they are not going to get nearly as many offers as if they say it's a 'man's hoodie'. Because people don't want to have to put in the effort to translate poor English into something comprehensible just to find out if they want to buy something or not. And then find out that a 'huddy' is some extremely local word for a coat, or something.

Standardised English is there for a reason.
That's how people learn! :chuckle:

Advertising a 'huddy' rather than a 'hoodie' might or might not raise a sale. Someone clever enough to read it phonetically could be collecting a bargain.

There are entire websites devoted to poor text in adverts and notices. While poor English is common it doesn't go unnoticed or unmocked.
 

escargot

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Dunlop plimsolls in my day :)

Thats something ive never quite got, in the UK pumps are trainers but in the US they are womens shoes, weird
'Pumps' are what Brits call 'court shoes'.

Coming across the term 'pumps' in American books years ago I imagined them as a grown-up version of British kids' pumps, like those canvas shoes with a rubber sole that're supposed to look smart casual and rub my feet really badly. :mad:

(I do however have some gorgeous pale blue satin Nike ballet-like shoes that are really trainers. I'd call those 'pumps'! Smart and feminine but tough!)
 

ChasFink

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"Pumps" in the US are not always for women. The term refers to shoes with a low-cut opening (Wikipedia says they're called court shoes in the UK) and are considered appropriate for use with formal or semi-formal men's attire. Personally, I've never owned a pair, and felt more comfortable wearing everyday black shoes with a tuxedo.
 

escargot

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I've never owned a pair, and felt more comfortable wearing everyday black shoes with a tuxedo.
You do wear other things with them, right?
 

CharmerKamelion

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"So" gets on my nerves a little bit nowadays but I'm not going to be a dick about it .... language use evolves .. "So, I did this and that and then ...."

No mate, you are quite right. The 'so' thing is getting a bit out of hand, but as you say language evolves. But you get stuff like this on quiz shows and it does make me grind my teeth....

Quiz show host : Charlie, where are you from?
Contestant : So I'm from Norwich.
Host : And what do you do?
Contestant : So I'm a student.
Host : What are you studying?
Contestant : So I'm studying business management.
Host : And what do you do in your spare time?
Contestant : So I like to run marathons.
Host : How many have you run?
Contestant : So I've just run my 300th....

.....aaaand you get the idea with that.

In effect, I suppose it is becoming what people say nowadays instead of 'well....' and as such I suppose it is just a question of adjustment. Probably won't even notice it in a few year's time.
 

Mythopoeika

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No mate, you are quite right. The 'so' thing is getting a bit out of hand, but as you say language evolves. But you get stuff like this on quiz shows and it does make me grind my teeth....

Quiz show host : Charlie, where are you from?
Contestant : So I'm from Norwich.
Host : And what do you do?
Contestant : So I'm a student.
Host : What are you studying?
Contestant : So I'm studying business management.
Host : And what do you do in your spare time?
Contestant : So I like to run marathons.
Host : How many have you run?
Contestant : So I've just run my 300th....

.....aaaand you get the idea with that.

In effect, I suppose it is becoming what people say nowadays instead of 'well....' and as such I suppose it is just a question of adjustment. Probably won't even notice it in a few year's time.
I think the 'so' thing can be a bit condescending.
 

escargot

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Well, just around the house the dinner jacket, slacks and shoes are enough. If I go out I'll put on some underwear as well. If I have the time, I'll even bother to put it on inside of the slacks.
Tip: underwear fits on your head too.





Well, it fits on mine.
 

CharmerKamelion

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If I WERE 15... surely.
Blame Midge Ure. I do. For EVERYTHING.

And this is for Escargot.....

IMG-20210616-WA0001.jpg


...... simply because somebody had to.
 

Nosmo King

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Twice this morning i have heard a BBC news presenter use the word 'airplane' rather then aeroplane, im aware that it is an accepted US term for a winged aircraft, but to me it sounds unprofessional and childish, yet another example of American English creeping into the English language :(
 

CharmerKamelion

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I just caught the end of the Today programme on BBC Radio 4 and they finished the show with a whole list of common mispronunciations. Stuff like 'Artic' instead of 'Arctic' , 'expresso' instead of 'espresso' , 'mannerfacturing' instead of 'manufacturing' , 'nucular' instead of 'nuclear' - plus many more, all of which were things you hear all the time these days. I didn't hear them mention 'airplane' but they should have. We all know language evolves and word sounds alter over time, but things like that do niggle.
 

Peripart

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Twice this morning i have heard a BBC news presenter use the word 'airplane' rather then aeroplane, im aware that it is an accepted US term for a winged aircraft, but to me it sounds unprofessional and childish, yet another example of American English creeping into the English language :(

I don't mind it being spoken that way (after all, the 2 versions don't differ very much in pronunciation*), but I was surprised to see "airplane" written on the screen as a choice on a BBC quiz show the other day. It might've been Eggheads, but don't quote me on that.

*... and don't get me started on "pronounciation"... !
 

escargot

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Twice this morning i have heard a BBC news presenter use the word 'airplane' rather then aeroplane, im aware that it is an accepted US term for a winged aircraft, but to me it sounds unprofessional and childish, yet another example of American English creeping into the English language :(
Yup, can remember in the '60s/early 70s being rebuked by adults for using Americanisms. Examples included 'OK' and 'cute'. You couldn't say 'gum'; it had to be 'chewing gum' or 'bubblegum' and blowing bubbles with said gum was also a suspiciously American habit.

One hears British characters in period TV or radio dramas use certain words or phrases that I know were not commonly used here before about the mid-70s. They were American and therefore considered vulgar.
 

Peripart

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Yup, can remember in the '60s/early 70s being rebuked by adults for using Americanisms. Examples included 'OK' and 'cute'. You couldn't say 'gum'; it had to be 'chewing gum' or 'bubblegum' and blowing bubbles with said gum was also a suspiciously American habit.

One hears British characters in period TV or radio dramas use certain words or phrases that I know were not commonly used here before about the mid-70s. They were American and therefore considered vulgar.

Thank goodness we've moved on from that kind of pettiness!

... frantically edits next post ...
 

IamSundog

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Yup, can remember in the '60s/early 70s being rebuked by adults for using Americanisms. Examples included 'OK' and 'cute'. You couldn't say 'gum'; it had to be 'chewing gum' or 'bubblegum' and blowing bubbles with said gum was also a suspiciously American habit.

One hears British characters in period TV or radio dramas use certain words or phrases that I know were not commonly used here before about the mid-70s. They were American and therefore considered vulgar.
Y’all finally learnt to talk good.
 
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