Words & Phrases You Never Want To Hear Again

GNC

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Yup, can remember in the '60s/early 70s being rebuked by adults for using Americanisms. Examples included 'OK' and 'cute'. You couldn't say 'gum'; it had to be 'chewing gum' or 'bubblegum' and blowing bubbles with said gum was also a suspiciously American habit.

Could you say "Eeh by gum"?
 

Mythopoeika

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I just caught the end of the Today programme on BBC Radio 4 and they finished the show with a whole list of common mispronunciations. Stuff like 'Artic' instead of 'Arctic' , 'expresso' instead of 'espresso' , 'mannerfacturing' instead of 'manufacturing' , 'nucular' instead of 'nuclear' - plus many more, all of which were things you hear all the time these days. I didn't hear them mention 'airplane' but they should have. We all know language evolves and word sounds alter over time, but things like that do niggle.
Standards at the BBC slipped a long time ago.
 

Bad Bungle

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I read today that some-one "intuited" the results of a situation (because they were intuitive) - aarrrghh !!

Annoyed by mispronunciations? These ‘pacific’(specific) words will ‘probly’ (probably) leave you fuming. See also 'Expresso', (espresso) 'specially' (especially) and 'artick' (arctic), Wemberley and Engerland.



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...ly-top-list-verbal-annoyances-survey-reveals/
 

CharmerKamelion

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Yes, Bungle. I have recently heard 'Wemberley' a lot, sometimes from tv and radio presenters, people you might expect to talk proper innit.
 

JaneD

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Sorry these are IT work ones but 1) digital, meaning y’know shiny, new, modern and 2) cloud, meaning whatever you want it to mean, so you sound like you know the IT lingo. If you can get a synergy and a journey and a challenge as well you get full house bullshit bingo
 

Kryptonite

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"Can I get" gets under my skin ... in context, I'll be standing in a shop and the person in front of me is being served. The server gives a cheery "Hi! how can I help you?" to be met with a blunt "Can I get." .. how many extra calories and time would it cost these people to say "Can I please get" instead? .. it's basic politeness.
Can I nominate something that most people DON'T say in shops as something that really annoys me?

SCENARIO: There is a queue for the self-serve tills in a supermarket. Several tills are free, but the person at the front of the queue knows they are card-only and is waiting for a cash till to become available, but DOESN'T turn to the other people waiting and offer to let them use the card-only till.

This really, really irritates to me. If i see this scenario developing now, I usually politely ask if the intend to use the vacant till, and if they say "no its card only", I just barge past and use it meself.

I suppose this is what they call a first-world problem...but it still annoys me.
 

escargot

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Dunno if this has come up before - 'Every corner of the globe.'

It used to be cited as an example of crassness or ignorance but seems to be unironically acceptable now.
A reporter on R4's PM has just said it. The world is ending, I tell yers.
 

Nosmo King

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I was watching 'Kindig Customs' earlier, I was wondering why Americans pronounce 'solder', the stuff you use to attach wires etc, as 'sodder', I've heard it in a lot of American programmes.
 

Mythopoeika

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I was watching 'Kindig Customs' earlier, I was wondering why Americans pronounce 'solder', the stuff you use to attach wires etc, as 'sodder', I've heard it in a lot of American programmes.
I've observed that too. It seems to be a widespread mispronunciation that has become the norm.
 

EnolaGaia

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I was watching 'Kindig Customs' earlier, I was wondering why Americans pronounce 'solder', the stuff you use to attach wires etc, as 'sodder' ...
I've observed that too. It seems to be a widespread mispronunciation that has become the norm.

The American pronunciation represents a continuation of the earliest English pronunciation. It's the British English version that represents a more recent variant.

As with many of these differences between American English and how you say it in the UK, it's actually a side-effect of the US sticking with an older pronunciation.
"Solder" is a modern spelling of the Middle English "souder", which derives from the Old French "soudeur", which itself comes from the Latin "solidare". In the 15th century there was a movement to re-latinize the spelling of words, and the "l" got added back in to the spelling, although the pronunciation didn't change to include the "l" until sometime later. ...
https://www.reddit.com/r/electronics/comments/32lwey
If you look at the etymology, the term comes from the 14th C English word sawd which in term comes from old French soldure from Latin solidare. The British may have started pronouncing the L under the influence of the French or Latin, whereas the Americans may have kept the 14th C pronunciation; I wouldn't be surprised if that pronunciation was still around in some British dialects in the 17th C. ...
https://english.stackexchange.com/q...-the-correct-pronunciation-of-the-word-solder

Word Origin
Middle English: from Old French soudure, from the verb souder, from Latin solidare ‘fasten together’, from solidus ‘solid’.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/solder_1
 

CharmerKamelion

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I've heard newsreaders saying 'the situation is deteriating' a couple of times recently. One syllable snipped out of a long word happens quite a lot. I'm not immune. I only realised the other day when I did a double take on seeing it was 'quantitative' easing, not 'quantitive'. Oh, I did feel a fool.
 

ChasFink

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A ritual in America, on a holiday late in November, is watching a parade on TV full of pop stars and huge balloons, and sponsored by a major department store that's soon to benefit from Christmas shopping. It's properly called Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Yet too many people, including news people on the very same TV network, refer to it as the Macy Day Parade. When looking to save time talking about the event, I think even the profit-minded Macy's would consider their name the least important word in that title.

By the way, I really hate it when people call the balloons "floats". Floats are those enormous vehicles with the pop stars on them.
 

CharmerKamelion

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I've just heard the term 'pre-loved' used on a tv advert for the Vinted selling app. That's a usage that has always bugged me. Is there something wrong with 'second hand' ? Isn't it just trying to put a more positive spin on the fact that something isn't brand spanking new? Just silly.

Okay. Whinge over. Felt good though!
 

EnolaGaia

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I've just heard the term 'pre-loved' used on a tv advert for the Vinted selling app. That's a usage that has always bugged me. Is there something wrong with 'second hand' ? Isn't it just trying to put a more positive spin on the fact that something isn't brand spanking new? Just silly. ...
It's been some years since (e.g.) eBay began exclusively referring to used / second-hand items as "pre-owned." My recollection is that this happened first.

The first times I saw "pre-loved" always seemed to be related to a child's toy or stuffed figure. The phrase then proliferated from there.
 

Swifty

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"You're sooo in dinyal !" .. I've only had that one thrown at me twice (by the same person) and both times I've replied "No I'm not? .. you're right .. I know I don't care? .. I give less of a **** than Slim Shady." That one's irritating. Armchair psychologists.
 

GNC

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"You're sooo in dinyal !" .. I've only had that one thrown at me twice (by the same person) and both times I've replied "No I'm not? .. you're right .. I know I don't care? .. I give less of a **** than Slim Shady." That one's irritating. Armchair psychologists.

Surely de Nile is in Egypt?
 

IamSundog

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At the end of a story or discourse upon some subject:

“So….yeah!”

I interpret this to mean something like:

“So now, by way of conclusion, let me just say that, well, I guess I don’t actually have the intellectual wherewithal to articulate a conclusion.”
 

GNC

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At the end of a story or discourse upon some subject:

“So….yeah!”

I interpret this to mean something like:

“So now, by way of conclusion, let me just say that, well, I guess I don’t actually have the intellectual wherewithal to articulate a conclusion.”

That's what you get for holding a conversation with Roland Rat.
 

PeteByrdie

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At the end of a story or discourse upon some subject:

“So….yeah!”

I interpret this to mean something like:

“So now, by way of conclusion, let me just say that, well, I guess I don’t actually have the intellectual wherewithal to articulate a conclusion.”
A youtuber I follow does end her videos on tropes in fiction with quick conclusions, but adds, 'So.... yeah!' at the end. Until then, I hadn't noticed it, but it's infectious, and I've done it a couple of times.

I'm tired of portmanteaus. I know they've long been a part of our language, but it seems to become an obsession. It's just another thing I can't keep up with, along with internet acronyms. I realised how unsettling I find them today, after hearing the words 'staycation' and 'e-tailer' in two different TV commercials, and also having myself invented 'joggling', when my friend messaged me to say someone had just jogged past her house while juggling three balls.
 

escargot

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A youtuber I follow does end her videos on tropes in fiction with quick conclusions, but adds, 'So.... yeah!' at the end. Until then, I hadn't noticed it, but it's infectious, and I've done it a couple of times.

I'm tired of portmanteaus. I know they've long been a part of our language, but it seems to become an obsession. It's just another thing I can't keep up with, along with internet acronyms. I realised how unsettling I find them today, after hearing the words 'staycation' and 'e-tailer' in two different TV commercials, and also having myself invented 'joggling', when my friend messaged me to say someone had just jogged past her house while juggling three balls.
How many balls? :chuckle:
 

Ringo

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At the end of a story or discourse upon some subject:

“So….yeah!”

I interpret this to mean something like:

“So now, by way of conclusion, let me just say that, well, I guess I don’t actually have the intellectual wherewithal to articulate a conclusion.”
I blame Eddie Izzard.
 

GNC

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"Where are you going for your staycation?" is not a question that makes sense. If you're staying where you are, then you're not going anywhere. If you were going somewhere, it would be a vacation - or holiday, as it's otherwise known. That's my current pet peeve.

"Where are you going for your staycation?"
"Oh, the Riviera."
 
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