World Records (General; Miscellaneous)

Yithian

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Origami train bid hits buffers

A museum's attempt to set a unique origami record has been scuppered by the Guinness Book of World Records.
Paper-folding enthusiasts gathered at the National Railway Museum in York to create a train of 1,550 wagons, headed by a paper model of Stephenson's Rocket.

Origami enthusiasts also sent in paper wagons from all over the world for the record attempt, including Colombia, the US, Germany and Japan.

But officials from Guinness World Records rejected the 254 metre construction, dismissing the bid as "too specialised".

They said in a statement: "We simply cannot have a record for everything that can possibly be made from origami - animals, trains or otherwise."

The only recognised record for paper folding is the world's largest origami crane, set in 1999.

Museum spokesman Keira Meheux said: "Naturally we are very disappointed with the news, particularly since so many people worked so hard to create the train.

"However, all is not lost because the event was incredibly popular with our visitors, who thoroughly enjoyed making their own wagons to add to the train."

A spokesman for the British Origami Society said he was philosophical about the failed bid because it was still a "spectacular event". http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/north_yorkshire/3183316.stm
=================================
Mean gits.
:mad:
 

ramonmercado

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Published online: 20 December 2005;
| doi:10.1038/news051219-1

Man breaks world records with Antarctic swim
How can a person wearing only Speedo trunks survive the icy sea?
Michael Hopkin

British swimmer Lewis Pugh this week broke two world records, for the most southerly swim ever undertaken in the ocean, and the longest-duration polar swim ever completed. In completing the two feats, he battled temperatures that would kill you or me in minutes. So what does he have that we mortals don't?

On 14 December, Pugh swam a kilometre in the seas off the Antarctic Peninsula at a latitude of 65º South, some of the world's coldest waters, where the sea's saltiness allows temperatures to dip to just below 0 ºC without freezing. The feat, which took 18 minutes and 10 seconds, required him not only to maintain a safe body temperature throughout the ordeal, but also to stave off the crippling effects of the body's natural reaction to icy water.

Two days later, he swam a mile off the nearby Deception Island, spending 30 minutes and 30 seconds in the water - longer than any other polar swimmer. Physiologist Tim Noakes of the University of Cape Town, South Africa, who accompanied Pugh on the trip, said: "I did not believe it possible to swim for 30 and a half minutes in 2-3 ºC water in just Speedo trunks."

"Normal people would probably be dead within a minute because of the cold-shock reflex," says James Butcher of British medical journal The Lancet1, which profiled Pugh ahead of his record attempt. Less than a second after hitting the water, the lungs constrict, causing an untrained person to hyperventilate, taking up to 60 gasping breaths per minute. Heart rate and blood pressure also skyrocket as the heart panics in response to the shock. Pugh says he felt "screaming pain" all over his body as soon as he dived in.

"It's an exaggerated fight-or-flight response," explains exercise physiologist Michael Tipton of the University of Portsmouth, UK. The paralysing effect of this response means that, in icy water, the body becomes its own worst enemy; not that this is typically a problem. "In our normal day-to-day experience, we don't tend to fall into cold water," Tipton points out.

Cold shower

Fortunately for Pugh, overcoming the response is fairly easy. "Anybody can develop a habituation to the cold," says Tipton. "You can do it with as little as five or six 5-minute immersions."

Tipton and his colleagues have found that, with enough exposure to cold water, volunteers can even be trained not to shiver, allowing muscles to work more effectively. In the weeks leading up to his swim, Pugh took frequent cold showers as well as training in icy water.

Of course, preventing the body from shutting down is just half the battle - Pugh and his support team also had to ensure that his body temperature remained above 35 ºC, which is generally regarded as the cut-off point for hypothermia. "The thing that keeps him going is the ability to produce large amounts of heat," Tipton says.

The thing that keeps him going is the ability to produce large amounts of heat.

Michael Tipton
University of Portsmouth



Pugh is aided in this by what Noakes calls 'anticipatory thermogenesis'. Just the sight of icy water is enough to send his body temperature ratcheting up to 38 ºC, giving him a head-start against the ravages to come.

"Mental imagery can have a profound effect on physical responses," says Tipton. The same thing happens on a smaller scale when the average person anticipates giving a speech, for example, as their body releases stress hormones and ups its metabolic rate.

Fit or fat

Once in the water, the best way to maintain body heat is to produce a lot of it through frantic swimming, and to stay well insulated. The best long-distance swimmers tend to have a combination of these "fitness and fatness" factors, Tipton says.

Women tend to be relatively better than men at outdoor swimming, because their tendency to have more fat over their leg and arm muscles keeps them better insulated. This is important during active swimming, when blood is pumped into the arms and legs and so can accelerate heat loss. The previous record-holder for polar swimming is US female Lynne Cox, who has attributed her success in part to her 36% body fat (most women have a percentage in the 20s).

But thinner men and women can gain back an advantage by being fit. "If you see a thin outdoor swimmer, the chances are they're really fast," says Tipton. Pugh falls into this category. Besides his record as the only person to have swum at both ends of the Earth, he is also the fastest man to swim around South Africa's Robben Island, completing the circuit in just three hours and 42 minutes in 2004.

References
Butcher J., et al. Lancet, 366. S23 - S24 (2005).


Story from [email protected]:
http://news.nature.com//news/2005/051219/051219-1.html
 

zarathustraspake

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I bet he didn't look his best when he took the speedos off though. :twisted:
 

Mighty_Emperor

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That Titon chappie seems to suggest it is a matter of training but other reports say it is down to his rather unique physiology:

23 December 2005 14:24


The 5-Minute Interview: Lewis Gordon Pugh

Long-distance swimmer and world record breaker
Published: 23 December 2005

Lewis Gordon Pugh, 36, is the first person to have completed a long-distance swim in both the Arctic and Antarctic. During his swims, which both broke world records for the longest polar swim, he faced temperatures of between 2 and 3C - in his Speedo trunks.

Right now I am feeling...

Very, very happy. It took a lot of hard work, planning and preparation.

I would say the difficulty level...

On a scale of one to ten was 100! The swim at Deception Island was by far the hardest swim I've ever done. Antarctica is a very unforgiving environment. If you don't train properly you'll die.

I first found out I was able to take the cold...

About two years ago. I saw the sports scientist Professor Noakes. He confirmed my core body temperature is a lot higher then other people. Normal temperature is 37C, but mine is 38.4C. It doesn't sound like a difference, but it is enormous.

http://news.independent.co.uk/people/pr ... 334815.ece

Arctic Swim Sets New Record, Swimmer Astounds Scientists

December 21, 2005 8:00 a.m. EST

Christina Ficara - All Headline News Staff Reporter

Cape Town, South Africa (AHN) - Extreme swimmer Lewis Pugh sets a new world record for the most southerly long-distance swim, after swimming the icy Antarctic waters at 65 degrees south. The record was set with a 0.6-mile swim, making Pugh the first person to accomplish such a feat in the world's coldest seas.

Pugh explains, "As soon as I dived in, I had a screaming pain all over my body."

With only a swimsuit, cap and goggles, Pugh took less than 19 minutes to complete the swim near Vernadsky, the Ukrainian scientific base on Antarctica, in 32-degree water and heavy snow.

Pugh admits, "I am not sure how I kept on going for so long. I had to concentrate all the time and swim as fast as I could to keep the cold out."

Pugh, who trained for months in an icy plastic pool in Cape Town's harbor, has astounded scientists with his ability to raise his body temperature before swimming, allowing him to survive temperatures that only a few can endure.

Leading South African sports scientist Tim Noakes explains, "When he enters the water, his core body temperature is extremely high and he is able to maintain this temperature for up to 15 minutes in ice cold water. To my knowledge, this capacity has not been previously described."

www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7001577856
 

IvanVolle

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Record-breaking Mentos and coke explosions
24/04/2008
"It was to be one of the biggest science experiments ever seen yet there was not a bunson burner or test tube in sight.

Around 1,500 students kitted out in waterproof ponchos discovered exactly what happens when you drop a mint sweet into a bottle of Coca Cola, in an attempt to break a world record.

The students, from Belgium, tried to out-fizz the previous record for so-called Mentos fountains by simultaneously putting Mentos mints into bottles of the soft drink.

The resultant chemical reaction shot hundreds of streams of carbonated soda into the air.

The explosive record-breaking event was held in Ladeuzeplein square in Leuven, Belgium. "

Article:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jh ... oke123.xml

Video:
http://www.myvideo.be/watch/4019861
 

ramonmercado

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Australian sword swallower sets Guinness world record

Chayne Hultgren began practising the art of sword swallowing at the age of 16

An Australian performance artist has set a Guinness world record by swallowing 18 swords at the same time.

Chayne Hultgren, also known as the Space Cowboy, beat his own 2008 record by swallowing the swords, each 72cm (28.35in) long, at an event in Sydney.

He said that while the stunt was not dangerous, he had spent many hours training for it.

After setting the record, Mr Hultgren, 31, described it as definitely one of his greatest achievements so far.

"Wow, I did it, it feels good, thank you very much, it feels really good actually," he said.

Mr Hultgren started practising with swords at the age of 16 and says he has used different methods to perfect the art.

"I stretch my throat with hoses and use a few different techniques to basically enable me to do what, until now, has been impossible".

"I don't just straightaway grab 18 blades and shove them down my throat - you've got to practise a lot and build up to it," he says.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8503748.stm
 

rynner2

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I'm reviving this old thread, because TGBoR is still an ongoing thing, and because it might cut down the number of separate threads on The World's oldest, youngest, shortest, tallest, etc, etc...

..plus a mixed bag of new records has just shown up:

Guinness World Record for bearded woman Harnaam Kaur

A model with six-inch long facial hair has become the youngest woman in the world to have a full beard, according to the Guinness World Records.
Body positivity campaigner Harnaam Kaur, 24, from Slough, Berkshire, said it was "humbling" to be included.
She described her beard as part of her quest to overcome years of bullying to cope with her appearance.

Other record breakers added to the list include the longest pet cat and a high-jumping llama.

Ms Kaur has polycystic ovary syndrome, a hormonal condition that can result in the growth of excess facial hair.
In March 2016 she became the first female with a beard to walk the runway at London Fashion Week.

The record for longest domestic cat currently alive goes to a 3ft 10.59in (1.183m) moggy from Wakefield, West Yorkshire.
Ludo, a Maine Coon, was no bigger than other kittens in his litter when he was taken home by his owner Kelsey Gill in 2014.
Ms Gill now has to use a dog carrier for the supersized cat and a dog harness to accommodate his length.

Also making the list is Caspa, a nine-year-old high-jumping llama who can leap a bar 3ft 8.5in (1.13m) high.
The animal, which lives on a farm in Porthmadog, North Wales, has been described by his owner as a "total diva" and the envy of all the other llamas on the farm.

The record for the fastest speed achieved on a monowheel motorcycle has been set by a team at Elvington Airfield, North Yorkshire.
Kevin Scott, from Lincoln, achieved 98.464 km/h (61.18 mph) on a bike built by UK Monowheel Team.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37305050

Photos and videos on page, and links to longer articles.
 

ramonmercado

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DUBAI: A Sikh temple in Dubai on Thursday broke the world record for serving breakfast to the maximum number of people from diverse nationalities.

The temple was awarded a Guinness World Record after serving 600 people from 101 countries an hour-long continental breakfast.

The temple broke the previous record of 55 nationalities sharing a continental breakfast, organized by Nutella at the Milan Expo in Italy in 2015.

The Khaleej Times reported that schoolchildren, government officials and diplomats attended the event while Indian Ambassador to the UAE Navdeep Singh Suri was the chief guest. ...

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1084436/offbeat
 

ramonmercado

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Is he nuts or just milking it for all its worth?

A Cook Islander has become the first ever world champion in the sport of coconut tree climbing, it's been reported.

George Iona emerged the winner in a field of 16 entrants, winning by the smallest of margins, Tahiti's Radio 1 reports. He scaled the eight-metre (26.25 feet) tree in 5.62 seconds at the event in the garden of the Tahiti Museum. His time was just one hundredth of a second ahead of American Samoa's Fiapa'i Ellio, the pre-race favourite.

The objective of the new sport is simple, Tahiti TMTV says: Climb the tree as quickly as possible, with each climber being given two attempts to post their best time. The winning tactic appears to entail wearing a loop of rough rope around the ankles, allowing better purchase on the trunk. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-40629686
 

Anonymous-50446

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Is he nuts or just milking it for all its worth?
There'll be a kernel of truth in that story.

Here's a coconut for ya;
CNV00079.JPG

Guess the country and the year...
 

Heckler

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Guess the country and the year...
Given the lush tropical setting, beautiful blue skies and verdant coconut trees, I'm going for Western-Super-Mare, yesterday?
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I'm doing a marathon DJ set for charity in a few weeks, hopefully it will all be video-streamed to the internet so you might be able to experience it for yerself!

Anyway...I've got a mate who works at Guinness World Records, so I thought I'd check it out. Longest DJ Set! It would be pretty cool to be a world holder. I was planning on doing 12 hours straight, all vinyl, how long could the current record be?

Ten days.

Ten days.

Granted, it was digital not vinyl, he was allowed a five minute break every hour, an hour break every 24 (or 12, can't remember), but the music had to be continuous, at least one person had to be dancing at all times, and he wasn't allowed to repeat a tune for at least four hours. And he wasn't allowed to sleep (he started hallucinating after day 5).

Still...

Ten days.
 

GNC

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I assume by the time he reached the tenth day he had been reduced to playing The Dooleys and Liquid Gold records.
 

hunck

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Shortest ever boxing match?

Heavyweight boxer Curtis Harper lost his bout against Efe Ajagba on Friday in Minnesota in unusual fashion - leaving the ring after the opening bell without a punch being thrown.

Fighting on the Premier Boxing Champions (PBC) card at the Minneapolis Armory, Harper ducked through the ropes as soon as the bell rang and walked all the way back to his dressing room. He did not return and was eventually disqualified.

Nigeria’s Ajagba improved his record to 7-0 with his one-second win.
 

ramonmercado

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Bet you didn't see this coming.

Two men have begun an attempt to set a world record for the longest time spent continuously on a see-saw.

Richard March and Michael Jones started on Saturday in Twyford, Berkshire, where an unofficial record of 80 hours on the bounce was set in 1969 by Mr Jones' father-in-law.The pair are eating, sleeping and answering calls of nature on the giant homemade machine. They aim to finish on Tuesday night after bouncing about 60,000 times.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-berkshire-47921051
 

GNC

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Woman swims English Channel a record four times in a row:
Video of the record holder

Amazing achievement, she's a breast cancer survivor too. Although after watching that I feel even more fat and rubbish.
 

ramonmercado

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A cyclist who rode a penny farthing bike from Land's End to John O'Groats in four days and 12 hours has been told he has broken a 133-year-old record.

Richard Thoday, of Matlock, Derbyshire, completed the 874-mile challenge in July but had to wait for confirmation from Guinness World Records. The previous record was set in 1886 by celebrated cyclist GP Mills, who did the journey in five days and one hour. Mr Thoday said the wait was "nerve-racking" but he felt "very relieved".

"I gave Guinness World Records all the evidence I could provide so if they said 'no' there was nothing else I could do," he said.

"I certainly wouldn't be doing it again anyway. It was just so hard."

The 55-year-old's record attempt helped to raise £10,000 for Children in Need.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-50451465
 

Mythopoeika

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Bet that was tough. No gearing, even though the big wheel might help.
 

hunck

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He'd probably have to walk it up a lot of hills. As for going downhill, I think you have to hang off the side & use a foot on the small back wheel as a brake. Good luck with that. Bloody dangerous contraptions. Got to doff your cap for the effort. Solid tyres as well so a pretty bumpy ride I reckon.

Having looked at the picture I'm suspecting it's a modified or more modern version - it looks like it has a brake on the rear wheel. A hell of an effort nevertheless. Averaging 200 miles a day on that is no mean feat.
 

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A driver has died during a British land speed record attempt.

The fatal accident occurred at Elvington Airfield, a former RAF base near York, governing body Motorsport UK said.

North Yorkshire Police said it was called to reports of a "serious collision" at the scene shortly after 16:30 BST.
No further details. This is the same place Richard Hammond had his crash in 2003.
 

EnolaGaia

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Michael Andretti won the race for which the finish is shown here. Unlike his previous victories the loser's car gets eaten. To be fair, the winner's car gets eaten as well.
CakeCar-Finish.jpg

This event established Guinness records for speed and distance traveled for an edible vehicle.
Debut a piece of cake as edible cars greet new ilani parking garage

ilani has officially opened its new six-story parking garage, and the casino opted to celebrate the occasion by racing edible cars — as in, cars made primarily out of cake.

The two replica Formula One cars each consisted of a cake body mounted on an aluminum chassis, resulting in a 669-pound vehicle that was, according to a press release from ilani, 91 percent edible.

That 91 percent number was key, according to ilani, because the goal of the race was to set two new Guinness World Records: fastest edible vehicle and longest distance covered by an edible vehicle. To qualify, the cars needed to be at least 90 percent edible. ...

FULL STORY: https://www.columbian.com/news/2021...s-edible-cars-greet-new-ilani-parking-garage/

Associated Guinness Record Webpages:
https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/99877-fastest-edible-vehicle
https://www.guinnessworldrecords.co...longest-distance-covered-by-an-edible-vehicle
 

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GNC

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I was watching a documentary last night about the Signal Hill skateboard contest of the mid-to-late 1970s. I don't know how Fortean it was, but we do have a Great Acts of Stupidity thread. It reminded me of the cheese rolling tradition in England that many tried to get banned because it was so dangerous.

Signal Hill is one of the steepest in California, and someone had the bright idea of using it to set the record for the fastest speed achieved on a skateboard. The result was a lot of broken bones (spectators as well as contestants) and entries in the Guinness Book of Records. The footage in the doc is insane, these customised boards going over 50 miles an hour with just a mattress to stop them, or some hay bales. Streaks of skin left on the asphalt. It's a miracle nobody was killed, though one woman lost a lung.

Anyway, it was eventually banned, and now with a lot more safety in place downhill skateboarding is a real sport. But not there.
 

ramonmercado

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Some jump.

A former paratrooper who leapt from a helicopter into the sea without a parachute has had his jump confirmed as a world record.

John Bream, 34, nicknamed "the Flying Fish", dropped from a helicopter off the Hampshire coast in October 2020. Guinness confirmed the 131 ft (40 m) jump was the highest from an aircraft into water. Mr Bream carried out the stunt to raise awareness of suicide among military veterans. The former member of the Parachute Regiment, from Havant, fell briefly unconscious after hitting the water at about 80mph (130km/h). He was taken to hospital as a precaution after being hauled from the sea by support divers, but later said he just had a "bit of a sore backside".

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-hampshire-56913249
 

Trevp666

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Never before has the phrase "Too much time on their hands" been more fitting.

Watch golfer Marcus Armitage set a new world record of 303 yards for the farthest golf shot hit into a moving car at Elvington Airfield in England.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/av/golf/56927388
 

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World's longest pedestrian suspension bridge to open in Portugal

Crosses a gorge, 1700 ft long.

Nestling among the rocky mountains of Portugal's Arouca Geopark, a new bridge has become the world's longest pedestrian suspension bridge.

It's taken two years to build and cost 2.3 m euros ($2.8 million). It is due to open fully to visitors from 3 May, but some local residents have already had a chance to try it out.

One of the first people to visit the bridge said he was "a little afraid" but that the experience was "extraordinary."

Short video.
 

Trevp666

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I couldn't find a thread specifically for the World Land Speed Record, so this has, er, 'landed', here;

Bloodhound racer displayed at Coventry Transport Museum
"The arrow-shaped racer reached a top speed of 628mph (1,010km/h) on the lakebed of Hakskeen Pan, South Africa, in late 2019.
In January Mr Warhurst said he had gone as far as he could with the project and could not put any more money into it to fund the fitting of the new part (an innovative environmentally friendly rocket motor)"

(Okay, so I know it's not about 'origami', but it does appear to be a project that, for now, has 'folded')

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57143170

(EDIT: Dunno how, despite many searches of titles using different words - 'record', 'world', 'speed', etc - no search gave me this thread! My reference to 'origami' was because the #1 post upthread 'Origami train bid hits buffers' was the only thread that appeared. Which in itself seems strange)
 
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