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#91
China's military parade celebrating its World War Two victory may have been a tightly choreographed show with nothing out of place - but it was a totally different story on Chinese social media.

Netizens on microblog site Weibo had a field day poking fun at the parade, posting satirical pictures and jibes at po-faced leaders. Their efforts were quickly scrubbed off by censors determined to keep the national conversation on script.

Some of the posts were captured by Hong Kong-based coder Cedric Sam and Weiboscope, a Hong Kong University project that monitors deleted Weibo content.

Winnie and Xi
One popular topic was President Xi Jinping, who at the start of the parade inspected the troops from a car.

Weibo user Diuz posted a picture of a Winnie the Pooh toy. It came without a caption, but thousands got the joke - it was one of the most popular deleted posts, shared more than 65,000 times before it was taken down, according to Weiboscope.

Image copyrightDiuz
Mr Xi has been closely associated with Winnie the Pooh since 2013, when netizens noticed that a picture of him walking next to US President Barack Obama looked a lot like Winnie the Pooh and Tigger - those posts were swiftly deleted at the time, of course.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-34137519
 
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#92
Lengthy flight delays in China can bring out the worst in people, with violent reactions to news of cancellations a regular occurrence. But a crowd of Chinese tourists stuck inBangkok for 10 hours chose a novel way to vent their anger: singing their national anthem.

Their flight had been scheduled to take off from Don Mueang International Airport at 5pm on Friday but was delayed until 3am the next day, according to the Shanghai-based news portal Thepaper.cn.

The tourists demanded thousands of yuan in compensation and an apology, then changed tack.

A mobile phone video of the emotional tourists singing the anthem went viral in China, although it has to be said it is not a particularly expert rendition.

“They were scheduled to take a flight by Orient Thai Airlines, but the fight was delayed and the tourists were quite discontented,” an airport worker told Thepaper. “Thirty three of the passengers refused to leave the departure hall after the others boarded.” ...

Their behaviour was not the first incident of passengers reacting angrily to travel dispruption this year. At Kunming Changshui International Airport in southwestern China in January, angry passengers opened emergency doors after their flight was stuck on the tarmac for hours.

In June, there were remarkable scenes at Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport where delays and cancellations because of a typhoon sent passengers on a rampage, throwing food and wheelchairs, and damaging computers.

The following month, seven cabin crew on a Hong Kong Airlines flight were attacked by six passengers and taken to hospital after the flight was delayed by eight and a half hours. ...

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/worl...-in-protest-at-bangkok-flight-delay-1.2344505
 

Elsupremo

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#93
I lived in Stockholm for a few months with a Swedish girl friend and I can believe that story. Swedish women love to fight with men. What is funny about the Swedes is the men are quite calm and intellectual while the women love to fight, after all they are the Vikings and I did love to here the fat lady sing. She was great.
 
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#95
Elsupremo was responding to this post by Vard, link seems to have died.

Chinese media tempted by fantasy of women-only Swedish town

A mythical Swedish town where men are barred from entering and women turn to homosexuality has piqued the interest of several Chinese media outlets.

* Outrage over drunken Swedish pastor's funeral service (2 Oct 09)
* Woman refuses 'Sweden's smallest benefit payment' (1 Oct 09)
* Hand gel faulted for fouling up Swedish bus service (1 Oct 09)

The town, supposedly founded in 1820 in the northern Swedish woods by a wealthy widow, boasts 25,000 residents and a medieval castle, according to the Chinese news agency Xinhua.

A pair of blonde female sentries stand guard at the unnamed town, referred to in reports as “Chako Paul City”, and men wishing to enter risk being “beaten half to death” by police. ..
 

Peripart

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#99
Sorry, making reference to reputed town in Sweden where only lesbians live as reported in Chinese media
My apologies - I was trying to mentally connect China and Sweden, and not getting very far. Thanks to you and Ramon for supplying the missing link, as it were!
 

Xanatic*

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It seems the media has made up another story about Sweden, that it is switching to a 6 hour work day.
 

Peripart

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Yes, I'm sure that Swedes may be many things, but you won't find me calling them lazy!

These stories that get reported do make me wonder whether, for the Chinese media, Sweden is akin to Timbuktu - somewhere that most people aren't even sure exists, but where the most fantastic things are said to happen.
 

Heckler

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To be fair growing up in the UK in the 70's it wasn't far off that. I knew they had blond people and saunas and ABBA and had loads of nookie whenever a fridge repair guy turned up (I never did find out if he ever fixed that fridge) but I had no concept of what the country was, merely it was foreign and exotic.
 
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A Chinese tourist has died in Hong Kong a day after being beaten up during a so-called "forced shopping" tour.

Operators of such discounted tours try to recoup costs by pressuring tourists to buy goods at selected stores.

Police said the victim, 54, intervened when a fellow tourist got into a fight with a tour guide after refusing to buy anything at a jewellery shop.

At least four people have been arrested and the Hong Kong Tourist Board (HKTB) expressed regret over the incident.

"The HKTB has zero tolerance for any act that impacts the hospitable image of Hong Kong, particularly acts of violence," it said in a statement.

The victim, a male building contractor from north-east China, was found lying unconscious outside the shop in Kowloon on Monday morning.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34584235?ocid=socialflow_twitter
 

Yithian

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Inside the Unregulated Chinese Hospitals That Make Men Impotent
R.W. MCMORROW
May 16 2016, 9:00am


On the afternoon of September 30, 2015, 23-year-old Little Huang stood on the roof of the 11-story Shenzhen Health and Family Planning Commission building, ready to jump to his death. In the lot below, Chinese officials' cars looked about the size of matchboxes, and the clamor of a nearby construction site filtered up as a dull hum. As Little Huang peered through the light haze toward the hills of Hong Kong, he dialed a 25-year-old man named Junjun. "We're on the roof," he said. "Bring alcohol and water bottles."*

Junjun exited the metro at Cui Zhu station, stopped for rice alcohol and water bottles, then rode the elevator of the white-tiled building to the tenth floor. There a staircase wound up to the crumbling concrete roof, where he found that Little Huang had now scaled even higher, to the top of a mechanical shed that seemed to sway in the breeze over the building's edge. Two other young men who Junjun recognized, Mr. Wang and Mr. Peng, stood with Little Huang. Junjun was nervous, but Little Huang cajoled him to climb up, too. The men wore matching white ball caps. Characters on the front explained the reason the men might jump: "Black-Hearted Men's Hospitals Destroyed Our Well-Being."

All four men, like more than a thousand across China who communicate with one another in online patient chat groups, say they were duped into surgeries that doctors worldwide have determined pose great risk and have little scientific merit: a dorsal neurectomy that severs penile nerves, ostensibly to cure premature ejaculation issues, though Chinese physicians sell the surgery with whatever explanation will likely get the person on the operating table. As a result of the surgeries, Junjun, Little Huang, Mr. Wang, and Mr. Peng's penises have gone completely numb, they can't get full erections, and some experience searing pain, probably from neuromas, which result from nerve trauma. No known corrective surgery or therapy exists. (In this story, these victims are referred to by nicknames or surnames.) All four men, who are in their 20s, may never have offspring. The men, in turn, refer to themselves as "China's 21st century eunuchs."

Physicians at private clinics have bargained with patients during surgery, female patients have been tricked into aborting healthy fetuses, and there have been many documented deaths as a result of physician negligence.

Sham penile surgeries are just one part of a much larger system of poorly regulated and corrupt private healthcare in China. In other instances of medical malfeasance, physicians at private clinics have bargained with patients during surgery, female patients have been tricked into aborting healthy fetuses, and there have been many documented deaths as a result of physician negligence. Pseudoscientific medical devices are in wide use, as is the practice of proffering false diagnoses, as more than 60 private hospitals have done to Chinese undercover journalists in the past six years. Meanwhile, the number of private hospitals in China is blossoming—between 2005 and 2015, 9,326 new facilities opened their doors. Today they make up about half of all hospitals in China. That proportion will likely grow as ongoing Chinese healthcare reforms aim to increase private investment in the sector and government-run insurance schemes expand to cover private healthcare facilities. American companies including Morgan Stanley Private Equity Asia, a division of Morgan Stanley, are pouring in millions of dollars as well.

CONTINUED IN HORRIFIC DETAIL AT CONSIDERABLE LENGTH:
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/chinas-21st-century-eunuchs-v23-n3
 

Yithian

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Immigrant communities within communities are generally interesting and this tale grabbed me because it seems structurally as if it belongs in the Golden Age of Detective Fiction.

This extract is not the start of the (well-written) article, but an introduction to the scam that the writer utilises to introduce the topic--you may well be able to guess where it's going:

One afternoon in late April of last year, she [Wang Jin] was leaving the Bensonhurst branch of Marshalls when an agitated woman in her early forties rushed up to her. “I’m looking for a doctor called Xu,” the woman said, in rapid-fire Cantonese. “It’s urgent—for my daughter.”

Wang had been to plenty of traditional Chinese-medicine practitioners in the neighborhood, but she’d never heard of a Dr. Xu. “He is very well known here,” the woman went on. “I think he’s my daughter’s only hope.” She said that the girl had begun her first menstrual bleeding two weeks earlier and nothing would staunch the flow. Friends spoke of Dr. Xu as a miracle worker, but no one knew where to find him.

A woman passing by overheard and interjected, “Are you talking about the Dr. Xu? He’s a treasure. I have him to thank for my mother-in-law’s incredible recovery.” When the first woman asked for more details, the newcomer shrugged. “He’s become a real recluse in recent years,” she said. “I don’t even know if he sees patients anymore.”

Wang was curious. She’d had her own share of ailments. A decade ago, she had surgery to remove a tumor in one of her ovaries, and, a dozen or so years before that, her husband had suffered a back injury that left him unable to work. She became responsible for supporting their two young children. “I would tell the kids, ‘Mama is not hungry today—you guys hurry up and eat,’ ” she told me. At the time, she made around a hundred and thirty dollars a week, at a garment factory on Grand Street, and the physical demands of the work had ravaged her body.

As Wang and her new acquaintances talked, it turned out that the woman who’d met Dr. Xu was from a village not far from where Wang had grown up. She introduced herself as Liu, asked about Wang’s husband and children, and extended an open invitation to have tea at a bakery she owned with her husband. Wang was touched by her solicitude. It reminded her of life back in Taishan, where you’d constantly cross paths with acquaintances and there was a web of trust, woven over generations, from the reciprocal exchange of favors. If you had an unfamiliar problem, you’d seek out a shu ren, a “familiar person,” to help. In the U.S., however, Chinese people shared less about themselves. “Everything is business,” Wang said.
Full Article:
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/30/chinatowns-ghost-scam
 

Yithian

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'White Monkey Jobs'

China’s Rent-a-Foreigner Industry Is Alive and Kicking

Is there something more trustworthy or authoritative about a person who is white? In the early 90s, when my parents ran an after-school program in a highly competitive suburb of Southern California, they often debated hiring exclusively white teachers as a way to appeal to their predominately Asian-American customer base. I remember feeling baffled and indignant that they believed Asian faces didn't broadcast prestige the way a white face did.

Although casting white faces has become less prevalent among the Asian diaspora community, in remote parts of China, "face jobs" or "monkey jobs" are still common. Businesses can rent laowais—foreigners—to show up at parties, to masquerade as CEOs and doctors, even to act as emissaries of Obama.

Filmmaker David Borenstein, who made the New York Times Op-Doc "Rent-a-Foreigner in China," first went to the country as an anthropologist to research the massive housing developments that were being built in provincial western China. While he was there, he was often approached by agents in the rent-a-foreigner industry to participate in real-estate openings organized to lure potential buyers.

Borenstein's new film, Dream Empire, from which the NYT Op-Doc is excerpted, examines not only the rent-a-foreigner industry but also the political and cultural climate in China that allows these "international" spectacles to seem like valid demonstrations of prosperity and progress. While it is easy to focus on the surface-level absurdity of the phenomenon, the economic realities underneath the spectacle remain enormously complicated.


Continued here:
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/4wb84b/chinas-rent-a-foreigner-industry-is-still-a-real-thing
 

Frideswide

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Fabulous! Both the ghost culture one and the Tiger Balm ones!

Reminds me of the bible fundamentalist parks that have the dioramas of humans and dinosaurs together.
 

Yithian

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While many elderly Chinese women spend their free time practicing public square-dancing, a grandmother in China's Sichuan province is busy pole-dancing.

Dai Dali, a 70-year-old granny, started to learn pole dancing four years ago. She is now able to pull off many intense moves, such as hanging upside down with one leg on the pole and doing splits along the pole. She has even won the Fifth China Pole Dance Championship.


Continued:
https://gbtimes.com/70-year-old-chinese-granny-i-prefer-pole-dancing

 

James_H

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While many elderly Chinese women spend their free time practicing public square-dancing, a grandmother in China's Sichuan province is busy pole-dancing.

Dai Dali, a 70-year-old granny, started to learn pole dancing four years ago. She is now able to pull off many intense moves, such as hanging upside down with one leg on the pole and doing splits along the pole. She has even won the Fifth China Pole Dance Championship.

Continued:
https://gbtimes.com/70-year-old-chinese-granny-i-prefer-pole-dancing

One thing I noticed on a recent trip to China is that while strip clubs are illegal, pole-dancing studios (as a fitness thing) abound. Also old people are very into keeping fit there.
 
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