Help With Odd Insect Identification

eburacum

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The plume moth is a remarkable example of convergent evolution, since the 'plumes' on its wings closely resemble feathers. This is different to parallel evolution, because the moth order and the bird class are not closely related by any measure, so they should not be expected to share many common features.

Of course, when examined in detail, the moth plumes are very unlike bird feathers- they lack stiff keratin spines and interlocking barbs, but superficially they resemble bird wings. Lovely.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Another great example of convergent evolution is the remarkable Hummingbird Hawkmoth.
I saw a beautiful one of these in my sister-in-law's garden in France last year and, for a moment, thought it was a hummingbird a very long way from home:

hawkmoth.jpg
 

Sid

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I've only ever seen one Devil's Coach Horse in my life, and that was back in the early 70s. It was dead

When I lived in South London (North Kent area) ~ yonks' ago, I used to come across these coachmen fairly frequently during Summer day's. Bit scary coming across them back then, especially when they would arc their abdomens and display their pinchers - was only a kid then so it was fascinating to watch them all-be-it at a cautious distance!

In fact... that's just brought back a memory of a most unusual large bug I happened cross paths with.

It was a very large, and a very unexpected Beetle - I was in the Klondike area of the north of Scotland undertaking a bit of licenced gold prospecting, as I'd come across some information about this place being an old Klondike camp - evidence of which is still there today!

Anyway, I was exploring walking about in thick heather one nice sunny evening, when I was stopped in my tracks as I'd spotted this huge beetle directly in front of me scuttling away pretty quickly disappearing underground. Found out later it is known as 'The Tiger Beetle!' (Big; metallic green/blue Beetle, with white spots and huge pincers!

Making my the way back down to my tent, I had to pass (a bit too close for my liking) quite a number of snakes (adders, and grass) sunning/cooling themselves in the gully's along the side of the peat track down the hill. I made sure the zipper was fully zipped down that night, and on subsequent nights!
 
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Bad Bungle

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Another great example of convergent evolution is the remarkable Hummingbird Hawkmoth.
I saw a beautiful one of these in my sister-in-law's garden in France last year and, for a moment, thought it was a hummingbird a very long way from home:

View attachment 27683
I was thinking about the Hummingbird moth yesterday - the first and only time I saw one was nearly twenty years ago in my Sister's garden in Suffolk. It flitted from flower to flower just like a hummingbird, (that had got lost in Suffolk).
 

Sid

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I was thinking about the Hummingbird moth yesterday - the first and only time I saw one was nearly twenty years ago in my Sister's garden in Suffolk. It flitted from flower to flower just like a hummingbird, (that had got lost in Suffolk).
Have Hummingbird Hawk Moth's visit the garden most years (none so far this year), there are large and smaller versions of this miraculous mimic of one of natures most fascinating flyers.
 

escargot

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I was thinking about the Hummingbird moth yesterday - the first and only time I saw one was nearly twenty years ago in my Sister's garden in Suffolk. It flitted from flower to flower just like a hummingbird, (that had got lost in Suffolk).

My youngest and I saw one flying round the town centre flowerbeds years ago. What a beautiful and intriguing sight. We watched it for ages until it flew off, then popped to the library to find out what it was.
 

Sid

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My youngest and I saw one flying round the town centre flowerbeds years ago. What a beautiful and intriguing sight. We watched it for ages until it flew off, then popped to the library to find out what it was.
Another look-alike insect 'escargot,' is one that seems to be on the increase in the UK with the Hummingbird Hawk Moth in mind, and that is a fly which carries the name of a 'Bee Fly.'

When spotted - and that can be so easily mistaken for a Bee, it's just like a black bee until you see that it has a long proboscis just like the Hummingbird Hawk Moth! Don't know what science makes of it all, but it seems like the Hummingbird Hawk Moth mimicked the Humming-Bird, and the Bee-Fly mimicked the Hawk Moth? Suppose it's all wrapped up in genetics - some how along the line, they seem to have got their wires crossed about what they're supposed to 'BEE' :crazy: !
 

Bad Bungle

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I looked up the Devil's coach horse beetle (Ocypus) mentioned earlier and think I've solved a 50 year old mystery (ooh - a Fortean coincidence). What I saw on the path outside my house in 1969 was like a rove beetle, but really long and had about 10 legs (unforgettable). Do these beetles molt their skins ? If so then what I saw could have been the beetle dragging its old carapace behind it.

Ocypus-ophthalmicus-n.jpg
 

EnolaGaia

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... What I saw on the path outside my house in 1969 was like a rove beetle, but really long and had about 10 legs (unforgettable). Do these beetles molt their skins ? If so then what I saw could have been the beetle dragging its old carapace behind it.

The larvae molt, but I don't think its common to see them above ground.

It might be more likely that what you saw was a rove beetle engaged with dinner (prey; another insect). The rove beetles typically snag prey and chew on them until the solid bits are liquified enough to swallow.
 

Stillill

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One of my colleagues at work saw this on a driveway today. I’m not sure if it’s flora or fauna. Those blocks are 7 3/4 inches long so it’s a fair size. Any ideas?
8A5967FA-CCD0-4322-B17F-14BAE7ACC161.jpeg
 

Mythopoeika

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Brown centipede?
 

AnonyJ

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Stillill

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MercuryCrest

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One of my colleagues at work saw this on a driveway today. I’m not sure if it’s flora or fauna. Those blocks are 7 3/4 inches long so it’s a fair size. Any ideas?

You'll know better than I, but it looks from the picture like some similarly colored maggots/grubs are eating something else. Almost looks like the carapace of a juvenile dragonfly.

Anyways, when I come upon such mysteries, I usually go to whatsthatbug.com. They're an amazing resource.
 

Sharon Hill

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One of my colleagues at work saw this on a driveway today. I’m not sure if it’s flora or fauna. Those blocks are 7 3/4 inches long so it’s a fair size. Any ideas?
Someone should have poked it with a stick. It looks more like one of those "sticky" toy centipedes made of silicone.
HTB14HebiC_I8KJjy0Foq6yFnVXaA.jpg
 

EnolaGaia

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Someone should have poked it with a stick. It looks more like one of those "sticky" toy centipedes made of silicone. ...

There are also similar plastic (etc.) figures sold as fishing lures - some of which are as "anatomically correct" as the sticky toys.
 

Stillill

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Someone should have poked it with a stick. It looks more like one of those "sticky" toy centipedes made of silicone.
View attachment 27865
I’ll ask him to give it a poke this morning if it’s still there and if he’s on the same delivery. I’m not totally convinced it’s an animal.
 

Eponastill

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That is saying 'plant with roots' to me, I have to say. (Or maybe fake centipede.) But a real creature would have joints in its legs, which would be more obvious, I think. Cool though.

edit - Maybe BadBungle's animal was actually "getting friendly" with another rove beetle? (But beetles definitely don't moult once they're an adult. and although the larvae would have legs, the pupa between larva and adult wouldn't have legs)
 
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Min Bannister

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Yes I think it is just a twig as the "legs" just look wrong. It has no doubt been brushing against the ground and has begun to take root.
 

gordonrutter

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That is saying 'plant with roots' to me, I have to say. (Or maybe fake centipede.) But a real creature would have joints in its legs, which would be more obvious, I think. Cool though.

edit - Maybe BadBungle's animal was actually "getting friendly" with another rove beetle? (But beetles definitely don't moult once they're an adult. and although the larvae would have legs, the pupa between larva and adult wouldn't have legs)
Yeah that’s why I was asking about the sea, looks more sea weady than anything.
 

Eponastill

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Yes I see your point, there are seaweeds that grow in sections like that. Though they do tend to be the smaller ones for some reason? It has got a tentacley look!
 

AlchoPwn

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If centaurs were real, they would be insects. A bit like praying mantises perhaps?
 

Sid

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One of my colleagues at work saw this on a driveway today. I’m not sure if it’s flora or fauna. Those blocks are 7 3/4 inches long so it’s a fair size. Any ideas?View attachment 27862

Managed to find what I believe is the specie in your photograph 'Stillill.'

Scolopenda galapagoensis Centipede: Female is darker. Life span 7 years. Max length 20cm (7.874 inches).

The species originates from South America. Many think the "dark morph" of S. galapagoensis = S. gigantea "black morph" and has a wider range around the coast of Colombia, Venezuela, Trinidad, Margarita Island and the ABC islands.

**Note: That within the white circle I've included in my clip, there seems to be either an extra large red Ant, or some other similar creepy-crawly busy dissecting it for lunch it seems!
Unkown insect.jpeg


*This is a photograph of the a live one.
Centipede.jpg


PROBABLY IT'S EITHER ESCAPED FROM SOMEONE'S HEATED TANK, OR BEEN DISCARDED?
 
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Stillill

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Yes I think it is just a twig as the "legs" just look wrong. It has no doubt been brushing against the ground and has begun to take root.
Yes, I originally said that I wasn’t sure if it was flora or fauna. I’ve asked the postman concerned to get some more photos if it’s still there.
 

Sid

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Yes, I originally said that I wasn’t sure if it was flora or fauna. I’ve asked the postman concerned to get some more photos if it’s still there.
I imagine it is/was a female, as the one I shown above must be a younger female of the specie. Also note that in your photograph the antenna have been lopped off somehow.
 

Sid

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Quick update. The thing on the driveway is no longer there. I now waiting for a reply from the Natural History Museum.
Wonder if they are sold in exotic Pet stores - (maybe a local one might be able to shed some light on it 'Stillill?')
 
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