Hottest Chili in the World

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Anonymous

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#31
Timble said:
Not sure about the conditioner, but I've been told that if you put out food for birds, a bit of Tabasco sauce will keep off the squirrels and mice without putting off the birds as they can't taste it.
Yes. Here in the states the squirrels have an undesirable habit of climbing up into folk's bird feeders and hogging all the seed.

Solution? Capsicum coated bird seed, packaged and sold. Works like a charm.
 
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Anonymous

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#32
Conners_76 said:
Does anyone have any tips about growing these beauties? I'm taking part in a chilli-growing competition with a few chums, and I'd be keen to get the upper hand with some insider advice.
Hot sun, all day long direct sunlight....the hotter and more constant the better, and pepper plants don't like wet feet. However, they will wilt if it is too hot and dry without regular watering. If the ground does not have good drainage, add a lot of peat moss, sand or acquarium grit to bump up the drainage a lot. Or plant in half-barrels.

You may have trouble growing really hot peppers in the UK; if you look at the climates really really hot peppers are native to (the Caribbean, Mexico, Southern California, Central America) they are tropical or semi-tropical. I know, I know.... but "scotch bonnet" is just a name, the pepper comes from the Carribean. One way to boost the amount of sun is to get mylar, the silver kind, staple it to a balsa frame, slap that against the wall, and plant the peppers or place the pots in front of that. They get the reflected sun and a hotter temp and will grow big lovely HOT peppers.

I do know that pepper seeds that produced wonderfully fiery chilies in southern California (ex hubby's uncle's garden) generated only moderately hot peppers in our ever so slightly cooler northern California gardens (mine and my father's).
 
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Anonymous

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#33
Fallen Angel said:
Hot sun, all day long direct sunlight....the hotter and more constant the better, and pepper plants*.............*I do know that pepper seeds that produced wonderfully fiery chilies in southern California (ex hubby's uncle's garden) generated only moderately hot peppers in our ever so slightly cooler northern California gardens (mine and my father's).
thanks Fallen, this is great stuff.

I sowed them on Saturday, and have them in a Propagator underneath a skylight and near some French windows. It will dip below 20 degrees quite often though, at least until May, but I presume that this is OK at night?
 
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Anonymous

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#34
schnor said:
Yep, the indian Tezpur chili is indeed the hottest, and it's about 75% hotter than the red Habanero :)
Well, if that's the case, it's one mean pepper, but 75% hotter than Habanero still won't make it the 855,000 scovilles that drjbrennan suggests. Scoville lists Habaneros as 80,000 - 300,000, so by my reckoning, that'd make these Tezpur babies 525,000 scovilles tops.
Still b**tard hot, though. Incidently, the scoville scale lists 'Pure Capsaicin' as 16,000,000! How would one get one's hands on that? Surely a vital ingredient for any chilli worth it's salt, or fuel for interstellar travel....
 

_schnor

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#35
I said "about 75%", now with the help of a calculator is turns out to be more like 65.1461988% as hot when compared to the Red Savina Habanero.

I must brush up on my mental arithmetic :(
 
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Anonymous

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#36
schnor said:
I said "about 75%", now with the help of a calculator is turns out to be more like 65.1461988% as hot when compared to the Red Savina Habanero.

I must brush up on my mental arithmetic :(
Pah! 65.14%? A mere tonsil tickler...
 

Atch_

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#38
101 said:
Well, if that's the case, it's one mean pepper, but 75% hotter than Habanero still won't make it the 855,000 scovilles that drjbrennan suggests. Scoville lists Habaneros as 80,000 - 300,000, so by my reckoning, that'd make these Tezpur babies 525,000 scovilles tops.
Still b**tard hot, though. Incidently, the scoville scale lists 'Pure Capsaicin' as 16,000,000! How would one get one's hands on that? Surely a vital ingredient for any chilli worth it's salt, or fuel for interstellar travel....
15 Habanero peppers

1 quart 200 proof Ethanol

Method:

In a blender, puree the Habanero's in as much Ethanol as possible. Let the mixture sit overnight at room temperature. Pour the resultant sludge through paper towels and place the liquid in a glass container. Begin to heat the liquid very slowly using either an electric heating device (naked flames would be dangerous), or use a vapour trap to remove the alcohol fumes safely. Continue until 90% of the liquid has evaporated. Remove from the heat and let cool. Look for a brick-red oil floating on the surface of the ethanol. If none is present, continue to evaporate the ethanol away periodically cooling the mixture to look for the red oil on the surface. Once the red oil appears, pour the red oil and the remaining ethanol into a long thin glass cylinder, use an eye dropper to suck off the oil and place it in a clean container. The red oil is fairly pure Capsaicin, probably 40% Capsaicin / 60% Capsaicinoids.
 

Philo_T

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#39
101 said:
'Pure Capsaicin' as 16,000,000! How would one get one's hands on that? Surely a vital ingredient for any chilli worth it's salt, or fuel for interstellar travel....
From the place that makes pepper spray for security? (Mental image of Homer spraying pepper spray on an omlete).
 
A

Anonymous

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#42
We have a local restaurant here in Virginia that serves its famous Two Flush Chili

:eek!!!!: :eek!!!!:
 
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Anonymous

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#43
Conners_76 said:
I sowed them on Saturday, and have them in a Propagator underneath a skylight and near some French windows. It will dip below 20 degrees quite often though, at least until May, but I presume that this is OK at night?

Well they're only flaming dead now ain't they. 37 lovely little plants I had, and in one afternoon they all wilted and died. What's that all about?.......

Have any readers successfully grown chillies in the UK? It seems to be a bloody sight harder than I thought.....
 
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Anonymous

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#45
Conners_76 said:
Well they're only flaming dead now ain't they. 37 lovely little plants I had, and in one afternoon they all wilted and died. What's that all about?.......

Have any readers successfully grown chillies in the UK? It seems to be a bloody sight harder than I thought.....


wilted and died?.... root rot...too wet/stagnant water round thier poor toes.... what about some sort of capilary matting to water them?....
 
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Anonymous

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#46
sidecar_jon said:
wilted and died?.... root rot...too wet/stagnant water round thier poor toes.... what about some sort of capilary matting to water them?....
root rot you say sj? Hmmm......interesting. I did er on the side of overwatering them at first. Then I panicked about the soil being saturated, so repotted them and kept them too dry if anything.

I thought they were tough enough to handle a bit of rough treatment either way, but it seems not.

What's worse is that my mate has big, 24 inch titans to boast of, and he only grew his from seeds in a Sainsbury's green chilli, rather than the exotic internet seeds I ordered.

How does capilary matting work? Is that related to hydroponics ?

And Gimauche, I may just have to have your Mum's greenhouse away!.......
 

Yithian

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#47
Re: Bill's Post Chili Tasting

drjbrennan said:
There have been few things in life, let alone the Internet that have made me laugh as much as that post. Others may have seen it before but I was rolling around with bubbles of snot coming out of my nose and laughing so loud I woke up the baby!
God bless you!
*Bump*

Bloody funny - anyone's who's not looked should check out Bill's post on page one. :D
 
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Anonymous

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#48
Ack! I only just saw this, and Connors plants died! Rats. I mentioned that peppers don't like wet feet! Did you try again this summer, Connors?

I've got some lovely ones, I make a spicey roasted red pepper dip with roasted red bell peppers and one lonely roasted hananero....a little balsamic, a little oil....puree until almost smooth. Yum. Excellent with crostini or focaccia.

It's a nice hot summer here so I'll likely get ripping hot peppers come August and September. Wheee! Yith, I'll make some chili in your honor. Ii'll call it The Yithian's Knock Your Socks Off Chili. With beans or without?
 
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Anonymous

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#50
Okay, I'll PM you the recipe if it turns out as good as I think it will. I'm going to try something a little different this time.

Creative juices and saliva both flowing.....
 
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Anonymous

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#51
Conners said:
Have any readers successfully grown chillies in the UK? It seems to be a bloody sight harder than I thought.....
This is probably going to depress you, but I've done it a few times, using seeds scraped from the insides of chillies bought from Asda. Just grew them in pots on my living room window-sill. Once they start cropping you'll never be short for chillies again.

By the way, how do people prefer to spell the things?

Chilli, or the New Mexican Chile? :)
 

PeniG

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#52
Chili.

Chile is a South American country. Chilli is a British spelling, doubtless invented because y'all couldn't stand to see a word with no extraneous letters at all. ;)

I have an excellent vegetarian chili recipe if anyone's interested, but it's mild. I can't eat hot things. It's my Midwestern childhood come to haunt me. I like potato-stuffed chilis rellenos, though.

If you're ever in the western part of Texas - it starts round about where I live but doesn't become universal till you're well into semi-arid country - keep your eyes open for a jar of whole pickled jalapenos by the cash register at restaurants and convenience stores. These are bought by old men in Stetsons and Guaybera shirts, who eat them (seeds and all) alongside their meals.
 
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Anonymous

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#53
chile= a pepper, or the plant on which it grew

Chile = South American country

chili = a stew-like soup flavored with chilis

chilli = a common mis-spelling of chili

chilly = the most common temperature in Scotland

sorry I could not resist
 

Bokononist

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#55
i have a curry recipe that needs Congo chilis. I've never heard of them, anybody know what they look or taste like?
Incidentallly, iin Spain they have Pimientos de Padron, which look a like little green chilis but 90% of them are not hot at all, they taste like green peppers. The other 10% vary but when you get a hot one it can be really hot. I spent 30 minutes running around the room flapping my arms after finding one. It's a little like Russian roulette, only with chilis. They're usually fried and served whole with loads of beer.
 

hedgewizard1

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#56
Friend of mine grows habaneros as perenials here in Florida. Has to protect them in the winter, but some are 3 years old. He makes a nice habanero jelly. Sweet, fiery stuff. Good with pork.
 

escargot

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#57
You geniuses. The BF adores hot spicy foods and I like growing stuff from seeds so I'll raid the fridge for the hot chilis I got him last week and grow him some. :)

I never used to eat 'hot' foods but he's corrupted, erm, converted me. :eek:

This sounds fun-
Incidentallly, iin Spain they have Pimientos de Padron, which look a like little green chilis but 90% of them are not hot at all, they taste like green peppers. The other 10% vary but when you get a hot one it can be really hot. I spent 30 minutes running around the room flapping my arms after finding one. It's a little like Russian roulette, only with chilis. They're usually fried and served whole with loads of beer.
I did a bit of that at the market today when I was buying deli stuff for tea. I gracefully accepted a taste of each thing- olives, feta, garlic, chili......... chili! CHILI! :eek!!!!:
 

Min Bannister

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#58
Man ends up in A and E after eating world's hottest chilli.

Not quite what you think though. Apparently he was having horrible headaches.

A man who ate the world's hottest chilli pepper in a chilli-eating contest ended up in A&E after experiencing "thunderclap" headaches.

The 34-year-old man had eaten one Carolina Reaper chilli in the contest in New York State.

The "crushingly painful" headaches came on in the next few days.

His experience has been published in the BMJ Case Reports as it is the first case to be associated with eating chilli peppers.

The doctor who reviewed his case has warned anyone eating hot chilli peppers to seek medical attention immediately if they experience sudden onset headaches.
Not sure I would be eating something called the "Carolina Reaper" The clue is in the name.

the Pucker Butt Pepper Company
:rollingw:
 

Fluttermoth

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#59
I'm quite a fan of Carolina Reaper, even though I don't normally like hot food; it has a really, really nice flavour. I find a piece about the size of my thumbnail (dried, no seeds) is enough for a six person chili.

I did once get a bit in my eye when I was chopping it (dried, not fresh) and it was truly awful. Felt like being stabbed in the eye socket with a red hot poker, and the whole side of my face swelled up. I did wonder if I was going to actually go blind in that eye for a while :willy:
 

dr wu

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#60
^Wow....that sound like some seriously hot chili peppers.

My brother used to frequent this Thai restaurant near Fort Meyers Florida many years ago and the first time he visited the menu said...: mild , hot, Thai hot..so he asked for the Thai hot but they said they took that off the menu because people complained it was too spicy. So he went with the hot and after about 15 minutes he was profusely sweating as it was very spicy so they brought him a hand towel to wipe his head and face. He said to me....can you imagine what the Thai hot must have been like? LOL.....
 
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