Sonic Weapons

OneWingedBird

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#2
Gruenler concedes that permanent hearing damage is possible if someone were exposed to the sound for lengthy periods.

But he said the high-pitched tone is intended to only be used for a few seconds at a time.

'Rubber bullets' weren't designed to be used at close range, 'daisy' cutters weren't designed to be used on soft targets and electric cattle prods weren't designed to be shoved up people's butts by third world regimes - so do I trust Gruenler :hmph:

They also fail to mention that high frequency sound is not only highly directional but will reflect off of any hard surface, try using this in a built up area and I'm inclined to think you've got a hell of a racket on your hands with all the reflections and cross reflections creating reberations and echos for a fair distance around.
 

wembley8

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#3
Interesting - still amazingly low-tech compared to some of the stuff that they're working on. Acoustic weapons really don't seem to be doing very well.
 

GNC

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#4
From Breaking News. I couldn't find a thread devoted to sonic weapons, but if there is one then merge away...

Reports from Russia’s Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics located in Irkutsk are reporting today that their Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) detected a ‘massive’ ultra low frequency (ULF) ‘blast’ emanating from Latitude: 45° 00' North Longitude: 93° 15' West at the ‘exact’ moment, and location, of a catastrophic collapse of a nearly 2,000 foot long bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

To the horrific destruction of the Interstate 35W Bridge which spanned the Mississippi River we can read as reported by the Star Tribune News Service:

"The 1,907-foot bridge fell into the Mississippi River and onto roadways below. The span was packed with rush hour traffic, and dozens of vehicles fell with the bridge leaving scores of dazed commuters scrambling for their lives.

Nine people were confirmed dead as of 4 a.m. today. Sixty were taken to hospitals and 20 people were still missing this morning. Authorities said they expected the death toll to rise."

Russian Military reports state that the total collapse of such a massive bridge, and in the absence of evidence linking its destruction to terrorist activity, could only have been accomplished by an acoustic weapon, of which the United States Military is known to possess.

These reports further state that one of the United States primary research organizations into acoustic weapons research is Augsburg College, and which is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and most importantly less than 1 mile from the Interstate 35W Bridge collapse.

To the exact reason of why, and what exactly happened in this catastrophe we can only speculate, but, with what is known about the United States past history of using sophisticated weapons on their own citizens for ‘research’ purposes it certainly lies in the realm of possibility that this horrific tragedy is rooted in the use of ULF weapons.
More here:
http://www.whatdoesitmean.com/index1026.htm

If they were testing their sonic weaponry, then I would have thought they'd deploy it on a structure that wasn't in use? Every tragedy has its conspiracy now...

And exactly what is this acoustic weapon the USA is known to possess? Anyone ever heard of it? Are they getting mixed up with the Biggles film from the eighties?
 

Gadzooks3

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#5
I vaguely remember (sorry I can't be more specific!) reading about some sonic weapon that the French had invented back in the 1970s that was patented in France but has never been used since its original test. Basically, someone had wondered what would happen if a six-foot working prototype of a pea whistle (like a football ref's whistle with the dried pea in it) was to be built and blown. Apparently, when actually "blown", ie blasted with compressed air, the giant whistle caused all the internal organs of the hapless assistant who arranged to blow it (and was near it at the time) to turn to a "toothpaste-like consistency" (I remember that particularly gruesome descriptive detail!). The device was redesigned and tested in a field, and the same effects - though lessened - happened to the operator there too. As the weapon could not be made to be operated safely on the battlefield, the patent was upheld but the project shelved.

I can't remember where I read this, but I have read it in more than one source, though it's likely that a sonic weapon was designed but didn't work, and the gruesome detail is an urban legendary embellishment. Who knows?

It's an interesting story though, isn't it?... ;)
 

GNC

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#6
It's a great story! Although you'd think that after the device turned one person to toothpaste inside that they'd find a way of setting it off by remote control from a safe distance?
 

wembley8

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#7
Gadzooks3 said:
I vaguely remember (sorry I can't be more specific!) reading about some sonic weapon that the French had invented back in the 1970s that was patented in France but has never been used since its original test...
Gavreau's device - described in detail here -

http://www.borderlands.com/archives/arch/gavreaus.htm

- unfortunately with perhaps a little too much imagination. Like Tesla, the myth is greater than the man and nobody has replicated any of this stuff.

A more realistic (if much drier) assessment of the known effects of sound, infrasound and ultrasound for weapon applications is provided by Dr Altmann's piece - http://www.princeton.edu/~globsec/publi ... ltmann.pdf


Any acoustic weapon is going to be relatively short range for obvious reasons, and you certainly can't destroy a bridge with one!

AFAIK all current US acoustic weapon research is into nonlethal weapons for crowd control, although there's an underwater one which may be dual nonlethal/lethal if the taget doesn't get the hint.
 

EnolaGaia

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#8
recall some interesting stuff about this in the ft a year or two ago.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/ptech/03/03/sonic.weapon.ap/index.html
The CNN article is MIA (not avaiable @ CNN.com). Here's a condensed version dredged from the Wayback Machine:

Troops get high-tech noisemaker
U.S. soldiers in Iraq have new gear for dispersing hostile crowds and warding off potential enemy combatants. It blasts earsplitting noise in a directed beam.

The equipment, called a Long Range Acoustic Device, or LRAD, is a so-called "non-lethal weapon" developed after the 2000 attack on the USS Cole off Yemen as a way to keep operators of small boats from approaching U.S. warships.

The devices have been used on some U.S. ships since last summer as part of a suite of protection devices.

Now, the Army and Marines have added this auditory barrage dispenser to their arms ensembles. Troops in Fallujah, a center of insurgency west of Baghdad, and other areas of central Iraq in particular often deal with crowds in which lethal foes intermingle with non-hostile civilians. ...

Though not officially part of the military's Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate, the 45-pound, dish-shaped device belongs to a developing arsenal of technologies intended not to kill but to deter. ...

Carl Gruenler, vice president of military and government operations for American Technology Corp., said LRADs are "in the beginnings of being used in Baghdad," though he said he lacked "initial feedback" on how they are working.

Dubbed "The Sound of Force Protection" in a company brochure, the devices can broadcast sound files containing warning messages. Or they can be used with electronic translating devices for what amounts to "narrowcasting."

If crowds or potential foes don't respond to the verbal messages, the sonic weapon, which measures 33 inches in diameter, can direct a high-pitched, piercing tone with a tight beam. Neither the LRAD's operators or others in the immediate area are affected. ...

Gruenler compares the LRAD's shrill tone to that of smoke detectors, only much louder. It can be as loud as about 150 decibels; smoke detectors are in the 80 to 90 decibel range.

"Inside 100 yards, you definitely don't want to be there," said Gruenler, adding that the device is recommended for a range of 300 yards or less.

Hearing experts say sound that loud and of that high a frequency -- about 2,100 to 3,100 hertz -- could be dangerous if someone were exposed to it long enough.

"That's a sensitive region for developing hearing loss," said Richard Salvi, director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness at the University at Buffalo. "The longer the duration, the more serious it is."

Gruenler concedes that permanent hearing damage is possible if someone were exposed to the sound for lengthy periods.

But he said the high-pitched tone is intended to only be used for a few seconds at a time.
SOURCE (Wayback Machine): http://web.archive.org/web/20040402...4/TECH/ptech/03/03/sonic.weapon.ap/index.html
 

RaM

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#9
Many years ago we had at a remote location Rover, so call as it looked like K9's
head from Doctor Who, the ears being tow high intensity spot lamps and nose
very technical looking speaker, once armed any noise would set this beast off
and it was physically painful to be within many yards of it if it went off you had
to fit earplugs or defenders the steel your self to dive into the room and switch it
off, one day some bod turned up and took it away apparently some scroat had
got his self trapped with one and died, most likely why I suffer from tinnitus now.
 

Mythopoeika

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#10
Many years ago we had at a remote location Rover, so call as it looked like K9's
head from Doctor Who, the ears being tow high intensity spot lamps and nose
very technical looking speaker, once armed any noise would set this beast off
and it was physically painful to be within many yards of it if it went off you had
to fit earplugs or defenders the steel your self to dive into the room and switch it
off, one day some bod turned up and took it away apparently some scroat had
got his self trapped with one and died, most likely why I suffer from tinnitus now.
A remote location rover? A security system? Not quite clear.
 

RaM

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#11
Many years ago the Americans did some test on supersonic propeller driven aircraft,
they removed the jet engine from I think a Thunderchief fighter bomber and stuck
a big turbo prop on the front fitted with a propeller designed to go supersonic,
the tests were cut short as with the engine running on the ground the noise
sent anyone anywhere near the thing into convulsions.
It was nick named the Thunder Screech.
 

EnolaGaia

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#12
... It was nick named the Thunder Screech.
That would be the Republic XF-84H, based on the F-84 'Thunderstreak'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_XF-84H

I've seen the last surviving specimen, and it's an odd beast. It had a miserable reputation among the few test pilots who ever flew it, and its sonic effects on people within a few hundred yards were widely reported.
 

maximus otter

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#13
The US Military Is Making Lasers That Create Voices out of Thin Air:

Within three years, the Pentagon's non-lethal weapons lab hopes to have a direct energy weapon that can produce an effect like a haunted walkie-talkie or the biblical burning bush.


Watch the video above and listen carefully for what sounds like a human voice during the second spin. That’s not an audio recording or a broadcast transmitted over radio…it’s not human at all. It’s an auditory effect that’s created by military scientists who manipulated the air with lasers — and it’s the Pentagon’s most interesting idea for stopping people charging checkpoints, or just scaring the crap out of them.

The U.S. military’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program, or JNLWD, is inching closer to a weapon that alters atoms to literally create words from thin air. It’s called the Laser-Induced Plasma Effect and, fingers crossed, they hope to be able to say intelligible words within the next three years.

The weapon is composed of two parts: first, a femtosecond laser, which shoots a burst of focused light for 10−15 seconds, just long enough to rip the electrons from air molecules and create a ball of plasma. (Sometimes called the fourth state of matter, plasma is a field of electrified gas, highly responsive to electromagnetic effects.) The scientists then hit that plasma field with a second nanolaser, tuned to an extremely narrow range of wavelengths. They use that to manipulate the plasma field in a way that can produce light and noise. Get the interaction precise enough and you get something that sounds like a haunted walkie-talkie.

“We’re this close to getting it to speak to us. I need three or four more kilohertz,” says David Law, who runs JNLWD’s technology division.

maximus otter
 

AlchoPwn

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#14
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#17
I would suspect that a lot of matters Fortean can be explained by Infrasound, the science of which is only now being investigated. Here is a document regarding some of its effects:
https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/chem_background/exsumpdf/infrasound_508.pdf
It's also the case the rooms in buildings are about the right size to act as Helmholtz cavities at infra-sound frequencies (with 10Hz waves having a wavelength of about 34M) and that can be especially horrible I'd have thought.
 

Kchoo

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#18
So, it may not be a weapon, but, there are all these frequency videos on You Tube so yeah.... supposedly frequencies can trick, or activate the mind with binurial waves...


I mean, if stuff like this really appeals to the brain, then could stuff like this also destroy the brain?
 

EnolaGaia

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#19
The sonic weapon(s) most relevant to your everyday life may be right in front of you ... The means for hacking computers so as to induce or transmit intense and / or inaudible high- and low-frequency sounds through your connected / controlled speakers has now been demonstrated.
HACKERS CAN TURN EVERYDAY SPEAKERS INTO ACOUSTIC CYBERWEAPONS

SPEAKERS ARE EVERYWHERE, whether it's expensive, standalone sound systems, laptops, smart home devices, or cheap portables. And while you rely on them for music or conversation, researchers have long known that commercial speakers are also physically able to emit frequencies outside of audible range for humans. At the Defcon security conference in Las Vegas on Sunday, one researcher is warning that this capability has the potential to be weaponized.

It’s creepy enough that companies have experimented with tracking user browsing by playing inaudible, ultrasonic beacons through their computer and phone speakers when they visit certain websites. But Matt Wixey, cybersecurity research lead at the technology consulting firm PWC UK, says that it’s surprisingly easy to write custom malware that can induce all sorts of embedded speakers to emit inaudible frequencies at high intensity, or blast out audible sounds at high volume. Those aural barrages can potentially harm human hearing, cause tinnitus, or even possibly have psychological effects. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.wired.com/story/acoustic-cyberweapons-defcon/
 

hunck

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#20
There's an interesting article here about ultrasonics & whether some people are affected by them.

It has a video of a tone generator running continuously from 20hz to 20khz if you want to see what you can hear. I've got high end loss & don't hear anything after 12khz.
 

Jim

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#23
The sonic weapon(s) most relevant to your everyday life may be right in front of you ... The means for hacking computers so as to induce or transmit intense and / or inaudible high- and low-frequency sounds through your connected / controlled speakers has now been demonstrated.

FULL STORY: https://www.wired.com/story/acoustic-cyberweapons-defcon/
Seen something similar occur believe it or not. Experiments using a microwave traveling wave tube transmitter which transmitted 10's of Kw. The transmitter translated audio communications up to microwave frequencies which came across the base juke box and nearby stereo systems. The individual who did this got into considerable issue with the authorities for transmitting dangerously high levels of power in a non-restricted area.
 
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