1959 U.S. State Dept. Rules Re: Yeti Encounters

maximus otter

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"In 1959, a U.S. government memo issued by the embassy outlined the guidelines for “expeditions searching for the YETI in Nepal.”

The memo, called “Regulations Governing Mountain Climbing Expeditions in Nepal — Relating to Yeti,” highlighted what hunters could or could not do if they faced the fabled monster.

According to the document, the permit fee to hold a Yeti-hunting expedition costs $77 and the hunters were allowed to catch or take photos of the creature.

“All photographs taken of the animal, the creature itself if captured alive or dead, must be surrendered to the Government of Nepal at the earliest time,” stated the memo.

The only time the Yeti could be shot and killed was in self-defense.

The guidelines also state that any report on the Yeti being real had to be turned over to the Nepalese government. The news of its existence “must not in any way be given out to the Press or Reporters for publicity.” "

http://time.com/4090520/us-government-hunt-yeti/

maximus otter
 

amyasleigh

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#3
I believe I've heard before, about this memo. An actual US embassy in Kathmandu was first opened in 1959; previously, diplomatic dealings USA / Nepal had been via US representatives in India. I recall it being suggested that the staff of the new embassy on Nepalese soil, were treading delicately re the possible sensibilities of their hosts (potentially dicey situations envisaged, by reason of the close proximity of China) -- it would seem probable that the ambassador and those under him did not go far in the direction of thinking the Yeti's existence likely; but were taking care to "humour the locals". (Potential Yeti-hunters probably wouldn't be short of cash, anyway.)
 

stu neville

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Could this relate to Jimmy Stewart smuggling the Pangboche Finger out of India and into the UK (Peter Byrne having nicked it from Nepal)? It caused a bit of a stir a couple of years before this.
 

EnolaGaia

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#5
Could this relate to Jimmy Stewart smuggling the Pangboche Finger out of India and into the UK (Peter Byrne having nicked it from Nepal)? It caused a bit of a stir a couple of years before this.
It more probably resulted from the rising number of Western visitors who were coming to seek the yeti. Even though there had been earlier expeditions, it was Tom Slick's 1957 expedition that really inaugurated the era of publicized yeti hunts.

My guess is that this development loomed larger in the minds of the locals than outsiders might have expected, and they made a point to advise the State Department folks of the ground rules.

The exact timeline for the Pangboche finger theft - or surreptitious loan, depending on which account you read - is similarly murky owing to differential telling. However, all accounts I've seen indicate the finger had left the country no earlier than 1958 and no later than sometime in 1959.
 

stu neville

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I know Byrne had "acquired" it at Slick's behest - I always believed that the '57 expedition was when it happened, as Slick got injured (IIRC) and had to drop out, so left Byrne to take over. It's definitely late 50s though as you say.
 
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