1974 Cannock Chase UFO Crash Report

corsair2000e

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#1
In his book "Cosmic Crashes" Nick Redfern presents a report of a possible UFO crash on Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, England in 1974.

Redfern's source, Roger, worked on an Outside Broadcast unit for ATV television in Birmingham. On a snowy winter's night in 1974, the team's boss, John Rose, instructed the team to go to Cannock Chase as there had been a UFO sighting. The team travelled to the Hednesford area of Cannock Chase where they came upon a police cordon. Saying they were from ATV news, their minibus was let through. Police and army personnel were everywhere, up to 100 soldiers and 10 lorries were present. The object had come down in a field but the OB unit were not allowed to go near it and they could not see properly into the field. Two men were sitting in an old Austin A60 car, apparently stuck in the snow. One car door was open and aman, shaking and sweating was visible. The team interviewed the two men. While travelling through the Chase they had seen a "fireball" come down in the field. One of the men, the one who was clearly now distressed, had gone into the field and seen "a flying saucer." Later, an ambulance took away the man under much duress. Before they left, the OB unit's cameraman sneaked through a hedgerow and filmed a very large circular burn mark in the field, surrounded by snow. While in the preview room back at ATV, viewing the footage, government officials arrived and confistated the film. Roger was told by Rose that he had done some checking up on the man who had been taken away in the ambulance and, by posing as a relative, had discovered that the man had died of radiatian burns in a local hospital. The cameraman had secretly made a copy of the film before it was taken away but Roger was unable to obtain it for Redfern.

Well, what are we to make of that? If true, it is quite remarkable. One intriguing aspect is how John Rose knew that there had been a sighting and how he knew exactly where to send the OB team. Furthermore, the witness to the "flying saucer" and his companion had not seen anything taken from the field, yet the cameraman filmed a circular burn mark, not a physical object. Also, if the object was taken away, how was it done? The cameraman described the burn mark as being three times bigger than the rotunda building in Birmingham, so not something your average army lorry could simply carry away. However, perhaps heat from a smaller object in the field had melted snow around it giving the impression of a much larger one? Could it have been a plane or meteorite that crashed? Perhaps, but why would army trucks turn up if that was the case? The witness who later allegedly died described a "flying saucer" so could he have been wrong and misidentified a mundane object? If we can trust the report, one possible explanation could be the crash of a military, rather than civil, aircraft, which would explain the presence of the army. Radiatian burns? Hmmmmm. No military aircraft I am aware of uses any form of nuclear fuel source. Also, if the area was irradiated, wouldn't NBC suits have been much in evidence, and surely the area would have been cordoned off for a considerable time, thus drawing public and media attention?

A very interesting case but some major inconsistancies make me question its complete reliability.
 

robbo616

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#2
Where are the 100 soldiers now?

One of them would have been able to corroborate the account...
 

corsair2000e

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#3
robbo616 said:
Where are the 100 soldiers now?

One of them would have been able to corroborate the account...
Not to mention the police officers who were supposed to be at the site, hospital workers treating the irradiated witness, other members of the ATV OB team, etc. On the evidence Redfern presented it does sound rather flimsy to me. Perhaps there was an incident on the Chase. A crashed military plane, perhaps, but even that is doubtful. Stricken aircraft rarely fall from the sky as fireballs, rather they become so when hitting the ground. Also, debris would have been scattered over a wide area and accident investigators would have been there for days. My gut reaction is that, on the evidence supplied, it is highly doubtful that a UFO or anything else crashed that night.
 
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