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African Man-Beasts

DeadZebedee

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One of the male chimps I worked with was an absolute unit, very big, good looking lad. But nothing like these guys!
 

lordmongrove

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One of the male chimps I worked with was an absolute unit, very big, good looking lad. But nothing like these guys!
I used to be a zookeeper at Twycross. I worked mainly with reptiles but as a trainee i worked with a bit of everything. The chimps were savage, filthy and brutal. There is no other animal i dislike as much. Where abouts id you work?
 

DeadZebedee

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I used to be a zookeeper at Twycross. I worked mainly with reptiles but as a trainee i worked with a bit of everything. The chimps were savage, filthy and brutal. There is no other animal i dislike as much. Where abouts id you work?
I worked at Dudley with primates and reps. Then Twycross with all the apes. We got the chimps back into more "natural" size groups before I left. I was always more of an Orang man myself
 

lordmongrove

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Anthropoids unknown from Congo
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When after three years of camp life in the forest, ignoring the very existence of these monkeys, I asked my men why they had never told me anything, they replied: you did not never asked for it.
Charles Cordier 1960
By Michel Ballot



The habitat of large African primates is shrinking by about 2% per year. The common chimpanzee is found in 21 African countries. The bonobo is only present in the Democratic Republic of Congo where in twenty years their population has grown from 100,000 to 10,000 individuals. As for the gorilla, we find it in bad shape. The population of the eastern lowland gorilla has declined from 17,000 individuals in 1994 to less than 5,000 today. The mountain gorilla has little more than 700 individuals. In the area of the Congolese basin there are a little less than 100,000 in total, all subspecies combined. In 2003, a UNESCO report stated that at the rate of deforestation, in 2030, only 10% of great ape habitat will have been spared in Africa.
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The Democratic Republic of Congo is the second country in the world where the forest is disappearing the fastest after Brazil. Globally, around 38,000 km² were destroyed last year, the equivalent of a football field every six seconds. Which makes 2019 the third most devastating year for primary forests in two decades.

With these gloomy prospects how to make new discoveries?
Let us not forget that the mountain gorilla was not discovered until 1901 by the German Matschie but was widely known to local people under the names of Ngagi or Ngila.
Let us not forget that cryptozoology is a mainly historical science which tells the story of living beings at a very specific period and which is not always the one in which we live. A description will be made at a determined period, in a determined region, by determined populations. Many testimonies are old and they are from time to time brought up to date thanks to the oral tradition very present in Africa. A time A in a normal period of human evolution would almost resemble a point B especially in very isolated areas, but the transmission can be skewed by time and strong distant testimonies from other decades may actually be part. of the present thanks to the collective conscience transmitted in these regions from generation to generation.

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Michel Ballot, with Bernard Heuvelmans, and a few years later, on an expedition to Congo-DRC, collecting valuable information from the population.

But anyway and from my years of investigation in the field it goes without saying that all testimony is important and in any case conceals a sometimes very important part of the truth.
Since our first exploration of the Nki Falls in 2011, we are convinced that in the area above the falls live or have lived a population of wild men or unknown anthropoids. This information was confirmed to us in 2017 and 2018. We have been working with the tracker Blaise for several years and he is a true professional of the forest, its inhabitants, its topography, its dangers.

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Nki Falls
 

lordmongrove

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Blaise lives with his family in a camp along the Dja River not far from the small village of Ndongo. In 2016, when we reached the top of the falls by climbing them head-on, he told us for the first time about the unique experience he had lived and shared twenty years ago. Before returning to this extraordinary tale, let us ask ourselves the question whether, historically, encounters with unknown bipedal beings have already occurred in these regions.

The great primates of Bili

The groups of Australopithecines that populated this sub-region of the African continent until about a million years ago became increasingly rare with the arrival of the genus Homo and they largely died out after taking refuge. in very isolated areas. One of the characteristic examples is the recent discovery of what was called the Bili monkey, found in an area that was historically to be more important than the current Democratic Republic of the northern Congo. Primatologist Shelly Williams encountered this anthropoid, known to locals as the lion killer monkey. Four of them were seen silent and huge. Was a new species of great ape born or were they simply chimpanzees with little-known physical characteristics and behaviors?



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Bili monkey (photo Bernard Dupont)


The origins of this mystery go back to the 19th century, in 1898 more precisely, when an officer of the former Belgian army in the Congo brought back three skulls from this region which fell into oblivion because they could not be classified as sub - species. In 1908, two monkeys were killed, their skulls having sagittal ridges characteristic of gorillas. Already at that time the villagers distinguished the "tree beater" ie the so-called classic chimpanzees from "lion killers. Nothing more until 1996 when the naturalist Karl Amman heard of a population of forgotten gorillas known as the Uele gorillas (actually huge chimpanzees) living in the forest areas of the small towns of Bili and Bondo . He went in 2001 in the company of the famous primatologist George Shaller, a great specialist in the mountain gorilla, as well as Colin Groves, an undisputed specialist in the great African primates, in the area where these mysterious animals were supposed to live. Nests were spotted as well as feces. After investigation the naturalists concluded that they were called lion eaters or lion killers by the local populations. The following year Williams and Amman captured on video one of these monkeys, a female most certainly with a head like a gorilla but with a flat face, the build substantially equal to that of the gorilla. According to the locals they emit howls at night that no chimpanzee would dare to emit for fear of hyenas and other predators. They would be fierce and even capable of killing a lion. The top of the skull has a sagittal bony crest similar to that of the adult male gorilla but all other aspects of its morphology are reminiscent of chimpanzees. Examination of hairs found in a nest reveals DNA almost similar to that of the chimpanzee as well as examination of feces, suggesting a similar diet.



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In this article published ten years ago, an inventory of the presence of great apes in Africa and Asia.


So why did these animals get so big? Pascal Gagneux of the San Diego Zoo suggested instead a local chromosomal variation. For Steve Menken of the Institute for Biodiversity and Dynamics in Amsterdam who followed the evolution of the discovery of these primates and according to the analyzes of the mitochondrial DNA carried out on hairs, we would be in the presence of a genetic heritage halfway between two known subspecies of chimpanzees. On the other hand for Karl Amman, this small population could have evolved far from other species of chimpanzees and have developed certain specific characteristics. Indeed the region where they live is surrounded by rivers, there is no genetic exchange with other chimpanzees and Amman to suggest that they could be particularly primitive chimpanzees, large and robust.



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The Bili monkey, aka Eastern Chimpanzee, aka the mysterious Bondo monkey, aka the lion slayer, aka Pan Troglodytes Schweinfurthii (photo Bernard Dupont)


Is a new species? A giant chimpanzee, a hybrid of gorilla and chimpanzee. For some specialists, it could be a population of chimpanzees isolated in a patch of forest and including a few large individuals whose genes have marked the offspring. For others, gorilla characters occasionally appear in chimpanzees.

What is interesting is that this great ape sleeps on the ground like gorillas, does not seem to have enemies fearful of neither lions nor panthers. Footprints were cast and they were on average five centimeters larger than those of a gorilla.



There was a long discussion about the possible classification of this great ape. Today it is believed to be quite simply a subspecies of chimpanzee. It is probable because I do not believe neither in a hybridization. On the other hand, I rather believe in a clear differentiation compared to a known species according to the isolation of this population. In any case, the world press echoed this discovery in October 2004: the BBC News edition of October 10 headlined: New giant monkey discovered in the Democratic Republic of Congo.



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So what to think of this discovery?

We nickname these lion-killing monkeys. This predator is only rarely seen in the jungle because we have seen some sightings in some forest areas of Kenya in the past. It does not seem reasonable to me to think that there could be a relatively large population of lions in jungle areas in the Democratic Republic of Congo, certainly some isolated animals far from their current range. On the other hand, these monkeys could possibly defend themselves from the panthers and see them kill because they were observed consuming the body of one of them. Would they be scavengers?

Their preferred terrain has been little studied because their location has been located in a zone of civil war which devastated the country for several years. However scientists were able to explore this vast area of 7,000 square kilometers, discovering the same chimpanzees with a culture well differentiated from other subspecies.

On their way of life and according to the scientists who were able to approach them we are in the presence of a population of chimpanzees of disproportionate size and size (twice the average weight of an ordinary chimpanzee with a size of about 1 , 80 meters for a weight of 90 kilos) with a unique positioning in the food chain. According to these two researchers their aggressiveness is overrated and unlike the gorilla which can be aggressive by its intimidating maneuvers, this species does not charge, showing rather discreet and silently slipping away from humans. This attitude was confirmed by a Belgian forester living in the DRC Johnny Flament, who observed the Bili monkey from 3 meters away (Hubert Roy - personal communication of February 23, 2004 to Benoit Grison who adds that according to Flament this creature is also known locally under the name of Sokomotou term which would refer to its humanoid aspect). On this important point and following the research of Shelly Williams, it was Cleve Hicks of the University of Amsterdam who was able to visit the living area of these monkeys. To get there you have to travel about 40 kilometers through the jungle from the nearest road. The monkeys he was able to observe slept in large nests for the night on the ground, apparently without being afraid of panthers and golden cats, particularly aggressive felines. On this important point and following the research of Shelly Williams, it was Cleve Hicks of the University of Amsterdam who was able to visit the living area of these monkeys. To get there you have to travel about 40 kilometers through the jungle from the nearest road. The monkeys he was able to observe slept in large nests for the night on the ground, apparently without being afraid of panthers and golden cats, particularly aggressive felines. On this important point and following the research of Shelly Williams, it was Cleve Hicks of the University of Amsterdam who was able to visit the living area of these monkeys. To get there you have to travel about 40 kilometers through the jungle from the nearest road. The monkeys he was able to observe slept in large nests for the night on the ground, apparently without being afraid of panthers and golden cats, particularly aggressive felines.



 

lordmongrove

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Despite the very marked differences both morphologically (sagittal ridge developed as a consequence of a heavy jaw, massive animals due to a possible genetic drift produced recently in this region from a small group of large chimpanzees called the founder effect) and socially with the common chimpanzee, DNA analyzes unveiled in 2005 and 2006 show that they are chimpanzees of the subspecies Pan troglodytes schweinfurthi.

On this matter I will leave the last word to the French biologist Benoît Grison:

In the forest habitats of Bondo and Bili, we have to deal with an enormous population of chimpanzees, behaving globally like gorillas, with specific social functioning, and finely differentiated behavior compared to other chimpanzees. The chimpanzees - gorillas of Ouellé are a fascinating case, because exacerbated, among these cultures - chimpanzees discovered 20 years ago, particularly in the Taï forest in Côte d'Ivoire: populations of chimpanzees living in ecological conditions completely comparable, nonetheless develop ways of being and collective learning specific to their group which place them on the edge of culture.

Here is the first link that allows us to believe in the discovery of a totally new or differentiated species in our research areas. But there are others.

We find everywhere many testimonies reporting encounters with unknown hominids in Central Africa. Here are some examples well known to cryptozoologists. It was in the Amazon review that the zoologist Jean - Jacques Barloy , related some disturbing facts which first appeared in the San Francisco Examiner of May 12, 1929 and which suggest the existence of unknown hominins.



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The Bertelli expedition

Here are the facts: in April 1929, strange news circulated in Berlin. It comes from Cameroon and more particularly from a plantation run by Germans. According to the latter, an elephant hunter came face to face with a group of great apes and shot one of them. When the hunter examined the being he had injured, he was amazed to find that it was a half-human girl, dark skinned but… blond hair. She just had time to give her assassin a reproachful look and expired. At around the same time, however, another testimony gave a certain weight to that of the Germans. But let's start with the beginning of this incredible story.

In 1915, a French expedition sank into the forest of the French Congo. It is run by Louis Bertelli who, as his name does not indicate, is… Danish. He is accompanied by his wife, who is Swedish. The goal of the expedition is to verify the existence, in the vicinity of the confluence of the Congo and the Ubano, a tribe of men - apes. These, according to a report from a previous expedition, are hairy, with long arms and short legs. They would walk upright and have a rudiment of language. Arrived in Léopoldville, the expedition has a lot of trouble recruiting Africans, none of them wanting to go to the region in question and especially not to go and kill monkey-men, because that is the Danish's goal. He must promise to do them no harm.

The members of the expedition were never to be seen again and one of its ships was found empty and capsized. The tragedy was forgotten. In 1928, however, an African recounts the strange adventure which befell him. Fleeing the Belgian Congo he had sought to reach the French Congo and had sunk into the heart of the forest. This is how he would have met the men - apes. Following one of their troops, he reached their village made up of huts made of branches and leaves, installed in the trees. The man ambushed near this village, not daring to approach it because the males were on guard. One night he was surprised to see a young black girl with blond hair come down from one of the huts and wash her face in a nearby river. Curiously, she was not hairy. The African tried to engage in dialogue. She didn't understand any of the languages he tried to speak to her in, but answered in some kind of ape-like, half-human dialect. The creature then takes the man by the hand and leads him to a tomb. She digs lightly in the earth and extracts bones and a lock of blond hair. Obviously it is a loved one who is buried there, probably his mother. At this moment a clamor resounds, that of the monkey men who noticed the disappearance of the girl. She hastens to join her tribe, the African hearing him dialogue with her in a rudimentary language that she had used with him.

If we link these cases together, it is possible to reconstruct the following scenario: the Bertelli expedition was massacred by ferocious inhabitants of the forest where an accident occurred on the river. The only survivor, the blonde Madame Bertelli was taken in by the ape men and by force became the companion of one of them. She had a daughter who will meet the fleeing African and who will be killed by the hunter. Indeed this young woman was killed in Cameroon, neighboring country of the current Congo and therefore of the former French Congo.

Truly extraordinary and dramatic story with a tragic ending.

But there are many other equally incredible encounters that have taken place in the great Congo Basin. Here are a few.

Charles Cordier's Kakundakaris and Kikombas

In the current Democratic Republic of Congo, it was in 1960 that the Swiss hunter Charles Cordier studied two very distinct hominoid forms in the Kivu region. One, the kakundakari, small and robust, the other, the kikomba or Apamandi, a hairy giant.

Regarding the kakundakari, Cordier gathered valuable information about it: footprints comparable to those of a child, often parallel to the traces of a herd of bush pigs, whitish black, covered with sparse hairs, the hairs of his hair is straight and forms a sort of mane on the back of his neck. It is impossible to kill it with a spear because it dodges it as nimbly as the baboon. He walks upright, does not climb, does not know how to swim, but is able to cross a stream on driftwood. He retires at night to a cave or an empty tree trunk. We meet him alone or in pairs or three. If he finds a fishing net, he strives to put a finger in each stitch, as if he wanted to count them. He amuses himself by piling up pieces of wood as if he wanted to make a fire, but cannot.

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Kakundakaris were killed by villagers in particular during the years 1918-1919 by two old hunters who told Cordier that the being had, for one, the head of a child, for the other, the head of a child. a monkey. Many testimonies speak of the existence of this small hominid, mostly ancient, but part of the life of the jungle and its inhabitants. We can therefore only subscribe to these meetings where any scientific interest is excluded and this is what Cordier understood, who was unable to complete his research but who was so convinced of the existence of this being, that he decided, despite the very serious troubles linked to the country's independence, to stay for ten days in the great forest with about twenty of his best trackers, ignoring the events of June 30, 1960. He discovered on the road from Walikalé to Masisi, near a cave, a clear imprint of a child's foot that was no more than 12 centimeters long, the thumb longer than in humans and the fifth little finger n 'not appearing (atrophied according to Cordier). In the cave he noticed pieces of wood strewn about. He also found near the village of Tulakua four very deep and clear footprints with a length of 30.5 centimeters and a width of 11 centimeters.

In the opinion of Christian Le Noël, a great hunting guide in these regions during the second half of the 20th century, the kakundakari would indeed have long and straight hair as well as the fact of not having articulate speech. For him, they are perhaps the last survivors of a race descending from Australopithecines.

The second hominin of these areas of Central Africa in which Cordier was interested is the kikomba. Here is his description of it: he always walks upright, often has a stick or the handle of an ax in his hand, he climbs trees to collect honey from bees and like a chimpanzee, drops from the top of his head. 'he is surprised. He eats the meké-meké tuber and the ginger fruits. The gorilla also eats these two plants, but unlike this one it demolishes rotten tree trunks to remove the juicy larvae. The kikomba howls at night in a much more frightening way than the gorilla, especially when it hugs the ridges. However, some say it is the cry of the aquatic buckshot. He wanders in the forest and does not take shelter in caves. He is known to have inordinate strength and does not hesitate to rush on a man to fight with him and beat him with a stick. The only defense then consists in playing dead; indeed at this moment the animal moves away to look for something to cover the body of its victim and it is therefore the occasion for the unfortunate victim to slip away.

Cordier collected many testimonies on the existence of the kikomba.
 

lordmongrove

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Artist's views Kakundakari / Kikomba


It relates in particular the misdeeds they can cause in hunting camps by tearing leaves from roofs and shaking huts. He was told the story of a traveling trader chased down the road by one of them and the man to save himself threw his goods and rushed into a canoe to get away. He watched as the kikomba grabbed a bundle, opened it and dispersed its contents.

Cordier relates another precise testimony: he met a mining engineer who told him that a certain Pierre Leon, a prospector of the Sobaki mining company, while he was prospecting an excavation, saw out of the corner of his eye , walked past someone and realized at the same time that no one could know he was working in that area. As he got up he saw a kikomba moving away from the back.

Another testimony dating from January 1960 relates the adventure of a man who was pursued by a kikomba on the road leading to the Umate gold mine. According to the witness, the animal was walking upright, its long coarse hair covering its face, which forced it to constantly shake its head to move it aside in order to see. Going to the scene of this meeting, Cordier spotted a remarkable imprint 20 centimeters long, very wide, the second finger far exceeding the toe. Cordier clarified that it was in no way either a chimpanzee's footprint, or that of a gorilla.

For his part, Christian Le Noël was able to gather information on the existence of the kikomba from one of his hunting colleagues in Gabon, Dany Mallaire, a great connoisseur of the local fauna. The latter, accompanied by Christian de Tuder, also a hunting guide, encountered three or four of these creatures in 1977 during a survey in the Setté-Cama region, in particular between Iguéla and the small Loango reserve:

I was driving through a clearing, the sound of the vehicle put to flight what I took at first for a small group of red primates, but to my surprise they started to flee towards the cover, running on their two legs rear, without ever using their limbs before as do all breeds of monkeys, including chimpanzees and gorillas. These creatures with dark brown coats, while that of chimpanzees and gorillas are black, were squatting for food and began to flee when the guide arrived.



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Louango Natural Park in Gabon, 175km of uninhabited coastline.


Le Noël also collected a testimony from the Central African Republic in 1989 when he was in Bangui, during a mission he was carrying out for the European Community:

A close friend of a French officer commanding President Kolimba's presidential guard told me the following: this French officer responsible for security throughout the country had access to all the reports made by the bush prefects. His attention was drawn to a report from the prefect of Mbaïki, an area of dense forest, located about 80 kilometers west of Bangui. This was telling a strange story. Local hunters had gone hunting in the forest to make meat. They shot down what they took to be a great ape, but once on the ground, it looked so much like a hairy human that they brought it whole to the Prefect, also intrigued by the sight of the creature. He made a report to the President of the Republic and had the remains buried.



We discussed the contribution of Jacqueline Roumeguere-Eberhardt, the study of unknown primates in Africa c and Article


It would therefore be a hominoid standing upright, speaking an unknown language, leaving huge footprints, also described by the researcher Jacqueline Roumeguère - Eberhardt, whose size could reach two meters. He often carries a huge club, a small shrub. These rudimentary instruments would serve him to kill the buffaloes he does not seem to fear and whose flesh he likes. He is not afraid of men because he is naturally peaceful and in reality shows more curiosity than aggression towards them. Despite Cordier turn, according to his testimonies, this being can be particularly aggressive.

This is what Bernard Heuvelmans thought about its identity: this group has a status that is still uncertain, in any case controversial, in the system of nature. Does it constitute a particular family, distinct from that of men, a subspecies of the latter, an entirely separate genus of men properly so called, or even a simple human species? No one can decide the question absolutely.

This type of testimony on the life of a living being unknown to science but known to local populations is simply breathtaking. It relates the manners of a hominist, resulting from encounters in the middle of the forest, far from any human development, far from media coverage, far from science, far from exogenous elements. It once again reflects the intimism that exists between local people and the rest of living things.

The record of unknown monkeys and little-known hominoids from the forests of Central Africa is very complex. The major work which has made it possible to see a little more clearly in this area is undoubtedly the work of Bernard Heuvelmans ( Les Bêtes Humaines d'Afrique , published by Plon in 1980).

Two thoughts could serve as a conclusion to this chapter.

That of Ivan T. Sanderson: as time passed and as the two branches proliferated and gave rise to different varieties, a deeper and deeper gap grew. It is not because certain men (let us say rather hominids) continued to be endowed with a fleece and small brains that they remained anthropoids. And reciprocally, it is not because the current anthropoids are still completely covered with fur and still have small brains, that their evolution from their original form is less extensive than ours. They just moved in other directions.

That of Bernard Heuvelmans: if these forest relics still contain most of the species they have secretly harbored since time immemorial, they are on the other hand easier to access because of their depletion.



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This file of unknown wild or anthropoid men led me during my expeditions on the search for Mokélé - Mbembé to wonder about their existence in the immense area of my travels between southern Cameroon and northern Congo.

On this subject, with our team, I was able to collect very interesting information on the survival of bipedal beings unknown to the Dja river area and in particular an exceptional testimony from one of the trackers who work with us, testimony that was there. 'main object of our last mission in January 2020.It appears that in the immense forest and border areas of southern Cameroon and northern Congo, numerous testimonies point to mysterious beings resembling gorillas or chimpanzees but who do not certainly are. To come back to our 2016 expedition, our tracker Blaise told us that he had witnessed an extraordinary encounter in an area located about three to four days of walking in the very difficult forest of access which follows the falls Nki.



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Tracker Blaise


It was when we reached the top of our ascent, after a few hours of well-deserved rest that our main tracker told us about this encounter. Twenty years earlier, during an exploratory mission with people from the Cameroonian government, and as part of the exploration of this entirely landlocked and unexplored area, the team following the banks of the upper Dja river discovered from the other beside the river a series of caves from where they could see a certain number of living beings apparently resembling gorillas or chimpanzees but which, by questioning at length the main witness were absolutely not. Tracker Blaise is used to the great rainforest, lives in contact with this forest and perfectly recognizes the species living there. The observation lasted several minutes without the humans being recognized thanks to the separation with the river. These beings who were standing were coming and going near the caves.

This observation is of course exceptional. It dates back over twenty years. One might think that there was the effect of surprise in an almost impenetrable forest and any encounter with animals is always treated with great caution especially in an area known for populations of forest elephants and gorillas. 'having very rare contact with human beings. The surprise effect could nevertheless have resulted in a poor appreciation of the very morphology of these living beings, but from my personal experience of more than fifteen years of research in tropical forests and the contacts that I was able to link with the pygmies. and trackers, it seems unlikely to me that confusion is the hypothesis to be adopted.

Our next expedition in October 2021, will be partly devoted to the search for these caves, in a mountainous geographical area where the term green hell very quickly calls into question our precariousness in a Nature ignored of the beaten track!

End



Initiated in the 1970s by B. Heuvelmans into the mysteries of the animal world, Michel Ballot has been devoting intense field research in the Congo since 2007 to the search for Mokélé MBembé. It is possible to support his research here.
 

lordmongrove

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I worked at Dudley with primates and reps. Then Twycross with all the apes. We got the chimps back into more "natural" size groups before I left. I was always more of an Orang man myself
Wow, when was this? I was at Twycross mid to late 80s. Did they still have Nile crocs at Dudley when you were there.
 

DeadZebedee

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I started at Twycross in about 2013, we would have probably worked with some of the same chimps. Unfortunately by the time I was at Dudley the rep collection wasn't what it once had been. We had dwarf crocs but the biggest reps we had were burms and a Salvator monitor.
 

lordmongrove

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I started at Twycross in about 2013, we would have probably worked with some of the same chimps. Unfortunately by the time I was at Dudley the rep collection wasn't what it once had been. We had dwarf crocs but the biggest reps we had were burms and a Salvator monitor.

Cheers, i was at Twycross in the mid 1980s. Nice to meet a fellow ex-keeper (or are you still doing it?)
 

lordmongrove

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:hahazebs: must be something about the place!
I was there when Molly Badham was in charge. She was the worst example of humanity i ever met. Ont only was she petty, bullying and spiteful she knew fuck all, and i mean fuck all about animals. The day i left i went berserk, utterly ape-shit at her and left her shaking with terror. Apparently it was the first time anybody had caller her out on her lack of knowledge and nastyness. The bitch got a taste of her own medicine that day and then some!
 

DeadZebedee

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I was there when Molly Badham was in charge. She was the worst example of humanity i ever met. Ont only was she petty, bullying and spiteful she knew fuck all, and i mean fuck all about animals. The day i left i went berserk, utterly ape-shit at her and left her shaking with terror. Apparently it was the first time anybody had caller her out on her lack of knowledge and nastyness. The bitch got a taste of her own medicine that day and then some!
Good on you! I only agreed to move there after I found out they were in the process of changing everything about the way the animals were kept. Nathalie was still about but was in the bungalow and had no input into the zoo. It was a pleasure to undo some of the shit Molly did to those chimps.
 

lordmongrove

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Good on you! I only agreed to move there after I found out they were in the process of changing everything about the way the animals were kept. Nathalie was still about but was in the bungalow and had no input into the zoo. It was a pleasure to undo some of the shit Molly did to those chimps.
They were still having tea parties when i was there.
 
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