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Alternative Medicine: Chiropractic

Mal_Adjusted

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Chiropractic school angers FSU professors

Some threaten to resign over the proposed school.

By RON MATUS, Times Staff Writer
Published December 29, 2004

do check out the map:

http://www.sptimes.com/2004/12/29/image ... map.gifmap

To poke fun at Florida State University's bid for a chiropractic school, an FSU professor has created a new campus map. Opponents of the proposed school say more than 500 faculty members have signed petitions against it.

A growing number of professors in the Florida State University College of Medicine are saying they will resign if FSU administrators continue to pursue a proposed chiropractic school.

"I would no longer wish to volunteer my teaching energies to FSU medical school, should it encompass a school of chiropractic," wrote Dr. Ian Rogers, an assistant professor at FSU's Pensacola campus, in a Dec. 15 e-mail. "This is plainly ludicrous!!!!"

The threatened resignations - at least seven to date, all from assistant professors who work part time - reflect a belief among many in the medical establishment that chiropractic is a "pseudo-science" that leads to unnecessary and sometimes harmful treatments. Professors are even circulating a parody map of campus that places a fictional Bigfoot Institute, School of Astrology and Crop Circle Simulation Laboratory near a future chiropractic school.

But the professors' stance has a political aim, too.

Opposition is clearly mounting as the chiropractic school heads for crucial votes in January before the FSU board of trustees and the state Board of Governors.

In fact, the school is now seen as a test case for the fledgling Board of Governors, which critics have accused of kowtowing to Gov. Jeb Bush and the Legislature on the higher education issues it is supposed to oversee.

FSU was closed for the holidays Tuesday. FSU president T.K. Wetherell, provost Larry Abele and John Thrasher, chairman of the FSU board of trustees, could not be reached for comment.

But Sen. Dennis Jones, the Treasure Island Republican who spearheaded legislative support for the school in the spring, said the professors were "overreacting."

He accused anti-chiropractic groups from outside the state of stirring faculty opposition at FSU.

"If they resign, so be it," said Jones, a chiropractor himself. The instructors don't deserve to teach at FSU, he said, "if they're putting their credentials with people known for promoting professional bigotry."

The Legislature appropriated $9-million annually for the chiropractic school, which was pushed by Jones and then-Senate President Jim King, R-Jacksonville, an FSU graduate. It would be the only school of its kind in the country.

As supporters envision it, more than 100 new faculty members would train legions of chiropractors, with a special emphasis on Hispanic and African-American students. The school would also draw lucrative federal grants in alternative medicine.

Planning began years ago, but criticism didn't ramp up until after the legislative session.

Some opponents see the school as an end run around the Board of Governors, which oversees the state's 11 universities but has yet to consider the chiropractic school. Last week, a group headed by former university system chancellor E.T. York filed a lawsuit against the board, accusing it of failing to flex its constitutionally granted muscle and pointing to the chiropractic school as a prime example.

But some FSU faculty members are upset, too, fearing the school will shatter FSU's academic reputation. The list of critics include FSU's two Nobel laureates - Robert Schreiffer, a physicist, and Harold Walter Kroto, a chemist - and Robert Holton, the chemistry professor who developed the cancer-fighting drug Taxol, which has brought FSU tens of millions of dollars in royalties.

In recent weeks, more than 500 faculty members have signed petitions against the chiropractic school, including about 70 in the medical college, said Dr. Raymond Bellamy, an assistant professor who is leading the charge against the proposal. The medical college has more than 100 faculty members.

Some of them say they're willing to do more than sign a petition.

"I teach wonderful medical students from Florida State University here in Orlando," Dr. James W. Louttit wrote in an e-mail to Bellamy, who shared it with the St. Petersburg Times. "If they decide to start a chiropractic school I would no longer be able to support this program."

"It should come as no surprise that no major medical institution in this country, public or private, has embraced chiropractic medicine," wrote Dr. Henry Ho, a Winter Park physician and FSU assistant professor, in another e-mail. "If Florida State University were to do so, its fledgling attempt for credibility as a medical institution of stature would be severely jeopardized."

The situation at FSU isn't the first time chiropractors have sought to tie themselves to an established university.

In the late 1990s, faculty at York University in Toronto - one of Canada's largest schools - considered plans to affiliate with Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. The plan would have brought York millions of dollars in new facilities and donations and given the chiropractic school academic credibility.

After a bitter, years-long fight, York faculty narrowly vetoed the plan in 2001.

At FSU, faculty have not officially voiced their concerns about the chiropractic school. Bellamy said they fear retaliation from lawmakers if they do.

"Everybody wants somebody else to kill it," he said.

Ron Matus can be reached at 727 893-8873 or [email protected]
[Last modified December 29, 2004, 00:19:14]

http://www.sptimes.com/2004/12/29/State/Chiropractic_school_a.shtml

mal

(persoanlly i'd rather chiropractors got the best training possible. and what about academic freedom?)

mal
 
Chiropracty (chiropraxis???) is taught at a basic level in UK medical courses and I believe is recognised in France as a reputable speciality
 
Silenced, the writer who dared to say chiropractice is bogus
Support grows for author facing crippling libel action for attack on spinal treatment
By Steve Connor, Science Editor
Thursday, 4 June 2009

A galaxy of luminaries from the disparate worlds of science, comedy, the arts and humanities – from Ricky Gervais to the president of the Royal Society – have come out in support of a science writer who is being sued by chiropractors for saying they practise "bogus treatments".

Dr Simon Singh allegedly libelled the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) in an article claiming the association is the respectable face of the chiropractic profession and yet it happily promotes "bogus" therapies. The BCA demanded an apology and a retraction, and in its libel action won a preliminary court ruling against Dr Singh last month. In it, Mr Justice Eady ruled that Dr Singh's use of the word "bogus" meant he was accusing the BCA of being dishonest and backing treatments it knew did not work. He refutes this, saying that "alternative therapists who offer treatments unsupported by reasonable evidence are deluded rather than deliberately dishonest".

Dr Singh announced yesterday that he intends to appeal against the ruling, which has already cost him about £100,000 in legal fees but won him the backing of more than 100 prominent figures – including a Nobel laureate.

The signatories to the statement in support of Dr Singh include Gervais, the actor Stephen Fry, the scientist Richard Dawkins, Lord Rees of Ludlow, president of the Royal Society, former government chief scientist Sir David King, the novelist Martin Amis and the comedian and doctor Harry Hill. "We, the undersigned, believe that it is inappropriate to use the English libel laws to silence critical discussion of medical practice and scientific evidence," the statement reads.

"The English law of libel has no place in scientific disputes about evidence. The BCA should discuss the evidence outside of a courtroom."


etc...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/scien ... 96408.html
 
Simon Singh wins libel court battle

Science writer accused of libel when he doubted chiropractors' claims of success in treatment of some childhood conditions


The science writer Simon Singh has won his court of appeal battle for the right to rely on the defence of fair comment in a libel action.

Singh was accused of libel by the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) over an opinion piece he wrote in the Guardian in April 2008.

He suggested there was a lack of evidence for the claims some chiropractors make on treating certain childhood conditions including colic and asthma.

The BCA alleged that Singh had in effect accused its leaders of knowingly supporting bogus treatments.

In May last year, high court judge Mr Justice Eady, in a preliminary ruling in the dispute, held that Singh's comments were factual assertions rather than expressions of opinion – which meant he could not use the defence of fair comment.

Today, the lord chief justice, Lord Judge, master of the rolls Lord Neuberger and Lord Justice Sedley allowed Singh's appeal, ruling that the high court judge had "erred in his approach".

Singh described the ruling as "brilliant" but added: "It is extraordinary this action has cost £200,000 to establish the meaning of a few words."

The Singh case has become a cause celebre for science journalism and prompted calls for reforms to the defamation law to keep it out of scientific disputes.

After the ruling, Tracey Brown, spokeswoman for the Coalition for Libel Reform, said: "We are delighted with the judges' ruling but it does not go far enough.

"There is a cardiologist currently being sued by a device manufacturer, we have researchers who have been unable to publish their critique of lie detector technology because of threats of libel action.

"A major science journal is also currently being sued and our academics are being told to pull down blogs.

"We urgently need a public interest defence so that we can all be sure of our rights as publishers, writers, authors and academics."

Dr Evan Harris MP, the Liberal Democrat MP, said: "This sensible judgment is no substitute for fundamental law reform. It is no kind of justice for a scientist to spend £200,000 and two years of his life just to get halfway through a case. The political parties must now all commit to reform of the law to free scientific speech and responsible journalism from the threat of penury."

Handing down the unanimous judgment of the court, Lord Judge said Mr Singh's defence had set out the undisputed fact that the BCA promoted chiropractic as a treatment for infants and young children suffering from colic, sleeping and feeding problems, frequent ear infections, asthma and prolonged crying.

Mr Singh also set out, ailment by ailment and study by study, his reasons for considering that none of the available epidemiological evidence reliably supported the BCA claims.

The BCA contested his view - "again ailment by ailment and study by study" - and asserted that there was some dependable evidence for its claims.

Until Mr Justice Eady blocked it in the high court, Mr Singh's primary defence to libel was that his were expressions of opinion and fair comment.

Lord Judge ruled that the high court judge, "notwithstanding his very great experience", had erred by treating an issue of opinion "as an issue of verifiable fact".

Mr Singh's words, "however one represents or paraphrases their meaning, are, in our judgment, expressions of opinion".

He said: "The opinion may be mistaken, but to allow the party which has been denounced on the basis of it to compel its author to prove in court what he has asserted by way of argument is to invite the court to become an Orwellian ministry of truth."

Ruling that Mr Justice Eady had erred in his approach, Lord Judge said the court adopted what Judge Easterbrook, now chief judge of the US seventh circuit court of appeals, had said in a 1994 libel action over a scientific controversy.

Judge Easterbrook had declared that those claiming they had been libelled "cannot, by simply filing suit and crying 'character assassination!', silence those who hold divergent views, no matter how adverse those views may be to plaintiffs' interests.

"Scientific controversies must be settled by the methods of science rather than by the methods of litigation. More papers, more discussion, better data, and more satisfactory models - not larger awards of damages - mark the path towards superior understanding of the world around us."

Lord Judge said libel was an area of law sometimes concerned with "conflicting issues of great sensitivity involving both the protection of good reputation and the maintenance of the principles of free expression".

He said it was "somewhat alarming" to read in the standard textbook, The Law of Libel and Slander, that the defence of fair comment was still "dogged by misleading terminology".

Calling for changes, Lord Judge said: "We question why this should be so. The law of defamation surely requires that language should not be used which obscures the true import of a defence to an action for damages."

Other countries, including New Zealand, Australia and the Republic of Ireland, now described the defence of fair comment as "honest opinion".

Lord Judge said describing the defence "for what it is would lend greater emphasis to its importance as an essential ingredient of the right to free expression".

"'Honest opinion' better reflects the realities. This appeal must be allowed."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/apr/01/simon-singh-wins-libel-court
 
http://www.kcci.com/news/chiropractor-suspended-after-performing-exorcisms/32386134

LAMONI, Iowa —According to documents released by the Iowa Board of Chiropractic on Wednesday, the license of a chiropractor has been suspended for "engaging in sexual contact with several patients."

The board said Charles Manuel, of Lamoni, engaged in unethical contact.

According to documents, Manuel "bartered sex for services with some of these patients" and "performed exorcisms as part of his chiropractic treatment of patients."

Manuel voluntarily surrendered his chiropractic license. He is not allowed to seek reinstatement for at least 10 years.

People in Lamoni, population 2,300, said they were shocked to hear the news.

"That's ridiculous, I mean an exorcism?" said Robert Jackson.

Jackson's apartment is just across the street from Manuel's former office.

"It's extremely scary. I'm appalled that it was going on exactly right across the street from where I'm staying. I don't know, I'm baffled," said Jackson.

Dr. Bryan Nowlin once shared the office with Dr. Manuel, but now he practices by himself.

Nowlin told KCCI, "We didn't notice any of that stuff while he was here."

Lindsey Williams also lives across the street. She said she's relieved she's only visited Nowlin.

"I never heard that he had been doing anything like that, but I'm glad I went to the other chiropractor," said Williams.

KCCI caught Lyndsay Bellinger as she left the office. She said she went to Manuel as a child, but has been seeing Nowlin for years.

"I couldn't believe it. I was really surprised," said Lyndsay Bellinger.

"That's ridiculous. You got to maintain your professionalism," said Terry Bellinger.

"So crazy, I just dismiss it as that can't be right," said Bob Ramsey and Jerie Gail Ramsey.
 
Video of chiropractor cracking baby's spine 'extremely distressing'

Victoria’s health minister says she was “physically shaken” while watching a video of a Melbourne chiropractor cracking the spine of a four-day-old premature baby to treat colic.
Jill Hennessy said the video, which has had more than 40,000 views on YouTube, led her to call for an urgent crackdown on rogue operators who manipulate the backs of babies and children to treat conditions such as colic, autism, ear infections and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is also alleged some have advised parents against vaccinating their children.
etc

I'd like to crack someone's spine! :mad:

When I had back pain some years ago Techy sent me to his hand-trembler/chiropractor and I spent several miserable sessions having my back pushed around. The bloke doing it was visibly brassed off when my joints refused to crack.
I think they withheld the crack on purpose! :D
Expensive quackery.
 
The bloke doing it was visibly brassed off when my joints refused to crack.
I think they withheld the crack on purpose! :D
Expensive quackery.

If your joints had been quick-thinking, they should have made an ironic "quacking" sound, which would only sound like a "crack" to an idiot. Or maybe I need to get out more. Yes, that's probably it...
 
Come to think of it, there was a 'quacking' sound, but it wasn't ironic.
 
Eye damage isn't one of the risks one immediately considers with regard to chiropractic ...

A Chiropractor Adjusted Her Neck. Then This Woman's Vision Problems Began
A visit to the chiropractor took a sharp — and unexpected — twist when a 59-year-old woman developed vision problems after her treatment, according to a new report of the woman's case.

The woman had gone to the chiropractor for a neck manipulation intended to treat her headaches. After the visit, however, the woman developed three floating vision spots in her right eye. She described them as tadpole-shaped and continuously visible, according to report.

The first spot appeared in her eye immediately after her visit, and the other two showed up a day later, she told the doctors who examined her. These spots, it turns out, are symptoms of ruptures in the eye's blood vessels, known as preretinal hemorrhages. They were likely caused by a chiropractic technique known as high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation — a jarring method that involves the application of short, quick thrusts to the back of the patient's neck, the doctors reported. ...

Chiropractic work in the neck area has previously been linked to carotid-artery injuries, according to the repot. The carotid arteries supply blood to the eyes and brain.

But the new case is the first reported evidence of a forceful chiropractic technique affecting the jelly that fills the eye, known as the vitreous humor. High-speed manipulation of her neck may have detached part of the jelly globe from the back of her eye and caused bleeding, creating the floating "tadpoles" in her vision, the doctors reported. ...

About two months after the woman's "tadpole" eye spots first appeared, her vision returned to normal without any additional treatment, according to the report.

The findings were published online in the September issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports.

SOURCE: https://www.livescience.com/63744-eye-bleeding-chiropractor-visit.html
 
For some weird reason even the name chiropractor makes me want to stay well away from them.
 
For some weird reason even the name chiropractor makes me want to stay well away from them.
I saw an osteopath recently for a spasming scalene shoulder muscle (painful as ****!), and he was a great help. I did ask what the difference was between an osteopath and chiropractor, and he said that as much as anything it was a 'philosophical' difference. But one does have to sign a form which lists all manner of potential side effects, though I can't remember anything to do with the eyes.
 
I saw an osteopath recently for a spasming scalene shoulder muscle (painful as ****!), and he was a great help. I did ask what the difference was between an osteopath and chiropractor, and he said that as much as anything it was a 'philosophical' difference. But one does have to sign a form which lists all manner of potential side effects, though I can't remember anything to do with the eyes.
Interesting that. Glad he was able to help.
 
I suffer a periodic spasm between the shoulder blades, mostly on the right side and it does occasionally appear to cause problems with vision, possible due to the tension in the neck muscles that result. It manifests as a kind of mini-migraine. I generally treat it by asking Mrs Coal to run a fives ball (two thirds the size of a tennis ball, but made of compacted cork and rubber) over the offending muscles quite hard. It hurts but breaks the spasm, but it can take a week or two to resolve. I've got artefacts in my right eye right now for this reason.

Over the counter muscle relaxants can help (viz. Old Speckled Hen)
 
I suffer a periodic spasm between the shoulder blades, mostly on the right side and it does occasionally appear to cause problems with vision, possible due to the tension in the neck muscles that result. It manifests as a kind of mini-migraine. I generally treat it by asking Mrs Coal to run a fives ball (two thirds the size of a tennis ball, but made of compacted cork and rubber) over the offending muscles quite hard. It hurts but breaks the spasm, but it can take a week or two to resolve. I've got artefacts in my right eye right now for this reason.

Over the counter muscle relaxants can help (viz. Old Speckled Hen)

Why don’t you visit the eye hospital instead of resorting to balls?
 
Why don’t you visit the eye hospital instead of resorting to balls?
tbh I do need a new prescription for my glasses, but I've had this particular back spasm on and off for over two decades and I'm 'used' to it and it's effects.
 
A man who broke his neck as he was treated by a chiropractor shouted "You are hurting me," his widow told an inquest.

John Lawler, 80, was attending Chiropractic 1st in York in August 2017 when he said he could not feel his arms and became like a "ragdoll".

Mr Lawler was taken to York Hospital and later transferred to Leeds General Infirmary where he died the next day.


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-50380928
 
A man who broke his neck as he was treated by a chiropractor shouted "You are hurting me," his widow told an inquest.

John Lawler, 80, was attending Chiropractic 1st in York in August 2017 when he said he could not feel his arms and became like a "ragdoll".

Mr Lawler was taken to York Hospital and later transferred to Leeds General Infirmary where he died the next day.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-50380928

This is tragic, but very interesting. I'd love to chip in but will wait until the inquest is over.
 
But one does have to sign a form which lists all manner of potential side effects, though I can't remember anything to do with the eyes.
A disclaimer? Not worth the paper it's written on. ;)
 
This is tragic, but very interesting. I'd love to chip in but will wait until the inquest is over.
All over in September last year.

Chiropractor cleared of misconduct over treatment of patient who died

It said he became unresponsive and collapsed, and was taken by ambulance to hospital and passed away the next day. A post-mortem examination revealed he had suffered a broken neck and catastrophic damage to his spinal cord.

The committee said Mrs Scholten had, by her own admission, provided inaccurate and misleading information to a 999 call handler, to paramedics who arrived at the clinic and also in the patient's clinical records, and this was 'unprofessional.'


However, the committee accepted that none of this was done deliberately, or recklessly, and that the circumstances were exceptional, and it was likely she was suffering an 'acute stress reaction.'

"It was a fast moving, traumatic, unique set of events and the committee considered it was inevitable that Mrs Scholten would have been suffering from shock as a result of Patient A’s rapidly deteriorating condition, the need to give mouth to mouth resuscitation and to call for an ambulance.
 
I remember reading/hearing about this case. If I remember rightly this man had some sort of long term condition that means he probably should have waited for his NHS/conventional treatment rather than looking elsewhere.

Surely any alternative practitioner should ask all the relevant questions about a person's medical history/symptoms etc before they treat them to ensure they don't take on patients who may be put at risk from the treatments/therapies?

I was shocked to read about the case. Poor man and wife. I don't understand how the chiropractor has been cleared of misconduct. Surely she should have not made the errors she made, responded better once the emergency occurred etc.

I think it is shameful that many unscientific therapists are even permitted to practice in the UK and charge patients for the services. At the least harmful end of the scale it is charging for a placebo treatment which may not help or harm but at the harmful end it may persuade people to give up conventional treatments, interfere with conventional medicine, or harm/kill them.

I know others may disagree with my opinion. That is fine. I don't think that practitioner should be allowed to continue practicing at all.
 
I did ask what the difference was between an osteopath and chiropractor, and he said that as much as anything it was a 'philosophical' difference.
My Osteopath said he had a planned time-table of treatment to resolve my problem - and hinted that Chiropractor sessions were more "open-ended" ie never concluded.
 
My Osteopath said he had a planned time-table of treatment to resolve my problem - and hinted that Chiropractor sessions were more "open-ended" ie never concluded.
Yup, Techy used to go to a chiropractor/quack for back trouble. There was certainly no treatment plan, as in even (say) 'We'll try 4 sessions and see how we go.' It's a racket.
 
I remember reading/hearing about this case. If I remember rightly this man had some sort of long term condition that means he probably should have waited for his NHS/conventional treatment rather than looking elsewhere.

Surely any alternative practitioner should ask all the relevant questions about a person's medical history/symptoms etc before they treat them to ensure they don't take on patients who may be put at risk from the treatments/therapies?

I was shocked to read about the case. Poor man and wife. I don't understand how the chiropractor has been cleared of misconduct. Surely she should have not made the errors she made, responded better once the emergency occurred etc.

I think it is shameful that many unscientific therapists are even permitted to practice in the UK and charge patients for the services. At the least harmful end of the scale it is charging for a placebo treatment which may not help or harm but at the harmful end it may persuade people to give up conventional treatments, interfere with conventional medicine, or harm/kill them.

I know others may disagree with my opinion. That is fine. I don't think that practitioner should be allowed to continue practicing at all.
I agree with everything you say and indeed find you overly polite on the matter. :chuckle:
 
I don’t trust em whatsoever. Used to play in a band with one, a young guy who took over his fathers practice.
Nice enough dude but no way I’m letting him or any other quackopracter near my spine.
 
I have never been to a chiropractor, but have known several socially. I thought they were all frighteningly ignorant, and because they viewed themselves as health professionals, they gave their opinions on a variety of health topics – all of which I silently disagreed with. A sample:

Vitamin tablets are unnecessary because God gives us all we need in food
All apples contain the same kind and amount of nutrients, because they were all apples
Vitamin C tablets cause cancer
Spinal misalignment can cause cancer, and chiro adjustment was the cure
Spinal manipulation for humans was based in science, but spinal manipulation for animals was quackery because animal nerves were different than human nerves

With such a tempting array of opinions, it is hard to tell which is my favorite, but I’ll go with “Vitamin C tablets cause cancer.”

I have known a few people who went to a chiropractor for decades for spinal adjustment. They all reported instant but temporary relief. I think relieving a muscle spasm is effective for pain caused by the spasm, but it probably doesn’t do much for a long-term cure.
 
I have never been to a chiropractor, but have known several socially. I thought they were all frighteningly ignorant, and because they viewed themselves as health professionals, they gave their opinions on a variety of health topics – all of which I silently disagreed with. A sample:

Vitamin tablets are unnecessary because God gives us all we need in food
All apples contain the same kind and amount of nutrients, because they were all apples
Vitamin C tablets cause cancer
Spinal misalignment can cause cancer, and chiro adjustment was the cure
Spinal manipulation for humans was based in science, but spinal manipulation for animals was quackery because animal nerves were different than human nerves

With such a tempting array of opinions, it is hard to tell which is my favorite, but I’ll go with “Vitamin C tablets cause cancer.”

I have known a few people who went to a chiropractor for decades for spinal adjustment. They all reported instant but temporary relief. I think relieving a muscle spasm is effective for pain caused by the spasm, but it probably doesn’t do much for a long-term cure.
When I have a bad back, normally lower lumbar pain from stooping when gardening etc, I get a hunky man to massage it. Works well. ;)
 
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