Astronomical News

Bad Bungle

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It does look a lot like it was imagined to look - excellent.
Can some-one explain what I'm looking at please ? I presume it's not a photograph, so maybe a composite signal from an array of radio telecopes ? That would require software to interpret the data and build an image - maybe that's why a black hole looks like a torus (as anticipated), why atoms under an electron microscope look like the ball and stick models and why the Martian sky in the Viking photos was originally green (actually red but the software was calibrated to show all sky as blue).
 

hunck

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Can some-one explain what I'm looking at please ? I presume it's not a photograph, so maybe a composite signal from an array of radio telecopes ? That would require software to interpret the data and build an image - maybe that's why a black hole looks like a torus (as anticipated), why atoms under an electron microscope look like the ball and stick models and why the Martian sky in the Viking photos was originally green (actually red but the software was calibrated to show all sky as blue).
Yes it's a composite image formed from I think 8 radio telescopes around the world. There was a BBC prog about it last night, probably now on iplayer.

The photo image may not look that impressive but it is 55m light years away & not that large. They had to go to some lengths to get it, combining teams worldwide.

Weather conditions had to be clear at all locations at the same time. In addition, relative positions had to be calculated exactly. The telescope on Antarctica is on a moving ice sheet, & all of them moved several meters in altitude depending on the position of the moon & it's gravitational pull. All of this had to be accounted for. Hard drives had to be kept at optimum temperature - overheating would be disastrous. In short, everything had to work perfectly at the same time. The technical feat was quite exceptional.

I think they got far more data than just the image. Drives & drives of it. The programme is well worth a watch.
 
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Israel's first Lunar lander suffers a glitch, which has greatly extended its orbit. Hopefully will not prevent the lander from errm ... landing:

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.theregister.co.uk/AMP/2019/03/06/space_roundup/
Sadly it has crash landed. Or was it shot down by missiles from a nazi Moonbase?

The first privately funded mission to the Moon has crashed on the lunar surface, in a blow to what had been hoped would have been a landmark moment for space exploration.

The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, named after the Hebrew for “in the beginning”, was a joint project between SpaceIL, a privately funded Israeli non-profit organisation, and Israel Aerospace Industries. It set off for the moon in late February but crashed on the lunar surface after the apparent failure of its main engine.

https://www.theweek.co.uk/100729/fi...letter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter
 

OneWingedBird

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OneWingedBird

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Hugely worth watching too, there's a crude video clip later on made up of images of the black hole taken over the period of a week and showing fluctuations in the accretion disk.

 
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