Bible Forbids Use Of Bathroom

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
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One does not look directly at the deity and live! Avert your eyes!
I'm actually thinking of starting my own religion now my job has gone down the Covid toilet.

I do believe in Christ, as some of you know. But I don't believe in the Holy Trinity (Ockham's razor) and I share with the Muslims that we cannot depict God as He is beyond human understanding. (and thus any attempt to depict him is blasphemous).

Having said which, I love Blake's painting of God creating the firmament. But what would a religion be if it didn't provide potential for debate among its adherents? They'd be forced to talk about the number of angels that fit on the head of a ... oh, sorry.
 

AgProv

Master of Uncertainty and Doubt
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Does God poo?
Well... He did assure Moses "Thou shalt see my back parts", so the wherewithal is presumably there - also that we are made in His image!
 

pandacracker

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But gradually the "father" in some manner superseded the mother, who was relegated to a secondary position, where she remains in most religions, including for example Mary. However women kept on having babies and bleeding, exhibiting the power, So in many cultures, best to get them out of the way for one or both of these events since they exhibit a threat to established power hierarchy. I didn't make this up - when I studied it many years ago, this was the long-held theory, and it does appear reasonable to me. I haven't read on the subject in many years and perhaps someone reading this can catch me up on new developments.
Not exactly new but Robert Graves, in the introduction to his versions of Greek myths and legends, goes into great detail about this.

His hypothesis is that the myths and legends explain how early societies went from being matriarchal to patriarchal. They're still in print, I recommend the unabridged version.
 

Lb8535

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Not exactly new but Robert Graves, in the introduction to his versions of Greek myths and legends, goes into great detail about this.

His hypothesis is that the myths and legends explain how early societies went from being matriarchal to patriarchal. They're still in print, I recommend the unabridged version.
Graves was only quoting established theory, although he went into more detail on what he considered the implications for poetry. He did not come at it from the point of view of scholarship, although he would have been huffy at this suggestion. He wrote a thick book The White Goddess on the subject, which is fun but speculative. Any origins of religion book will give the same info.
 

bugmum

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I have been known to take Robert Graves' Greek Myths or White Goddess on holiday with me, as they are densely written books that I cannot read in a single sitting, and also they make me look intellectual on planes. :p
 

escargot

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Yeah, the Scripture in question is Deuteronomy 23:12-13, which reads "You shall set off a place outside the camp, and when you go out to use it, you must carry a spade among your gear and dig a hole, have easement, and turn to cover the excrement".
Excellent idea, and not only for those days. If only people would do it today! By burying solid waste, it breaks down with bacterial action in the soil, enriching and fertilizing the ground. Unfortunately a lot of people in poor countries tend to leave their solid wastes on the surface, where it attracts flies and disease organisms.
Do I do it myself? Well, I live in a block of flats, & have no land, so it's not possible for me to practise what I preach. However, if I had a plot of land on which I had to grow my own food, then of course I would.

Bill Robinson
The problem here is that burying human waste in a place where crops are grown is likely to introduce parasites into the food chain.
I was taught about this at school and it's about the most disgusting subject you could imagine.
 
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