Boscastle Under Water (Including The Museum Of Witchcraft)

Rickkkkkkk

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MXhaunted said:
Austen,


I hope it’s still standing.

MX

Sorry to say that it isn't.

Much as I disagreed with the owners beliefs it must be shocking to watch from the other side of the torrent as cars/vans crash into your shop and completley demolish it.

Rick.
 
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Anonymous

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Boscastle Witchcraft Museum

Does anyone know if the Witchcraft Museum at Boscastle was consumed by the recent deluge?
 

Rickkkkkkk

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Originally posted by Dominic Brayne
[] appears to show that apart from the book collection, the whole of the contents of the Museum have gone - I assume this includes the witches skeleton and a huge collection of occult items.

Dominic,

Just to let you know that Joan (the witches skeleton) was buried a couple of years ago in a location near to Boscastle. I don't know as yet if that area has been damaged by the rain fall or not.

Rick.
 
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Anonymous

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eight inches of rain in 24 hours that day!.. its a wonder we all wernt washed away!..

chinook helicopters are dropping four big generators in the village today.
 
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Anonymous

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I've just come back from that part of the world. As for the museum, my mother is quite pleased as you believes that she was cursed by the skeleton of the witch that was in the museum on a previous visit when she took a photograph of her. She hopes that now the witch has been washed out to sea she will have some good luck......
 
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Anonymous

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the witch was reburied some time ago and not by a mud slide too!
 
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Anonymous

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Well, that just proves the limit of my mothers so-called psychic abilities :D..I shall have great delight telling her that.
 
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Anonymous

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http://www.museumofwitchcraft.com/displayrecord_mow.php?ObjectNumber=24

http://www.occultebooks.com/resources/interviews/grahamking.htm
When we took over the museum we inherited the skeleton of Joan Wytte, a witch who died in Bodmin Gaol in 1813. She had been on display here for many years, but we thought it was time that she was given a decent burial. We buried her quietly and respectfully in a beautiful spot in a local wood. We have recently placed a memorial stone near the burial site and it has become a local legend. We often find flowers left at the stone.
 

austen27

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It's a den of iniquity is Boscastle...

http://www.stillife.0catch.com/life_of_Christian_holinessdprayerdtintagel.htm
The town of Tintagel is literally drenched in New Age, pagan, satanic, and Celtic spirituality. It is everywhere; in every shop, in every store. During the course of our weeklong stay, my sister and I were also soon to find out that in the adjacent small town of Boscastle, no more than a few short miles down the road, resided the world's largest witchraft artifact and paraphernalia museum. The world's largest! Walking around the streets of Tintagel and visiting even but only a few of the shops, was after a few days, beginning to make us both nauseous.

Why this particular Christian ministry had decided upon setting up their weekly summer camp meeting in the heart of such an occultic area as this, is a question I still very much have. However, I figure their intentions were probably towards somehow exerting some kind of Godly influence upon a region which was obviously very much lacking of anything Christian. Still though, my sister and I were growing ill-accustomed to frequenting local shops where all that was on display were Celtic icons, pentagrams, and magic crystals. In fact, the whole scene sort of brought to mind reminiscings of that new movie Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone. Only as far as I am concerned, Harry's warlock adventures would appear but child's play standing in light of this pentagram-cluttered place. So anyway, as we were understandably tiring of this blatant pagan atmosphere, we decided for our last week in Tintagel simply to relax outside of town on the grassy, green pastures which overlooked the ocean... and in quiet, waiting prayer. And for over a week we did just that, and very little else. ...

...Anyway, it was on that very night that I had a certain very striking dream. And I feel that this dream sort of put the whole trip itself into proper perspective, for I see it is a display, or a picture, of the powerful effectiveness of consecrated Christian prayer. In this dream I viewed a very tall and extremely powerful looking witch who was fastening a sort of harness upon a nearby someone. Believing that I could perhaps possibly affect this situation that I was viewing in some way or another, I began rebuking the witch continuously in the name of Jesus. You know, something like: "In the name of Jesus, I rebuke thee!!". Something like that. When the witch then turned to me and realized full well what I was trying to accomplish against her, her previously relaxed expression soon turned into angry rage, her eyes becoming as small black holes; and then, stretching forth her claw-like hand, she fiercely grasped the extended hand with which I had been rebuking her. There was an ensuing fierce power struggle, she pushing one way and I another, but with no clear headway nor seeming advance made by either side. But then something broke - I don't know what, I don't know who! I woke up with a jolt, hand still clenched, and in a cold sweat.

To this day, I still cannot be certain as to what this dream actually signifies. However, I am inclined to believe it is a representation of the spiritual struggle which my sister and I were instigating as we waitingly prayed, days on end, in this occultic spiritual haven in western Cornwall, England. Perhaps in the heavenly sphere we were wrestling against the evil spiritual powers which held their grasp over that particular region. I don't know. One thing I am quite sure of, however, is that neither my sister nor I had at all intentionally planned on attending this conference in this very remote part of Great Britain.
 

agentbuffy

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Austen said:
I began rebuking the witch continuously in the name of Jesus. You know, something like: "In the name of Jesus, I rebuke thee!!". Something like that. When the witch then turned to me and realized full well what I was trying to accomplish against her, her previously relaxed expression soon turned into angry rage, her eyes becoming as small black holes; and then, stretching forth her claw-like hand, she fiercely grasped the extended hand with which I had been rebuking her.
And the author is surprised at this - I'd be pretty hacked off too if there I was, enjoying myself with a little light-hearted BDSM, and some bleeding God-botherer comes along and gets all preachy on me. Have a little decorum, I'm not pissing in your chips!

Isn't organised religion a wonderful thing :rolleyes:

(and yes, I know it was a dream, but the principle remains)

Cor, that sounds a bit narky - it started off meant to be light-hearted, and then turned into a bit of a rant. Sorry if anyone's offended, but I stand by everything I posted. And, FWIW, I'm not a practicing pagan, (or indeed Christian). I'd say my only religion is science :D.
 
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Anonymous

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Austen said:
The nightmare sequence with the witch (a 'Night Hag' and a half), does make me wonder if his sister is a bit of a bossy boots, or if she's entirely happy with her life as companion to a Christian contemplative?

What a curious Site, good find Austen:
The Stilllife.com: 'New Age' Culture

* Below is a lyrics line from radio's most popularly requested song of all time: Stairway to Heaven by Led Zeppelin. Scan over these two lines very closely:

"Yes there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run...
there's still time to change the road you're on."

These lyrics seem to suggest a freewill type approach to life, as well, and with the added assurance that in the end... it'll all work out. There'll always be plenty of time to change these words seem to be suggesting, so just do what you want in the meantime. Satanicly suggestive? Hardly, you might proclaim. Yes, but when these same lyrics are played backwards (and it's been well documented; I have heard it myself) the words below are what can be heard. And keep in mind that "doing it backwards" is really a call unto participation in New Age idealism, and of which I will later explain in much more detail:

"Here's to my sweet Satan...
Do it backwards like the Zep (as in Led Zeppelin), whose power is Satan.
He will give you, give you, 666."

As the very powerful, beautifully enchanting tune then progresses forward (I mean backward, I mean forward, I mean...) we later in the song find our ears nipped with this little afterthought backward message:

"... there's no escaping it."

Fact is, there is an escape from "I life" fuel, but we must first be relevantly aware of what to avoid, using wisdom and discretion, and then afterwards have the courage to deny our own fiesty self-inclinations in these otherwise trivial seeming matters. For this popular song, as with most New Age instruments of propaganda, is a wonderfully seductive and alluring medium
Anybody got a reversible turntable?
 
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Anonymous

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! Walking around the streets of Tintagel and visiting even but only a few of the shops, was after a few days, beginning to make us both nauseous.

Has that effect on me too, but that's just the incredible tackiness of the souvenirs and the place generally.

Excaliburgers in the Guinevere Lounge anyone?

this occultic spiritual haven in western Cornwall, England.

England? That'll go down well with the locals:D
Oh by the way, Western Cornwall is the bit at the lefthand side of the map. Boscastle/Tintagel are towards the righthand, or to give the technical term Eastern , edge.
Pillock.

Waitingly prayed? Can someone, anyone, tell me what this means?

Cornwall very remote? Well it is outside the M25 dahling!
 
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Anonymous

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The best bit of Tinatagel is the Arthurs Car park. Best do a U-turn there and drive virtuly anywhere else.
 
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Anonymous

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Rather a pointless post but I must have gone to Tintagel on a good day. About 13 years ago i arrived there on a very misty morning and somehow found myself walking up a little footpath which lead to a chapel sort of carved into the rocks and then when i walked a little further I could see from my vantage point a church so covered in mist around it's base that it looked like it was floating in mid air. I cannot describe how beautiful it was, everything cold and crisp and empty...thats the reason I have never gone back to the place because i want to keep that memory....if anybody knows the name of the chapel I would be grateful because sometimes i feel like i dreamt the whole thing.
 
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Anonymous

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Thats the church!! It has a cattle grid in front of it which i remember tripping over. The chapel carved into rock (and i hope I'm remembering it right now) was extremely small, with space for probably a dozen seats and I remember lighting a candle in there for departed souls, although i'm an atheist I always light a candle in churches don't ask me why, force of habit i guess.
 

mxhaunted

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Ummm… a few years ago I pottered down to see the church/chapel carved into the cliff face. Now I’ve probably got this totally wrong. What was the building on the cliff face, just behind the church?

*sigh* my memories of going there was standing on the cliff face looking over to America and wondering what was happening over there, so far away. When I had got back to the main village and popped into a pub to get something to eat. I realised at that moment the Twin Towers were being destroyed. :/

MX
 
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Anonymous

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What a poignant memory!!!

What I can remember is that the chapel is in the cliff face but to the side if you get my meaning, it doesn't face directly out to sea. It lies in front of the church and when you exit it the church lies to your left.
 
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Anonymous

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That must be it, it looks familiar although I would laid money on it not having a roof like that, many thanks :)
 

austen27

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Sort of relevant:

BBC RADIO 4
Sunday Best: Document

Sun 22 Aug, 13:30 - 14:00 30 mins

In the run up to a new series of the award winning investigative history series Document, Sunday Best revisits five notable programmes from previous years. Presented by Mike Thomson.

5/5. The Day They Made It Rain

On 15 August 1952, in the picturesque Devon village of Lynmouth, a devastating flood cost 34 lives. It rained so hard it didn't seem entirely natural and some said it wasn't.

Document looks at new evidence on the imprecise science of cloud seeding. It reveals who had secrets to keep an what the implications are now for us all.
Listen again (look for "Sunday Best")
 

SoundDust

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residents return


Residents are returning to the village of Boscastle in north Cornwall 10 days after flash floods caused millions of pounds of damage.
It is a major step in the process of rebuilding the community.

The security cordon at the centre of the village was lifted at midday by North Cornwall District Council.

The council's chief executive, David Brown, thanked the contractors, agencies and the people of the village before handing the village back.
 

Mal_Adjusted

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Hi

this from the Children of artemis newsletter received today (01/09/04):

Boscastle Witchcraft Museum Relief Fund.

We are pleased to announce that our generous web site visitors have donated
almost £3,500, which together with the £500 donated directly by CoA central
funds makes the amount raised £4,000. We are continuing to work with the Museum
to help in the reconstruction effort in any way we can, and to raise much needed
addtional money. It was volunteers from the http://www.witchcraft.org web site that
helped transport the books and documents to a temporary new home, to save them
from the very damp environment the musuem has now become. Work is only just
beginning to try to find artifacts lost in the flood, recent successes include
the recovery of Joan, the Witches Cottage dummy.

To help raise more money for the Museum we are starting two more ways of making
money for the fund. We have all the Museum of Witchcraft T-Shirts to survive the
flood, they were kindly donated by the Tshirt company "Wicked Teaze". They will
be on sale at http://www.witchcraft.org within the next few days, so keep checking back
to have the chance of buying one of these unique flood survivors. We will also
be having a charity auction on behalf of the Museum at Witchfest, with all money
raised going to the relief fund. The Museum owner and staff would like to
express their thanks to everyone who has contributed or helped them during this
crisis.

Bright Blessings

Merlyn
 

pixibelle

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I have just got back from our family holiday in Polzeath, Cornwall.
We discussed whether or not to visit boscastle with locals and being told 'yes! visit, it will be good for the local economy', we visited.
....... It was a pretty sad sight, road blocks, buliding works being carried out, not a person in sight. Unfortunately it looks like it is going to take a long time for the place to get back to normal.:sob:
 
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Anonymous

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Boscastle flood

I'm slightly amazed that I haven't seen anyone bring up any conspiracy theories concerning the Boscastle flood yet; however it may be that I've just been looking in the wrong place.

I have a friend who lives in Boscastle. On one of my visits to him last October he asked me if I thought it was possible that cloud-seeding was perhaps responsible for the excessive rainfall, as he and some others had noticed some unusual aircraft in the hills above Boscastle just a few hours before the floods swept through the Boscastle and the surrounding villages. I said I thought that was a bit far-fetched and it was just bad luck. After all, August 2004 was the wettest month on record for many regions of the UK. But North Cornwall was up to then having a particularly dry summer..

So is it so far-fetched?

In 2001, the BBC unearthed documents describing military cloud-seeding experiments in south-west England, and went on to broadcast a documentary programme on Radio 4 about it on August 30th, 2001. Earlier that day, an article appeared in The Guardian (here) detailing the Radio 4 broadcast, and giving some background information to it. In the 1950s cloud seeding was suspected by many of being responsible for the Lynmouth flood (which occurred almost exactly 52 years to the day - August 15th 1952 - of the Boscastle floods of August 16th 2004).

The military long-since gave up on cloud-seeding as a potential weapon of attack or defence, and with greatly improved technology it is now common in civilian use, eg agriculture, in many countries all over the world.

So the programme-makers at the BBC were aware not only that cloud-seeding was possible, but also that it worked, and that the technology has now significantly improved since the early days of the 1950s.

But last summer, the BBC had a location crew in Boscastle, filming the second series of their docu-soap "A Seaside Parish", following the life and times of the vicar and villagers of Boscastle. They also had another one just 40 miles or so down the road, in Newquay, filming a brand new series "Seaside Rescue", following the daily life of the Cornwall coastguard, and Poole, Dorset, at the base of one the coastguard helicopters ("Whisky Bravo") subsequently drafted in to Boscastle to winch out trapped people.

The occurence of such a major event right under the noses of these film crews must have been a complete godsend to the BBC, and has drastically improved the viewing ratings for these two programmes alone. They were also able to make at least two one-hour documentaries from the footage obtained, which were not only shown to UK viewers but have been sold world-wide.
 

Mal_Adjusted

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MUSEUM OF WITCHCRAFT REOPENS AFTER BOSCASTLE FLOOD

greets

MUSEUM OF WITCHCRAFT REOPENS AFTER BOSCASTLE FLOOD CLEAR UP
By David Prudames 22/03/2005
Shows a photograph of the damaged door to the Museum of Witchcraft in Boscastle.

The Museum of Witchcraft was among the many buildings in Boscastle to be severely damaged by last year's flood. Photo: John Hooper.

Back in August 2004 when floods ripped through the Cornish coastal village of Boscastle it was much to the nation’s relief that no lives were lost.

Yet the cost to the village’s residents was great, as houses, businesses and cars were washed away. Among the casualties that seemed to have been destroyed was Boscastle’s famous Museum of Witchcraft.

However, despite severe damage and following a massive clean up operation, staff at the world’s largest collection of witchcraft-related artefacts plan to reopen the doors to the public on Friday March 25, 2005.

Incredibly no lives were lost as flash floods swept through the village. Photo: John Hooper.
Shows a photograph of a car being swept through a street in Boscastle by flood water.

"It’s a miracle" enthused owner Graham King. "At first the museum looked like a disaster zone with display cases smashed by the force of the water. Internal walls were demolished and doors had been ripped of their hinges."

Housing the world’s largest collection of artefacts and regalia associated with witchcraft, the museum has been welcoming visitors to its Boscastle premises since 1960 and aims to offer an impartial overview of this controversial subject.

Following the devastation of August 16 it looked as if the institution and its vast collection might be lost.
Shows a photograph of a waxwork model of a witch sitting behind a table.

Joan, one of thousands of museum objects to have been recovered after the flood. Photo: John Hooper.

But despite the damage, thousands of irreplaceable artefacts were salvaged including resident waxwork witch Joan. Firemen entering the building right after the flood had a bit of a fright when they came across her lying in mud.

With the help of the museum team and scores of volunteers Graham King has worked tirelessly ever since to rid the museum of hundreds of tons of sewage, mud and silt.

After the great clean up local builders, carpenters and electricians were employed and building work to reconstruct the home of this unique collection began. Now it seems the work is finally complete and the museum is ready to reopen.

Museum owner Graham King's quick reactions have been honoured with the Chief Coastguards' Commendation. Photo: John Hooper.
Shows a photograph of a coastguard helicopter above houses in Boscastle.

For Graham King, there is double cause for celebration this week: it was announced on March 21 that following his quick reactions on the day of the flood he will be honoured with the Chief Coastguards’ Commendation.

A volunteer with the Boscastle Coastguard rescue team, Graham was in the village on August 16 as a freak summer storm caused flooding. Noticing it worsen he immediately alerted the Coastguard Rescue Coordination Centre in Falmouth.

Military helicopters were scrambled to the scene ensuring that no lives were lost as around 80 people were airlifted to safety, despite an eight metre high (nine feet) wall of water crashing through the village.

The Museum of Witchcraft


The Harbour, Boscastle, PL35 0HD, Cornwall, England
T: 01840 250 111
Open: April-October Mon-Sat 1030-1800 Sun 1130-1800 Out of season visits can sometimes be made by appointment

http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/nwh_gfx_en/ART27082.html

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