• Please be advised there is a potential issue with DD collections, which may result in an excessive amount being taken. Please read the stickied thread in Fortean Times Magazine > General Discussion, Subs etc

Dzoonokwa

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
11,532
While reading a BBC History Magazine article about the American Civil War by David Sanger, l noted a mention by him of a mythical wild woman of the US woods. He refers to her as Dzoonokwa.

A quick Google brings up a short Wikipedia article referring to her as Dzunukwa; also Tsonoqua, Tsonokwa and Basket Ogress.

“She is venerated as a bringer of wealth, but is also greatly feared by children, because she is also known as an ogress who steals children and carries them home in her basket to eat.

Her appearance is that of a naked, black in colour, old monster with long pendulous breasts. She is also described as having bedraggled hair. In masks and totem pole images she is shown with bright red pursed lips because she is said to give off the call "Hu!" It is often told to children that the sound of the wind blowing through the cedar trees is actually the call of Dzunuḵ̓wa.”

A cryptid of which l haven’t previously heard.

maximus otter
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
29,623
Location
Out of Bounds
While reading a BBC History Magazine article about the American Civil War by David Sanger, l noted a mention by him of a mythical wild woman of the US woods. He refers to her as Dzoonokwa. ...

The source where you encountered the story is as strange as the legendary figure. Dzoonokwa (etc.) is a folk legend of the Kwakwaka'wakw culture in coastal British Columbia. I can't figure out why a legend from BC would be mentioned in an article about the American Civil War.

In any case, here's an online summary of the legend ...

Legend of the Dzunuḵ̓wa
https://www.wildwomanofthewoods.ca/pages/legend-of-the-dzunuḵ̓wa
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
11,532
I can't figure out why a legend from BC would be mentioned in an article about the American Civil War.

“While researching my novel - [All Their Minds in Tandem] - I stumbled across a fable about a strange female giant named Dzoonokwa. She would sometimes be portrayed as helpful and kindly, offering gifts to people who crossed her path in the woods. Yet the majority of fictions surrounding her make her out to be a ghastly monster – her face depicted in a grotesque purse of the lips with wild, knotted hair. Even darker, it was said she killed children and encouraged war.

While the tale is not explicitly linked to the Civil War, America was a melting pot of superstition in the 19th century with German, Irish, African and Native American folklores all brought together and interweaving. Superstition and folklore rose to the surface of many soldiers’ minds as life began to hang ever more precariously in the balance.”

https://www.historyextra.com/period...nked-when-start-end-battles-sides-casualties/

maximus otter
 
Top