Extinct? Missing? Not So Much (Rediscovered Animal Species; MIA Or Believed Extinct)

Jim

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Giant otters are great, i saw some when i stayed in the Peruvian rainforest
I've seen some very large river otters at the opposite hemisphere northern Canada. The North American river otter is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to the North America found in and along its rivers and coasts. An adult North American river otter can weigh between (11.0 and 31 lb). The river otter is protected and insulated by a thick, water-repellent coat of fur.
 

Nosmo King

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A species of Galapogos tortoise is not extinct, as previously thought.

"Genetic tests have confirmed that a giant tortoise found on the Galápagos Islands is from a species which scientists thought had died out more than a century ago.

The single female was discovered during a 2019 expedition to Fernandina Island.

To prove the link, scientists took samples from the female to compare to the remains of a male from the species Chelonoidis phantasticus.

The last previous sighting of the species had been in 1906."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-57253471
 

maximus otter

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Gould's mouse was declared extinct, but DNA shows it still lives on an island in Shark Bay, Western Australia


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Before European settlers set foot on Australian shores, Gould's mouse scurried about the continent.

But land clearing and the introduction of predators decimated native rodent populations, and the little mouse was declared extinct more than a century ago – until now.

A team of researchers, led by Emily Roycroft of the Australian National University, looked at genomes of Australia's extinct and living rodents.

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DNA collected from this Gould's mouse specimen revealed that the species should no longer be considered extinct.
Supplied: C.Ching, Courtesy of the Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London


Their analysis shows a small population of Gould's mouse (Pseudomys gouldii) lives on an island off the coast of Western Australia.

But this little animal with shaggy fur and large black eyes is known by another name. Gould's mouse is actually the same species as the Shark Bay mouse (Pseudomys fieldi).

Because the species is listed as endangered, it's important to make it a conservation priority, said Euan Ritchie, a wildlife ecologist.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2021-06-29/extinct-goulds-mouse-alive-shark-bay-wa/100244862

maximus otter
 

CALGACUS03

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'Comical-looking' bat thought to be extinct is found again after 40 years​

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A 'comical-looking' critically endangered bat not seen in 40 years and feared extinct has been found in Rwanda.

Two Hill's horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hilli), which haven't been seen since 1981, were found by scientists in the forest at the Nyungwe National Park in Nyungwe.
From msn.com here.
 

Mythopoeika

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https://www.theguardian.com/environ...-tortoise-species-thought-extinct-found-alive

‘Fantastic giant tortoise’ species thought extinct for 100 years found alive
Identification of Galápagos tortoise celebrated by scientists as a big deal for island’s biodiversity


A rare Galápagos species, the “fantastic giant tortoise”, long thought extinct, has been officially identified for the first time in more than a century in what scientists called a “big deal” for the famed islands’ embattled biodiversity.

The animal is the first Chelonoidis phantasticus to be seen since a male specimen was discovered by the explorer Rollo Beck during an expedition in 1906. The newcomer has been named Fernanda, after the Fernandina Island, a largely unexplored active volcano in the western Galápagos Archipelago that she calls home.

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CALGACUS03

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Despite the headline I'm not sure that this is suitable for this thread; it's more about the reintroduction from captivity of a species believed extinct in the wild. But anyway, from The Guardian here:

‘Extinct’ parrots make a flying comeback in Brazil​

The Spix macaw, a bird that had once vanished in the wild, is now thriving in its South American homeland after a successful breeding programme
Now, if only they could do the same for the Glaucous Macaw.

ETA: regarding the above mentioned Glaucous Macaw:
A 2018 study citing bird extinction patterns, the heavy destruction of its habitat, and the lack of any confirmed sightings since the 1980s recommended uplisting the species to Critically Endangered - Possibly Extinct.[7]
 
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EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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The Shelta Cave Crayfish has been re-discovered in its sole known habitat after being presumed extinct for the last 30 years.
Rare Crustacean, Thought To Be Extinct, Found in a 2500-Foot-Long Cave

... A team led by an assistant professor at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has uncovered a small, rare crayfish that was believed to have been extinct for 30 years in a cave in the City of Huntsville in northern Alabama. ...

The Shelta Cave Crayfish, scientifically known as Orconectes sheltae, was discovered by Dr. Matthew L. Niemiller’s team during 2019 and 2020 trips into Shelta Cave, its sole habitat.

A study on the discoveries was published in the journal Subterranean Biology. ...

A 2,500-foot cave system that is owned and maintained by the National Speleological Society (NSS) is the crayfish’s home. It is discretely tucked under the NSS’s national headquarters in northwest Huntsville, and it is surrounded by busy roads. ...

“Interestingly, the crayfish has been known to cave biologists since the early 1960s but was not formally described until 1997 by the late Dr. John Cooper and his wife Martha.”

Dr. Cooper, a biologist and speleologist ... , studied the aquatic life in Shelta Cave with a particular focus on crayfish for his dissertation work in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Shelta Cave’s aquatic ecosystem was particularly diverse then, with at least 12 cave-dependent species documented, including three species of cave crayfishes.

“No other cave system to date in the U.S. has more documented cave crayfishes co-occurring with each other,” Dr. Niemiller says.

But the aquatic ecosystem, including the Shelta Cave Crayfish, crashed sometime in the early 1970s. The crash may be related to a gate that was built to keep people out of the cave and yet still allows a grey bat maternity population to move freely in and out.

“The initial design of the gate was not bat-friendly, and the bats ultimately vacated the cave system,” Dr. Niemiller says. “Coupled with groundwater pollution and perhaps other stressors, that all may have led to a perfect storm resulting in the collapse of the aquatic cave ecosystem.” ...
FULL STORY: https://scitechdaily.com/rare-crustacean-thought-to-be-extinct-found-in-a-2500-foot-long-cave/
 

Mythopoeika

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