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Irish Archaeological Finds & Theories

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
11,564

Research finds mysterious structure in Cork Harbour is prehistoric tomb


New research looks set to answer a long-standing question about the status of a mysterious tomb-like structure uncovered in Cork Harbour many years ago.

Archaeologists have been split as to whether it was prehistoric or a more recent 19th-century “folly”.

However, Connemara-based archaeologist Michael Gibbons now says there is conclusive evidence the Carraig á Mhaistin stone structure at Rostellan on the eastern shore of Cork Harbour is a megalithic dolmen.

3248639_5_articleinline_The_20Rostellan_20dolmen_20with_20a_2025_20metre_20cairn_20extending_20from_20it_20below_20the_20estuary_20surface_20_Michael_20Gibbons_1_.jpg


Mr Gibbons has also discovered a previously unrecognised cairn close to the dolmen.

He says doubt about Carraig á Mhaistin’s age meant it was not included in the State’s survey of megalithic tombs of Ireland conducted by Professor Ruaidhrí de Valera and Seán Ó Nualláin over 40 years ago.

“At that time, it was suggested that it could have a folly or type of ornamental structure commissioned by local gentry at the nearby Rostellan Castle estate, and dating from the 19th century,” Mr Gibbons says.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40986065.html

maximus otter
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
55,183
Location
Eblana

Research finds mysterious structure in Cork Harbour is prehistoric tomb


New research looks set to answer a long-standing question about the status of a mysterious tomb-like structure uncovered in Cork Harbour many years ago.

Archaeologists have been split as to whether it was prehistoric or a more recent 19th-century “folly”.

However, Connemara-based archaeologist Michael Gibbons now says there is conclusive evidence the Carraig á Mhaistin stone structure at Rostellan on the eastern shore of Cork Harbour is a megalithic dolmen.

3248639_5_articleinline_The_20Rostellan_20dolmen_20with_20a_2025_20metre_20cairn_20extending_20from_20it_20below_20the_20estuary_20surface_20_Michael_20Gibbons_1_.jpg


Mr Gibbons has also discovered a previously unrecognised cairn close to the dolmen.

He says doubt about Carraig á Mhaistin’s age meant it was not included in the State’s survey of megalithic tombs of Ireland conducted by Professor Ruaidhrí de Valera and Seán Ó Nualláin over 40 years ago.

“At that time, it was suggested that it could have a folly or type of ornamental structure commissioned by local gentry at the nearby Rostellan Castle estate, and dating from the 19th century,” Mr Gibbons says.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40986065.html

maximus otter

A folly to think that it was a folly.
 

staticgirl

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Oct 12, 2003
Messages
876
I wish my grandad was still here so I could tell him about this. He'd have been so interested. He loved reading about the history of his home city. That's a great find/identification.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
11,564

Tree planting in North Sligo unearthed 6,000 year old tools


Two Sligo archaeologists who were doing some gardening on a mountain side unearthed 6,000 year old stone tools.

Archaeologists Marion Dowd and James Bonsall were planting trees in a garden on Cope’s Mountain in north Sligo during one of the Covid lockdowns of 2021 when they began discovering prehistoric artefacts in the topsoil.

oto%20James%20Connolly


These items were in a disturbed context and had originated from an archaeological site presumably in the wider environs.

Overall, Marion and James recovered 22 stone (lithic) tools made from a rock type known as chert. They were sent for analysis to lithic specialist Cian Hogan.

Cian identified in the assemblage two Late Mesolithic forms, which date to 5500-4000 BC.

Several convex scrapers, flakes and retouched pieces were also recovered. These could date to any time from the Late Mesolithic through to the Neolithic and Bronze Age (5500-700 BC).

https://www.independent.ie/regional...o-unearthed-6000-year-old-tools-42195996.html

maximus otter
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
55,183
Location
Eblana
I wonder if there were disagreements regarding the name for the settlement back then?

The discovery of a Neolithic era settlement is helping shed new light on how people lived on the shores of Lough Foyle some 5,000 years ago.

Archaeologists uncovered evidence of two large rectangular houses dating back to around 3,800BC during a 2021 dig at Clooney Road, Londonderry. Neolithic tools, pottery and cooking utensils have also been unearthed.

Experts say that dwellings like those found in Derry have rarely been excavated before. Archaeologist Katy McMonagle was the site director on the Clooney Road dig. The finds feature in the latest series of BBC Two's Digging for Britain.

Rectangular homes from the period are seldom found outside of Scotland and Ireland, Ms McMonagle said.

"Around Lough Foyle specifically there are quite a few - it has a high density of settlement dated to the early Neolithic - that shows around Lough Foyle there are lots and lots of Neolithic people living," she told BBC Radio Foyle's Mark Patterson Show.

Archaeologists seldom have an opportunity to excavate houses of the type found in Derry, she added.

"They were a short-lived phenomenon, that means it is even more exciting," she said. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-64505669
 
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