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Medbeds

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
7,344
Magical healing beds claimed to cure anything. The "Tesla BioHealing" bed is only one of many, with others selling "virtual medbeds" that will turn any bed into a "medbed" via "quantum entanglements".

Also Qanon is involved and JFK Jr is alive and well thanks to medbeds, of course.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/n...lves-a-magical-bed-for-zombie-jfk/ar-AAWtGRQ?

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Tesla BioHealing doesn’t claim that its “medbed generators” can regrow missing body parts—and its med beds are not even beds, but metal canisters designed to be placed under a mattress. Nevertheless, the Delaware-based company recommends its products for a spectrum of conditions, ranging from “mild” (including asthma and autism) to “severe” (including “terminal cancers”).

Reached for comment about Tesla BioHealing’s benefits for people with “severe” conditions, CEO James Liu told The Daily Beast that the devices delivered “life force energy” to those patients.

“Tesla BioHealing products provide life force energy to the user. When anyone with an unmet severe condition, such as ‘terminal cancers’ and ‘stroke-paralysis’ for 6 months, they do not have much life force energy, and it is hard for them to get better,” Liu told The Daily Beast via email. He cited studies, which Tesla BioHealing has not yet published.
 
I don’t know, but singer Michael Jackson slept in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber thinking he would live forever.

As we know Michael didn’t !
 
Mississippi Medbeds.

Strange corners of the internet are awash with chatter about miracle devices that can cure nearly any ailment you can think of using the power of mystical energy. Some companies charge thousands for these "medbeds" - but their claims are far from proven.

A converted motel in a small town on the Mississippi River seems an unlikely home for a world-changing technology - what a flyer in the mostly deserted lobby calls a "new wave of scientific healing". But since last summer, this building in East Dubuque, Illinois - three hours west of Chicago - has been outfitted with medical devices that supposedly imbue patients with "life force energy". It's one of a number of locations run by Tesla BioHealing - no relation to the car company - dotted around the US.

I tried out a medbed on a recent gloomy weekday afternoon. After being greeted at the front desk, a doctor tested my energy levels by having me place my fingers inside a metal box. Then I was ushered into one of the rooms, mostly unchanged from its motel days, and I waited for "pure biophoton life-force energy" to stream into my body.

The idea of medbeds - short either for "medical beds" or "meditation beds" - has become increasingly popular on fringe medical channels, on mainstream social networks and chat apps.

But people have very different ideas about what they actually are. Some insist that the technology is secret, unlikely to be encountered by mere mortals, hidden from the public by billionaires and the "deep state". The more conspiratorial theorising includes speculation about "alien technology" and bizarre claims like the idea that John F Kennedy is still alive, strapped to a medbed. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-64070190
 
Magical healing beds claimed to cure anything. The "Tesla BioHealing" bed is only one of many,...

Have they got any justification for using Tesla's name in this way? Presumably, there are no descendants to object, but it's still a pretty crappy thing to do.
 
Mississippi Medbeds.

Strange corners of the internet are awash with chatter about miracle devices that can cure nearly any ailment you can think of using the power of mystical energy. Some companies charge thousands for these "medbeds" - but their claims are far from proven.

A converted motel in a small town on the Mississippi River seems an unlikely home for a world-changing technology - what a flyer in the mostly deserted lobby calls a "new wave of scientific healing". But since last summer, this building in East Dubuque, Illinois - three hours west of Chicago - has been outfitted with medical devices that supposedly imbue patients with "life force energy". It's one of a number of locations run by Tesla BioHealing - no relation to the car company - dotted around the US.

I tried out a medbed on a recent gloomy weekday afternoon. After being greeted at the front desk, a doctor tested my energy levels by having me place my fingers inside a metal box. Then I was ushered into one of the rooms, mostly unchanged from its motel days, and I waited for "pure biophoton life-force energy" to stream into my body.

The idea of medbeds - short either for "medical beds" or "meditation beds" - has become increasingly popular on fringe medical channels, on mainstream social networks and chat apps.

But people have very different ideas about what they actually are. Some insist that the technology is secret, unlikely to be encountered by mere mortals, hidden from the public by billionaires and the "deep state". The more conspiratorial theorising includes speculation about "alien technology" and bizarre claims like the idea that John F Kennedy is still alive, strapped to a medbed. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-64070190

It was a scam in 1781 when “Dr.” James Graham rented out his Celestial Bed for £50 per night, it’s a scam now.

maximus otter
 
It was a scam in 1781 when “Dr.” James Graham rented out his Celestial Bed for £50 per night, it’s a scam now.

maximus otter

To give an idea of how good a doctor he was:
At the end of 1792, Graham began to experiment with extended fasting to prolong his life. He died at his home in Edinburgh in 1794.
 
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