Medical Mishaps & Daffy Doctors

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Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
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If this is in Scotland I can maybe be of help going through the reporting system? You may have already got it in hand of course!
 

Mythopoeika

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Lots of horror stories. I have my own.

I was in hospital for 2 months over the winter. This because I hit rock bottom in my personal life and ended up starving i.e. not eating anything, for 5 weeks. In the end I called emergency services and was admitted to hospital Of course, I had lost a lot of weight after starving for 5 weeks. I was also malnourished and exhibited various symptoms typical of the condition and was therefore put on a fortified diet i.e. richer food than normal, and encouraged to eat lots of snacks in-between meals. For the first 10 days I was in the big regional hospital before being transferred to a cottage hospital.

While in the big hospital I took to hoarding food, this because in the general mayhem that is hospital, I was never sure of getting my main meals. So, a patient in hospital due to starvation and malnourishment is reduced to hoarding food???!!!!! That wasn't the worst of it. As I was eating my main meal one evening, a nurse came in and whipped away my plates even though I had not finished eating. I was left with just my cup of tea and a biscuit. The mid-evening tea/coffee trolley did not appear that night either. This, another nurse told me later, because the staff who managed the trolley had decided to leave work early to go to the pub. This nurse led me to understand that this was normal weekend behaviour. There were few managers if any on duty at weekends and so it was a case of "while the cat is away, the mice will play". I used up some of my hoarded food that night.


During my 7 weeks in the cottage hospital, one of the nurses, out of pure spite, surreptitiously and anonymously tampered with my menu choices which resulted on my being put on minimum rations for a week . By "minimum rations", I mean I was put onto the smallest portions of food possible. I was not allowed any "extras" e.g. the side-salad that I ordered with hot meals. By mid-week I was starting to feel hungry. Eventually I asked a nurse why I was being denied my food. No answer was forthcoming. However, next day my normal diet i.e. the diet I ordered from the menus, as well as the requested size of portion, was quietly reinstated. So, a patient in hospital suffering malnutrition was put on minimum diet???!!! This despite the dietician telling me to eat lots of food and in big portions?


On several occasions during my stay in the cottage hospital, serious accidents to other patients were averted by myself and another patient, as well as by a visitor. In my ward there were some very elderly women with brittle, easily broken bones. On 3 occasions one woman started falling off her chair. She would have suffered serious injury had not I and another patient, I in my crutches and the other walking with a zimmer, not gone to the rescue. We caught and held the patient who was teetering on the brink of falling under her arms and yelled for a third patient to call a nurse. On the fourth occasion, it was a hospital visitor who saved another woman from serious injury by falling. I was only in that hospital for 7 weeks. There was more than one ward in the hospital. How many other near accidents happened in the other wards that I did not know about? How many such accidents there regularly are, I do not know. But based on my experience, I can only speculate that there must be many accidents or near accidents.

Nurses were also always getting my daily pills wrong. I had to be very careful that they didn't give me e.g. the wrong pills or not enough of the right pills (vitamin supplements mostly). One of the patients had been offered anti-biotics for an infection. She refused to take them, saying she was allergic to antibiotics. Despite her refusal, the nurses tried to slip her these pills along with her usual pills. That treatment made the patient very angry and anxious. The nurses tried to slip the antibiotics past her for about a week. Luckily, due to the patient's vigilance, the nurses eventually got the message and stopped trying to trick her into taking the antibiotics.


I can provide many other horror stories about my stay in hospital. That experience was a real eye-opener. I consider myself lucky to have survived it.
Shocking treatment, which shows that the NHS has undergone a serious decline.
You really should put in a complaint.
 

hunck

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You should definitely report this to the NHS board running the hospitals. Itemise every element of fuckery in a numbered list & name the nurses involved.
 
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If this is in Scotland I can maybe be of help going through the reporting system? You may have already got it in hand of course!

I do live in Scotland. I thank you for the offer of help. However, I do not wish to make a complaint. One reason is that I do not want to become involved in a long legal wrangle. I do not think that would be productive. It would also take up more energy than I have right now.

What I found out is that the NHS is no different to any other organisation, all are equally bad and getting worse. I used to be a teacher and in the NHS I saw the same symptoms of decline as I have seen in teaching as well as in many other walks of life. So instead of formally complaining, I think that writing about my experiences such as in forums is more useful. I am also writing about my hospital experiences as part of a larger piece of writing that I hope sometime to get published.


As I said, the experience of hospital was a real eye opener. For example, I had thought to feel secure, to feel looked after, in hospital. Not a bit of it.


In the big hospital wards comprised individual patient rooms. The resulting isolation made one feel very, very vulnerable, as did the frequent upheaval of being moved to a new ward every couple of days. Also, the individual rooms had a windowed corridor-wall where anyone wandering the corridors could look in and see the patient. (At times I did feel a bit like a zoo animal when there were lots of visitors around.) That was mostly ok since I needed to be able to see the comings and goings to feel less isolated. However, on one occasion, being too weak to clean myself properly after enduring a particularly lengthy and unpleasant session on the toilet, I returned, exhausted, to my bed. My clothing and person were soiled and not wanting to soil my bed as well, I lay on my bed face down. There I waited until I could get some strength back to reach for the bell and call a nurse. I had on a pair of hospital net knickers and an open-at-the-back hospital gown which must have been open for suddenly a nurse barged into the room. She had seen me from the corridor. Far from asking me if anything was wrong, she angrily accused me of exposing myself. She made me feel as if I had done something wrong, as if I was a pervert or something. When I told her that I was too exhausted and weak to clean myself she did clean me up. Yet despite my explanation, she showed me no sympathy. She didn’t make a very good job of cleaning me up either, for when I got some strength back I had to go into the bathroom and clean up again - as well as I was able, that is.


The cottage hospital especially had no provision for patients without (a) money and (b) next of kin. For example, since I had no next of kin to visit me, I had no one to do my laundry. I had to wash my own clothes, in secret, and surreptitiously dry them over radiators etc. (I did not want to risk drawing the nurses’ attention to my laundry – they could be very hostile – hence my secrecy.) If any nurse did realise that I was having to do my own laundry, then s/he never let on. Yet surely they must have known since I had no visitors. Even though the hospital had a washing machine and tumbler drier, I was never offered the use of them. Also, unlike the big hospital, the cottage hospital did not provide patients with essentials like toothpaste and toothbrush. I had no money to buy any. Even if I did have money, there was no one I could ask to buy me toiletries. I ran out of toothpaste 2 days before discharge, and that after eking out my supply to make it last as long as possible.


Water was another contentious issue. I, and the other patients, had tremendous difficulty getting the nurses to supply us with water. In the end, myself and another patient went to the water cooler to get our own. We even got water for other some of the other patients.
 
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Shocking treatment, which shows that the NHS has undergone a serious decline.
You really should put in a complaint.
As I remarked in an earlier reply to someone else:


One reason is that I do not want to become involved in a long legal wrangle. I do not think that would be productive. It would also take up more energy than I have right now.



What I found out is that the NHS is no different to any other organisation, all are equally bad and getting worse. I used to be a teacher and in the NHS I saw the same symptoms of decline as I have seen in teaching as well as in many other walks of life. So instead of formally complaining, I think that writing about my experiences such as in forums is more useful. I am also writing about my hospital experiences as part of a larger piece of writing that I hope sometime to get published.
 
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You should definitely report this to the NHS board running the hospitals. Itemise every element of fuckery in a numbered list & name the nurses involved.

As I said in an earlier post, I saw in the NHS the same decline as I saw in my nearly 3 decades in schools (I was formerly a secondary school teacher.)


For example, although I found the nurses to be bullies and to be mostly very hostile, I also saw that they were very, very angry. This, in part, because of their working conditions. They have to work really long shifts (I was appalled to discover they worked 12 hour shifts) under very difficult circumstances i.e their employers are every bit as bad as mine were. For example, as one nurse remarked, she had vast amounts of paperwork to complete. And it was, of course, true. Every time she did something for a patient it had to be written up. Also, the cottage hospital was an old building not big enough to accommodate modern hospital equipment. There was inadequate accommodation all round which just made everybody’s life difficult – patients, nurses and auxiliary staff alike. In addition, my stay in hospital made me realise what a difficult job nursing is, far more difficult I think than the job of a doctor, and yet of much lower status. Nurses are underpaid as well, of course.


So for those reasons alone, I would not want to name names. Actually, I think it is those in power, the bosses, who are to blame rather than any nurses.
 

Shady

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Jesus H christ, that sounds bloody aweful littlebrowndragon, I have recently got out of hospital and had nothing but wonderful care, doctors and nurses have been patient and caring, the food and the kitchen people have been wonderful, i could not ask for better care and understanding, i seriously could not praise them enough

Always double-check the identity of the patient before undertaking the procedure ...

FULL STORY: https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/24/asia/korea-wrong-abortion-intl-hnk-scli/index.html
I know this is going to sound aweful, but i have to ask it anyway, do you think they will offer this lady the child of the woman who was supposed to have the abortion?
 

escargot

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Jesus H christ, that sounds bloody aweful littlebrowndragon, I have recently got out of hospital and had nothing but wonderful care, doctors and nurses have been patient and caring, the food and the kitchen people have been wonderful, i could not ask for better care and understanding, i seriously could not praise them enough

I know this is going to sound aweful, but i have to ask it anyway, do you think they will offer this lady the child of the woman who was supposed to have the abortion?
The patient who was supposed to have the abortion has most likely had it by now. Unless she knew what had happened and decided God had spared her child or whatever and changed her mind.
 

EnolaGaia

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... I know this is going to sound aweful, but i have to ask it anyway, do you think they will offer this lady the child of the woman who was supposed to have the abortion?
As an automatic gesture to resolve the f**k-up: No - I strongly doubt there's any legal basis motivating such a thing.
As a discretionary transaction on a personal basis: It's conceivable, but it's up to the two women whose lives have been disrupted by this.
 

GNC

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Jesus H christ, that sounds bloody aweful littlebrowndragon, I have recently got out of hospital and had nothing but wonderful care, doctors and nurses have been patient and caring, the food and the kitchen people have been wonderful, i could not ask for better care and understanding, i seriously could not praise them enough
Considering it was a Scottish hospital, she's lucky to have gotten out without contracting a serious infection. Seriously, though, the NHS up here seems to be in even more of a crisis than down South (which is saying something), my family members can tell some stories too, but nothing as awful as @littlebrowndragon 's tale of woe. I wish I could offer constructive advice, but I got nuthin'.
 

Shady

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I was in Nottinghamshire.
But her experience is horrifying, they cannot possibly be all the same in Scotland, please tell me they are not
 

FelixAntonius

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I know someone who is a third generation midwife, who returned to duty recently after a year out.

She delivered her first baby after her return & told the mother that it was a boy.

She felt the room freeze & was ordered outside, to be told that you no longer tell the mother the sex of the child, just that it’s “a baby” & she was told that she obviously needs further training!!!!!

She is being sent on a further training course...........
 

Shady

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WTF, training course, just to say, do not say that again,what if the mother asks? obviously tell her, end of training, that will be £50
 

FelixAntonius

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WTF, training course, just to say, do not say that again,what if the mother asks? obviously tell her, end of training, that will be £50
I couldn't agree with you more.

The general feeling as the sad tale was told, was that the new mother would shout out:- "Of course I know its a F***ing" baby..... What the F*** do you think you've been delivering these last several hours."
 

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Considering it was a Scottish hospital, she's lucky to have gotten out without contracting a serious infection. Seriously, though, the NHS up here seems to be in even more of a crisis than down South (which is saying something), my family members can tell some stories too, but nothing as awful as @littlebrowndragon 's tale of woe. I wish I could offer constructive advice, but I got nuthin'.
I have a lot to do with the NHS Scotland for various reasons, not all my own! I also have a lot to do with NHS England - all my family down there are of an age where they are using the NHS more and more.

I've seen problems about equally in both countries. I'd categorise them as the result of chronic money shortages and some individiual situations - a demoralised team for example, crap designs decisions at a hospital for another one.

Comparing the two? The morale north of the border is higher and staff in all roles are trained more. As I understand it (from figures quoted verbally at a meeting with NHSGGC link to the general website the net flow of staff from within the UK is northwards and is increasing from where it was 20 years ago.

It's pertinent data but I don't know how far it can be generalised, although NHSGGC is the largest in the UK.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I have a lot to do with the NHS Scotland for various reasons, not all my own! I also have a lot to do with NHS England - all my family down there are of an age where they are using the NHS more and more.

I've seen problems about equally in both countries. I'd categorise them as the result of chronic money shortages and some individiual situations - a demoralised team for example, crap designs decisions at a hospital for another one.

Comparing the two? The morale north of the border is higher and staff in all roles are trained more. As I understand it (from figures quoted verbally at a meeting with NHSGGC link to the general website the net flow of staff from within the UK is northwards and is increasing from where it was 20 years ago.

It's pertinent data but I don't know how far it can be generalised, although NHSGGC is the largest in the UK.
Scottish nurses are brilliant.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I know someone who is a third generation midwife, who returned to duty recently after a year out.

She delivered her first baby after her return & told the mother that it was a boy.

She felt the room freeze & was ordered outside, to be told that you no longer tell the mother the sex of the child, just that it’s “a baby” & she was told that she obviously needs further training!!!!!

She is being sent on a further training course...........
Just checked this with MrsCarlos, who is a Senior Midwifery Lecturer - this is almost true.

You're OK to say the sex of the baby, but not the gender. "The baby is male" rather than "It's a boy". Sex is a biological, gender is emotional.

However, this rule could depend on the hospital!
 
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Just checked this with MrsCarlos, who is a Senior Midwifery Lecturer - this is almost true.

You're OK to say the sex of the baby, but not the gender. "The baby is male" rather than "It's a boy". Sex is a biological, gender is emotional.

However, this rule could depend on the hospital!
Sounds insane to me.

Harassing medical staff to cater to the whims of a tiny minority. Only rightwing parties will gain from this.
 

PeteS

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I can't be too critical of the NHS since they have saved my sorry a**e from flying through the pearly gates on a couple of occasions, whereas I've found nothing but shortcomings with private health care (except for the nice private rooms).
The experience of others leaves me flabbergasted though. Only very recently I noticed that the health of good friend who is diabetic was deteriorating rapidly. He was seen by different doctors who appeared to do very little. I tried to get him to go to A&E, but he was reluctant. After about 5 weeks during which he got to the point where he could barely do anything he got another appointment at the hospital for a scan. The response to his question about his condition was "Oh you've had a serious heart attack". I despair sometimes.
 

gordonrutter

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I must admit that every experience with the NHS I have had has been positive, personally. Used 111, a and e, had a hospital stay and general GP stuff have all been good. I appreciate not everyone has had this but in a cash stareved system I am grateful for the hard work and professionalism I have always encountered. Even this morning phoning my gp at 8 am and I have an appointment for later on today.
 

escargot

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A few years ago when I had pneumonia I received world-class treatment on the NHS. In fact they had me on a trolley stripped to my pants, gowned up and a drip in my arm so fast - within 10 minutes of arriving - that one turned to me, pointed to Techy and asked 'That IS your husband, isn't it? Not the taxi driver?'
 

maximus otter

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A few years ago when I had pneumonia I received world-class treatment on the NHS. In fact they had me on a trolley stripped to my pants, gowned up and a drip in my arm so fast - within 10 minutes of arriving - that one turned to me, pointed to Techy and asked 'That IS your husband, isn't it? Not the taxi driver?'
"Britain's healthcare system has been ranked just 30th in a new global study – lagging behind other European countries including Germany, Ireland, Spain, Slovenia and Italy.

A report published in The Lancet medical journal rates 192 countries in terms of their quality and access to healthcare.

The UK scored a total of 84.6 out of 100, placing it on an equal footing with Cyprus, Qatar, Malta, Portugal and the Czech Republic – with an especially low score for cancer care."

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...land-spain-slovenia-30th-lancet-a7744131.html

"What was medically necessary was done promptly" does not equal "world-class treatment".

maximus otter
 
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Tribble

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Workers renovating a house on Canal Street, Old Aberdeen, last November found bones in the soil of a garden, triggering a complex investigation into how they got there.

Police quickly ruled out foul play and tasked archaeology experts from Aberdeenshire Council and Aberdeen University to solve the mystery.

And after studying the bones and deciphering records from the last 200 years over an 11-month period, the team has pieced together a puzzle – determining the most likely explanation was a medical student trying not to fall foul of the law.


https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/fp...e-been-buried-medical-students-187-years-ago/
 

escargot

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Workers renovating a house on Canal Street, Old Aberdeen, last November found bones in the soil of a garden, triggering a complex investigation into how they got there.

Police quickly ruled out foul play and tasked archaeology experts from Aberdeenshire Council and Aberdeen University to solve the mystery.

And after studying the bones and deciphering records from the last 200 years over an 11-month period, the team has pieced together a puzzle – determining the most likely explanation was a medical student trying not to fall foul of the law.

https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/fp...e-been-buried-medical-students-187-years-ago/
This is how some people believe Dr Crippen's murdered wife's remains appeared in their cellar after she vanished. They reckon it wasn't Belle but bits of 'homework' dumped by medical students.
 

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This is how some people believe Dr Crippen's murdered wife's remains appeared in their cellar after she vanished. They reckon it wasn't Belle but bits of 'homework' dumped by medical students.
Crippen was training them? Or... ? how did they get access to the space?
 

escargot

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Crippen was training them? Or... ? how did they get access to the space?
The house was let out as rooms. Before the Crippens moved in some German medical students lived there. Back then medical students could take home body parts to dissect in their own time. As mentioned above, they had to be discreetly disposed of afterwards. The story goes that the German students may have buried theirs in the cellar.
 

escargot

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*sharp intake of breath*

:(
There are web pages about it. Many believe Crippen was stitched up by Bernard Spilsbury in the cause of validating the then-new science of pathology. It all hinged on whether a mark on the remains was a scar or a fold. The jury were in awe of Salisbury and there was nobody competent to challenge him.
 
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