Old Ways To Die

IbisNibs

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Hot Poker? .. you didn't know you were born sunshine, our Mam used a box of England Glory matches.
Being American, I had to look that up to learn more about this unfamiliar object. They certainly go well with accidents, I think: "England's Glory is a brand of non-safety matches, available in the United Kingdom, using a celebrated image of a Victorian battleship, HMS Devastation.

Another favourite was to climb to the top of the cone and drape yourself over with your feet one side and your head the other. This could make you feel deliciously dizzy, but you were stuck there until your mates stopped it spinning.
Sounds like good training for future astronauts.
 

escargot

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They certainly go well with accidents, I think: "England's Glory is a brand of non-safety matches,
The 'safety' aspect of matches is to do with the use of phosphorus in the manufacture. Matches were originally made with white phosphorus which is dangerous both in manufacture and use.

This page explains it in depth -
(ReAgent Chemical Services, a UK chemical manufacturing company. Their website is fascinating.)

How Do Safety Matches Work?

In safety matches, the combustible chemicals are separated between the match head and the striking pad. So a safety match can't be struck on anything except the box it came in.
(I used to believe this was to stop children stealing matches to play with fire!)

Crucially, the highly dangerous white phosphorus found in early matches, which could spontaneously ignite at 30C in users' pockets was later replaced with red phosphorus. This ignites at 240C so trouser pocket-fires became less common until the 21st century when e-cigarettes arrived.
 

Spudrick68

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I recall this ride from Blackpool Pleasure Beach. I can't find anything on it but i recall being told that someone died on it many years previously when a crane caught one of the rockets and it ended up on the promenade:
 

Spudrick68

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Oh my word another one from Blackpool Pleasure Beach, the Wild Mouse. I'm sure that it would be illegal now it was so dangerous and yet we went on it tons of times. I have a photo of my brother not smiling as a kid. we had been on this ride and he knocked a front tooth out and had a big gash on his chin. I thought it was hilarious!

As an aside I wonder if there is an urban myth about death on fairground rides?
 

Spudrick68

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Last one 'cos I've had a drink so I apologise. A POV video of The Big One at Blackpool. I've been on this too. I looked behind me to see if I could see Deepdale from the top but i didn't get the time to orientate where Preston was:
 

Analogue Boy

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The 'safety' aspect of matches is to do with the use of phosphorus in the manufacture. Matches were originally made with white phosphorus which is dangerous both in manufacture and use.

This page explains it in depth -
(ReAgent Chemical Services, a UK chemical manufacturing company. Their website is fascinating.)

How Do Safety Matches Work?

In safety matches, the combustible chemicals are separated between the match head and the striking pad. So a safety match can't be struck on anything except the box it came in.
(I used to believe this was to stop children stealing matches to play with fire!)

Crucially, the highly dangerous white phosphorus found in early matches, which could spontaneously ignite at 30C in users' pockets was later replaced with red phosphorus. This ignites at 240C so trouser pocket-fires became less common until the 21st century when e-cigarettes arrived.
Anyone remember London Lights? I think they were also know as Bengal Matches. These were super matches that burned in red and green. With a couple of boxes of these and some bangers, it’s a wonder we didn’t kill ourselves. London lights... tinfoil.... mini flare gun.


Just the thing for little kids on Bonfire Night.
 

brownmane

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There used to be a ride like that at Alton Towers in the 80's except it raised up higher and you stood on it in your own cage compartment round the edges, the g force or whatever pinning you to the back of your cage so there was no safety harness, just a thin metal chain … one year we watched it get up to full speed and as high as it could go and then some bloke on the ride threw up, spraying everyone in the first two lines of the que :twothumbs:
That's the one that I was talking about in post 101
 

brownmane

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Wild! .. the same type? .. I wonder how many others puked on that ride?
Exactly as you describe it. I only rode on it once, so couldn't remember the full details, but your reference to the metal chain (to do what?) and your description...yep.

Probably a whole lot puked. But how many died from choking on their puke and on that ride? As I said, I couldn't find any reference about the death occuring in my home town.
 

Krepostnoi

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Oh my word another one from Blackpool Pleasure Beach, the Wild Mouse. I'm sure that it would be illegal now it was so dangerous and yet we went on it tons of times. I have a photo of my brother not smiling as a kid. we had been on this ride and he knocked a front tooth out and had a big gash on his chin. I thought it was hilarious!

As an aside I wonder if there is an urban myth about death on fairground rides?
"Don't stand up." You mean you weren't strapped in?
 

EnolaGaia

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... As an aside I wonder if there is an urban myth about death on fairground rides? ...
I'm not sure what you're asking ...

Injuries and deaths on amusement rides in both fixed-location parks and mobile installations (e.g., traveling carnivals) are a real thing.

It's difficult to get a handle on the frequency and severity of such accidents, because the data is strewn across different jurisdictions, types, etc.

For example ... The Wikipedia lists of incidents / accidents is a hodge-podge of multiple specific lists:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Lists_of_amusement_park_incidents

This 2019 Safety Science article may be a good place to start (as a global overview):

Global incidence of theme park and amusement ride accidents
KathrynWoodcock
Safety Science
Volume 113, March 2019, Pages 171-179

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssci.2018.11.014

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925753518311238
 

Spudrick68

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I was wondering about urban myths that certain rides are 'cursed' and that word of mouth reports of deaths from the past are not based on fact. I recall being told, as on the video links I put on, of deaths on both the Wild Mouse and Rocket Ride at Blackpool Pleasure Beach. I'm not sure if these are urban myths or factual.

And we won't talk about 'Cloggy' on the Ghost Train...

As an aside I found this Trip Advisor review of the Wild Mouse ride. She writes "I can't believe I
queued up to be battered by a ride. I literally was thrown about in the cart. My head was thrashed back causing severe whiplash. " https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowU...asure_Beach-Blackpool_Lancashire_England.html
 
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hunck

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This thread sort of drifted onto childhood derring do but if you want to enjoy some medieval ways to die I recommend the Medieval Death Bot account on Twitter which just lists coroners reports from the middle ages. Lots of people were murdered by clerks. It's become a bit of a meme. https://twitter.com/DeathMedieval
Some poignant ones:

Robert le Wyther, died 1305, drowned in a sunken boat worth 4s. 6d.

William Scrym, died 1382, fell from a tree attempting to overthrow a nest of magpies

A child, died~1300 after being struck accidentally with a stick by a woman in a quarrel with another woman. Price of the stick is not named

John de Bois, died 1300 when a timber fell upon his head, inflicting a wound 4 inches long & 2 deep. The price of the wood, 1 penny
 

Mythopoeika

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Some poignant ones:

Robert le Wyther, died 1305, drowned in a sunken boat worth 4s. 6d.

William Scrym, died 1382, fell from a tree attempting to overthrow a nest of magpies

A child, died~1300 after being struck accidentally with a stick by a woman in a quarrel with another woman. Price of the stick is not named

John de Bois, died 1300 when a timber fell upon his head, inflicting a wound 4 inches long & 2 deep. The price of the wood, 1 penny
It's interesting that they were always zealous about noting the cost of something.
 
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