Sea Serpents & Monsters

Jerry_B

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#61
Fortean Times got a mention WRT this event on Channel 4 news tonight - Karl Shuker was even featured in a phone interview for his thoughts! :)
 

athyra

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#62
I think the Rednova article was just as premature as the yahoo one, I didn't see any mention of tests... They just called it a giant squid.

Correct me if I'm wrong.

**EDIT**

Yep, they haven't actually tested it. They say specimens have been sent off for testing, but not what the results are. Second, the say the only giant squid to have washed ashore previously was in 1896. Which is patently wrong. Thirdly, they say that specimen in 1896 was a squid categorically, which is far from a direct conclusion. Some scientists believed it to have been a giant octopus.

Also, most likely the remains were inside the stomache of the dead whale, when upon death they were ejected.

If you've ever seen a half digested fish, they often become transparent and jelly like.

Finally, correct me if I'm wrong, no giant squid speciment has been found that is even close to that size. 12.4m body length is massive. I think the largest giant squid ever found was something like that length, including arms.

Note, I am not saying it ISN'T a giant squid; but that it is far too early to state categorically.
 

athyra

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#64
Sperm whales eat giant squid regularly. In fact, giant squid were known solely from bits and pieces inside of whale digestive tracts for a very long time.

Oh, the 1896 "giant squid" they reference is also thought by some to have been a giant octopus. No clear evidence either way. (rednova, from this one story, appears to be shit).

I'm hoping giant octopus. But giant squid/whale blubber could as equally be the case.

P.S. Apparently a 6 foot long giant squid beak was found in a whale's digestive tract... that would make the squid itself something like 80 feet long including arms.

This find may be good for crypto + giant sea wierdies.
 
A

Anonymous

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#65
The whale was a humpback. The biggest thing they eat, being baleen whales, are herring. It would take a lot of vommed-up herring to make a 38 foot puddle of spew....

Where were the other blobsters found, by the way?
 
A

Anonymous

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#66
Please not time of my last post, as my brain seemed to have given up on me. I apologise for such blatant Doh!-ness.:rolleyes:
 

athyra

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#70
Yeah, the two pics featuring the suckers do look fake.

The find itself was well documented, but conclusions are divided between octopus/squid.

I think if the Chilean thing turns out to be an octopus (and not a squid or blubber), it would be really cool.

Another massive aquatic animal shows up out of the blue. Would be a "feather in the hat" for oceanic cryptozoology.
 
A

Anonymous

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#71
Ath said:
Another massive aquatic animal shows up out of the blue. Would be a "feather in the hat" for oceanic cryptozoology.
Or, a sign that something's going seriously wrong with the aqua-sphere? :(

I hadn't seen those pics before, either. Great thread! :yeay:
 

lopaka

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#72
If you can find a copy (might be out of print :mad: ), Monsters of the Sea by Richard Ellis is an excellent read, with a chapter devoted to Blobs and Globsters. It's not every cryptid book with chapters devoted to mermaids, sea serpents, etc gets good reviews from Nature and Scientific American. And he is no debunker by any stretch. Culture, natural history, biology, all covered. It has lots of illustrations, including three photos of the St. Augustine, FL thing. Pix of the Bermuda blob and the New Zealand Globster.

I'm not sure about any of these news reports out of Chile. There all about the same and use the word 'gelatenous' to describe the thing. Most of the other giant octopus-or-what-the-heck-is-it? accounts say it "was like trying to cut an automobile tire". So??? Hopefull, but not sold yet.
 
A

Anonymous

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#73
It vaguely reminded me of the end of 'Kraken Wakes'.
John Wyndham's novel, or Tennyson's poem?

The photos look somewhat like a giant octopus, with the arms having disentegrated completely and the body still retaining some of its structure. But if it has disintegrated that much, it could be almost anything...

There are a lot of deep-sea creatures which disintegrate if brought to the surface, because they are adapted to very high deep-sea pressures... wasn't there a deep-sea jellyfish discovered recently which completely disintegrated to a mostly-liquid mass when brought back up?

Surely it's far too big to be a lump of whale blubber? Even the biggest whales are only about twice the length of this thing, and their blubber is no more than about a metre thick AFAIK - that thing seems much too big, given the shape of a whale, to be a single piece... ?
 

dusikyon

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#75
Personally, it looks more like a giant octopus to me than anything else. This is based on the assumption that the 1890s FL creature was an octopus, which seems fairly likely due to recent tests on tissue samples. A good summary can be found here:

http://www.amnh.org/naturalhistory/0602/0602_pick.html

This Chilean beastie does look a bit flatter than the St. Augustine globster, but I suppose there could be any number of reasons for that.
 

Renigirl

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#76
UPDATE

according to this msn story, scientists are still puzzled.

http://www.msnbc.com/news/933992.asp

from above story:

In Chile, meanwhile, a researcher who took samples from the 40-foot-long mass said he was certain it is not a giant octopus. “I couldn’t tell you what it is but it’s not an octopus,” said Sergio Letelier, a scientist with the Museum of Natural History in Santiago.

most of the scientists they spoke to (i only gave this a quick read, mind) seem to concur that its not a giant octopus, but theyre not sure what it is. presumably msn will keep following up on this ... i hope.
 

ruffready

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#77
as do i hope, also. Renigirl

I would say, "if we can send a man to the moon", but ..
 
A

Anonymous

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#78
Perhaps these amorphous blobs of jelly are just that; a bacterial mat or a colonial jellyfish which has floated up from the sea bottom; something new, wierd, but unromantic.
Still reckon its whale, though.
 
A

Anonymous

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#79
This has just reminded me; I found a piece of whale blubber on Scarborough beach a couple of years ago-
following a fatal stranding, the Council had the poor thing cut up... about three weeks later there was still a metre square piece of blubber left- a kind of cream and black mottled slab.

From here-
http://www.msnbc.com/news/933992.asp?cp1=1
Pierce noted that his team has tested samples from four earlier finds and that electron microscopy determined that all were whale blubber collagen. The oldest specimen was found in 1896 on a Florida beach. The others were found on Australia’s Tasmanian coast in the 1960s, another off Bermuda and one along Nantucket Sound
oh well...
 

Philo_T

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#81
I just love the lovely image painted of the whale carcass putrefying at sea:

When a sperm whale dies at sea, it rots until it becomes a "skeleton suspended in a semi-liquid mass within a bag of skin and blubber," the scientists said. Eventually, the skin tears and the bones sinks while the skin and blubber float.
 

stu neville

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#83
Ah well, better we know for once, rather than the usual "samples taken for analysis, never heard of again" scenario :(.
 

Renigirl

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#85
i dont know which is worse...

the idea of giant, lurking octopi just waiting out there in the ocean somewhere ...

... or massive bags of dead, jellified whale and bones floating around in the ocean somewhere.

*yuk!*:cross eye

(did i mention im headed off to the sea sunday?)
 

dusikyon

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#86
Mystery solved, I suppose. It's still quite odd looking, even for a dead whale.
As for the 1896 specimen, the news reports which say it was identified as a whale cite information from 1995. The most recent studies, conducted just last year, suggest that the Florida globster was not even a mammal. Its tissue structure resembled that of an octopus. There may be hope yet!
;)
 

Yithian

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#88
JamesM said:
A story from CNN is identifying it as the remains of a sperm whale.

Hey ho...
Boo & Hiss. I do have a pet cthuloid theory that the giant squid are taking over. Think about it, in less than one year we've had: a new species discovered, young squidlings found, reports of a population boom, and the fact that in terms of total biomass they are the planet's dominant species - surely the stars are right!

Let me serve you oh fearsomely fishy lord, :gaga: Wibble
 

Yithian

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#89
This seems apt:

The Kraken

Below the thunders of the upper deep,
Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea,
His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee
About his shadowy sides; above him swell
Huge sponges of millennial growth and height;
And far away into the sickly light,
From many a wondrous and secret cell
Unnumber'd and enormous polypi
Winnow with giant arms the lumbering green.
There hath he lain for ages, and will lie
Battening upon huge sea-worms in his sleep,
Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
Then once by man and angels to be seen,
In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die.

Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809 - 1892)
 

Mighty_Emperor

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#90
In his house at R'lyeh dead Cthulhu waits blooping

I was just nosing around Bloop and Cthulhu (I know but one needs to find the location of one's mortal enemy before you can defeat him - that Sean Penn lookalike in my local was never much of a challenge). It came up in John Vincent Sanders' article in FT113:47 - a French version here:

http://www.oeildusphinx.com/r_rlyeh_01.html

and of especial interest is his claim that Bloop was detected halfway between New Zealand and Chile and the location of R'lyeh is 49 degrees 24' S and 128 degrees and 34' West (i.e. about New Zealand and Chile).

There is even a Bloopwatch (providing a Lovecraftian twist on current news stories):

http://www.bloopwatch.org/thebloop.html

He mentions a flat topped volcano as possibly being the source and I found this:

A PURE TONE IN THE OCEAN

(Source: David Schneider, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 8/97)

A strange tone is blasting through the ocean. These monochromatic signals are composed of one frequency, typically in the range of 12 cycles per second, making them purer than from any musical instrument. Individual blasts last from a few seconds to several minutes. These ocean-going sound waves -- called T waves -- were particularly cacophonous in 1991 and 1992.

Up to recently, the cause of the tones was a mystery: earthquakes produce much more short-lived signals; whales emit higher frequency sounds; harmonic tremors from magma bodies generate overtones.

The source of the tones was finally narrowed down by two French seismologists, Jacques Talandier and Emile Okal, to a poorly-surveyed region of the South Pacific. Last year, an expedition to the area revealed a flat-topped undersea volcano rising to within 400 feet of the surface. No volcanism was recorded at that time, but samples of fresh lava were recovered.

Talandier and Okal now theorize that an undersea eruption of a seamount would generate a cloud of steam bubbles sandwiched between the top of the seamount and the surface of the ocean. Computer simulations show that such a cloud would behave like a resonant cavity, acting much the same way as an organ pipe does when it sounds note. Sound waves would shoot up and down through the cloud at some resonant frequency, which was a function of the distance between the top of the seamount and the surface of the ocean. Little energy would bounce sideways, due to the diffuse boundary of the cloud. As a consequence, the fundamental frequency would remain steady and any overtones would be damped out by the gas bubbles.
http://www.nhne.com/newsbriefs/nhnenb72.html

but, of course, there could be a 'darker' explanation ;)

Anyway there is a point somewhere in here. He mentions a sighting reported by Keith L. Partain author of:

Psagent (2002)

Psi in the Sky: A New Approach to Ufo and Psi Phenomena (2001)

in a letter to Pursuit (v21, n2, p89, 1988) saying that a colleague saw "an enourmous seeing octopoid, possibly of ET origin" in Malaysia. Has anyone tracked this letter down?

I also found this reference online:

PARTAIN, Keith L.
1996 Another response to the giant octopus controversy. Info Journal, n° 74 : 26 (Winter).

and was wondering if it was along similar lines. Has anyone got the relevant issue to hand?

Emps
 
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