Venus Fly Trap & Its Vague Origins

stu neville

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#31
Bump!

St.Clair said:
You searched an urban legend site?

That was clever....

....You must take into account the known facts before demoting another sister subject in the chart of Fort. Lobelia and myself (if you read my first post) are picking up on a bigger fortean event.

Look:
Well, I tried the Straight Dope, And got this:
(extract)There are no scientists puzzled about the Venus flytrap, only "scientists."
The VFT is the only member of its genus, Dionaea, but it has several relatives in the genus Drosera, which also happen to be carnivorous plants, known as "sundews." Together, these two genera make up the plant family Droseraceae. Sundews occur all over the world, while the VFT is limited to bogs throughout North and South Carolina--and, despite any X-Files episodes to the contrary, neither of the Carolinas used to be a meteor crater.
Whatever anyone says about Snopes, the Dope tends to come through. I trust them.

Stu
 
A

Anonymous

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#32
Fair enough!:)

Its funny though.........I grow (illegal) drosera spp. in my garden. The highlands have many sphagnum bogs that support them. They are a protected species and are notfound in many locations. Like the venus fly trap, they derive little nutrition from the bog land in which they live. Its just as well because many of these bogs are as near to sterile as you could get.

We also have the bladderwort which is submersed in the water. Its root area has little pouches (bladders) that are able to consume waterborn insects.

I really did not know this latest thinking on the family connection.

So......the entire Drosera family is from outerspace!:p ;)
 
A

Anonymous

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#33
Re: Bump!

There are no scientists puzzled about the Venus flytrap, only "scientists."
I find the origins of the species very puzzling. I am equally amazed at sundews and orchids. I find the speed at which Oxford ragwort covered the british countryside very puzzling. I find the semi parasitic plants equally intriguing. I dont believe these to be aliens and nor do I believe the venus fly trap to be an alien. I do however acknowledge the possibility that life first began on earth when it contacted another organism. I also acknowledge pure indiginous origins. They are just possibilities. I take exception to his statement because it seems to indicate that it is possible to be above all knowledge and that he is part of that elite. Its related to drosera?........which means its now "covered" by science? We know it all again, do we? If they did'nt find them puzzling in the first place (like the original botanists did) then they could never work out that:

.....it has several relatives in the genus Drosera, which also happen to be carnivorous plants, known as "sundews." Together, these two genera make up the plant family Droseraceae. Sundews occur all over the world, while the VFT is limited to bogs throughout North and South Carolina.
We would never know anything if we never puzzled at it first.

I regret my response to arielsnake, though.............
 
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Yithian

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#35
Just to add some linguistic trivia, the Korean word for a Venus Fly-Trap translates as 'Fly Hell'.

I must find out whether that is from the Chinese.
 

GNC

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#37
Just to add some linguistic trivia, the Korean word for a Venus Fly-Trap translates as 'Fly Hell'.

I must find out whether that is from the Chinese.
Rather fly-hell than hell-fly.
 

Gizmos Mama

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#39
My present collection, Drosera Binata, D. Capenensis, D. Rotundifola, D. Anglica, lots of seedlings of the last two possiblbly some crosses as well. Sarrasenia Leucaphilla, S. Flava and Dionaea Musipula, just need to be carefull yhis winter. View attachment 11877
Wow, amazing!
I so wish I didn't live in a high altitude semi arid climate, and could grow beautiful/deadly plants like this!

As an aside, and only off topic a little, my favourite weird plant is the pomegranate, which is unique, in that it doesn't have any known related species existing in the world. (and so yummy!)
 

Bullseye

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#41
Wow, amazing!
I so wish I didn't live in a high altitude semi arid climate, and could grow beautiful/deadly plants like this!
Well, if you can water them with rain-water, maybe you have a water butt, (I sincerely hope that dos'nt mean something entirely different in the States), and can plant them up in peat and sharp sand you should be able to grow them. Got to keep them damp all the time. The three troughs in the above photo are in one big container that is always full of rain water.
 

Gizmos Mama

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#42
Well, if you can water them with rain-water, maybe you have a water butt, (I sincerely hope that dos'nt mean something entirely different in the States), and can plant them up in peat and sharp sand you should be able to grow them.
Yes, I have a rain barrel! lol
Unfortunately, I'd d have to move them inside during the -30 C winters, and there's no room.
 

Bullseye

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#43
yeah, ok, so minus 30 is a little bit outside their "comfort zone", try Sundews and Venus Fly traps indoors on your windowsills ?.
 
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