Extinct? Missing? Not So Much (Rediscovered Animal Species; MIA Or Believed Extinct)

Rrose_Selavy

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The Times June 29, 2006


Alien giant that crept out of the woodwork
By Simon de Bruxelles





::nobreak::A GIANT beetle thought to have died out in Britain has been discovered crawling round a carpenter’s workshop.

The 16.5cm (6½in) giant capricorn beetle was at first mistaken for a toy by the man who found it, Ben Perrot.

“I thought someone had left it there to give me a fright,” he said. “It looked like something you would get from a toy shop but then it started to move.”

Mr Perrot called in colleagues who helped him to put the beetle into a glass jar.

Experts have confirmed that the beetle is a giant capricorn, which was believed to have disappeared in this country in the early 18th century. Cerambyx cerdo is still found in France and other parts of the Continent, but it is classified as extremely rare across its range.

The body of the adult, which lives for only a few weeks, measures 5cm, but its antennae stretch a further 11cm. These are used by males to detect the pheromone scent emitted by females.

The beetles make a screeching noise by rubbing their legs together to warn off predators and have large, powerful jaws capable of biting through wood. They can give a nasty nip if handled.

The giant capricorn was thought to have died out in Britain when the demand for timber meant that fallen oak trees were cut up and used rather than left to rot. The beetles spend two years as larvae burrowing through wood until they emerge to look for a mate.

Mr Perrot, from Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, spotted the beetle on a plank of wood as he was making a piece of furniture. “I’d never seen anything like it before,” he said. “It looks like something out of a science fiction film or like a monster from Doctor Who. I wasn’t too worried about it because it was a beetle, but I wouldn’t have liked it if it had been a spider.”

The creature was being studied yesterday by Ian Morgan, an entomologist, who said that it was an exciting discovery. “This is the first time in centuries that it has been seen here in Wales,” he said. “It is a male and he was found in timber labelled English oak. I realised it was something special as soon as I saw it. It is very rare and is the largest long-horned beetle in Europe.

“This type of long-horn beetle was supposed to have been extinct in the

UK since 1700. The beetle depends on very large oaks for its grubs to feed on over a long period. It is illegal to kill it anywhere.”

Workers at the furniture factory have set up a tank for the beetle to live in and plan to donate its body to the National Museum of Wales when it dies.

The wood from which the beetle emerged was a piece of English oak that had been supplied by Barrett timber merchants in Carmarthen.

Tony Giles, manager of the furniture workshop, said: “It tried to run off across the table but we popped him in a jar. We didn’t have a clue what it was at first so we looked him up on the internet and called in an expert.

“We found more than one so some breeding seems to have taken place. The origin of the wood is difficult to pinpoint because recycled oak gets mixed with fresh stuff.

“The experts say that these beetles have not been around for a long time, but it’s hard for a layman to understand how they can know that. Who can say what is crawling around out there?”

Maxwell Barclay, curator of beetles at the Natural History Museum in London, believes that the beetle — or its parents — originally hitched a ride on imported timber.

There has been no conclusive evidence of the presence of the capricorn beetle living in wood in Britain more recently than the Bronze Age.

He said: “It’s an extremely exciting find. The fact that it is a fully grown beetle means that will have lived most of its entire life in the UK, although it is doubtful that it is a native species.

“It was probably imported in with a batch of Hungarian oak and moved to the native oak in the timber yard. The fact that it was found alive at such a mature stage of it’s growth may be an indicator of climatic change. Its presence raises the exciting prospect of it becoming a native beetle once more.”

CREEPIEST CRAWLIES

A giant capricorn was found in Warwickshire last year but is thought to have come in on imported timber

Britain’s largest beetle is the stag at 7.5cm

There are 350,000 known species of beetle, 20 per cent of all animals
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0, ... 86,00.html
 

WhistlingJack

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'Extinct' quail sighted in India

A quail believed to have been extinct for nearly 80 years has been seen by a prominent ornithologist in the north-eastern Indian state of Assam.


The Manipur Bush-Quail was seen earlier this month by Anwaruddin Choudhury, a wildlife specialist.

Bird experts say that Mr Choudhury is highly respected and that they believe he saw the quail even though he was unable to photograph it.

Experts say the sighting is one of the most exciting in India in recent years.

"This creature has almost literally returned from the dead," the Wildlife Trust of India's conservation director, Rahul Kaul, told the BBC.

"Although there was always a chance that such a bird could be seen again because of the large expanse of territory it could inhabit in the north-east of India, it's still a very exciting development.

"Now I hope other 'extinct birds' may re-appear, such as the Himalayan Quail - thought to be extinct for 125 years - and the Pink Headed Duck which also had not been seen for a long time," Dr Kaul said.

The grey-and-black streaked quail was spotted by Mr Choudhury in Assam's Manas national park.

It used to reside extensively in eastern India and what is now Bangladesh.

Correspondents say it was last seen in 1932 in what is now the north-east Indian state of Manipur.

"I'm thrilled to be part of history by sighting this shy little bird after 74 years. It's a rare privilege," Mr Choudhury told the AFP news agency.

"The bird appeared like a flash in front of our jeep and after some time it slowly moved inside the thick undergrowth.

"I knew the moment I saw the bird it was the Manipur Bush-Quail. I've been on the lookout for this species for a very long time."

The 25cm (10-inch) bird was formally identified in Manipur by British civil servant Allan Octavian Hume in 1880 when Britain ruled India.

The bird bred in grassland areas, and was usually seen in small groups of four to 12.

Story from BBC NEWS:

Published: 2006/06/28 14:29:53 GMT

© BBC MMVI
 

ramonmercado

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Photo in the News: Extinct Dwarf Buffalo Discovered




October 17, 2006—An extinct species of pygmy water buffalo that once lived in the Philippines has been discovered—thanks to people's need to do household chores.

Filipino mining engineer Michael Armas found an unusual set of fossils about 40 years ago as he was excavating a hillside on the island of Cebu (Philippines map) looking for phosphate, a naturally occurring compound used in detergents and fertilizers. He took the fossils home with him, where they sat in a jar for several years.

Eventually the bones were delivered to the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. People often bring bones to the museum hoping they've made a rare find, museum curator Lawrence Heaney told the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

"Most of the time it's pork chops from somebody's dinner, that sort of thing," Heaney said. But this time the delivery bore fruit.

The bones, the scientists found, belonged to a species of water buffalo that probably lived between 10,000 and 100,000 years ago. The tiny bovine, seen in color in this artist's conception, stood up to 2.5 feet (0.7 meter) tall and weighed about 350 pounds (160 kilograms).

The extinct creatures were similar to a modern species of small water buffalo that lives on the nearby Philippines island of Mindoro. That animal—the middle outline in the drawing—reaches about 3 feet (0.9 meter) tall. It is related to the Asian water buffalo—the topmost outline—an even larger modern species that stands about 6 feet (1.8 meters) tall and can weigh up to a ton.

"Finding this new species is a great event in the Philippines," Angel Bautista, of the National Museum of the Philippines, said in a press release. "Only a few fossils of elephants, rhinos, pig, and deer have been found here previously. We have wonderful living biodiversity, but we have known very little about our extinct species from long ago."

And the find carries special significance, the Field Museum's experts suggest, because it could offer insight into a phenomenon called island dwarfing, a process in which large species confined to isolated islands tend to grow smaller due to fewer resources.

Island dwarfing is one of the competing explanations for the famous "hobbit" human fossils found in 2003 on the Philippines island of Flores. The fossils represent a distinct species of human that stood only 3.3 feet (1 meter) tall and lived at the same time as modern humans, some 13,000 years ago, the hobbits' discoverers say.

—Victoria Gilman


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... ffalo.html
 

Kondoru

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That is a mighty small cow.

Do you think it will fit in my rabbit hutch?
 

songhrati

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From the Hawkesbury (New South Wales) Gazette.
link

"Extinct" marsupial may be alive and well - NSW
Rebecca Lang

A HAWKESBURY resident may have stumbled upon one of the most exciting zoological finds of the decade - a small marsupial previously thought to be extinct on Australia's mainland.

East Kurrajong resident and Hawkesbury Gazette newspaper employee Nicole Palmer was driving along Roberts Creek Road recently when she spotted a couple of unusual-looking animals.

"There was two of them. One was smaller. I pulled up and the larger one kept hopping towards the car so I strated rolling back down the hill and honking my horn," she said.

"They were both dark brown with white spots around its jowl and neck area, 3-4 inches of the tip of its tail was white and it didn't look like a tiger quoll, it was much smaller and less heavy."

From her description, NPWS ranger Vickii Lett and University of Western Sydney biologist Professor Rob Close believe Ms Palmer may have spotted two Eastern quolls.

Eastern quolls are about the size of domestic cats with pointed noses and soft fawn, brown or black-coloured fur broken up by white spots, and a bushy tail with a white tip.

They are much smaller than their cousins, the endangered Spotted-tail or 'Tiger' quoll, which has a coarse, reddy-brown coat with white spots and is half as big again as the eastern quoll.

The eastern quoll was last sighted on the mainland in the 1960s in the Sydney suburb of Vaucluse.

Since that time dogs, cats and people have encroached on the small marsupial's habitat to the extent that they are now believed to be extinct on the mainland.

However, Eastern quolls remain prolific in Tasmania, preferring to live in dry grassland and forest bordering farm paddocks.

Ms Lett said National Parks would be acting on the sighting of the protected species.

"We'll talk to Dr Rob Close at UWS and see what we can do," she said.

"In the meantime, we'd like residents to keep an eye out and if they see something unusual, take a picture of it with their camera or mobile phone.

"We'd also like people in the area to be careful about letting their dogs and cats roam around."

Dr Close, who recently urged residents to keep an eye out for signs of rare wildlife, said he was thrilled about the sighting.

"If it is in fact a true sighting, it's very exciting," Dr Close said.

"There's been a few sightings over the past few years, unverified, so it raises hopes that they are still around.

"If they can live in Vaucluse until the '60s, you'd think there would be a chance they could survive in these more isolated places.

"Nobody knows what knocked the eastern quolls off. Disease was a possibility, and if that's all over now, their numbers could be building up again."

The finding was made in late October.
 

lardfan

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I saw a mother and baby pair of spotted tail quolls in Wilsons Promontory National Park (in south eastern Victoria) in the Tidal River campground in 2002, just sauntering through at dusk, not bothered by my presence at all. They're not extinct on the mainland but are very rare, and the last sighting at the Prom was in the 70s. I didn't even know what they were when I saw them. They are an extremely odd animal. I hope they weren't caught in the Prom's bushfires of last summer (was it last summer or the one before?)
 

evilsprout

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The Madagascar Pochard, thought extinct since 1992, has been rediscovered.

http://www.birdlife.org/news/news/2006/ ... edisc.html

Diving duck resurfaces
20-11-2006

The Madagascar Pochard, a diving duck last sighted in 1991 and feared ‘Possibly Extinct’, has been rediscovered during a survey in remote northern Madagascar.

Conservationists from The Peregrine Fund Madagascar Project, discovered nine adults and four recently-hatched young on a remote lake, and have since revisited the site for further observations and data.

“This is an exciting discovery that strengthens our conviction that putting well-trained biologists into the field to learn about species is critical for conservation success,” said Rick Watson, International Programs Director for The Peregrine Fund.

“With better knowledge about the habitat requirements of the Madagascar Pochard comes greater hopes for protecting the species and this area of marshland – a habitat on which many other threatened species may depend.” —Vony Raminoarisoa, Director of BirdLife International Madagascar Programme

The Madagascar Pochard Aythya innotata was until recently listed as Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct). The last pochard sighting was on Lake Alaotra in the Central Plateau of Madagascar in 1991 when a male was captured and kept in Antananarivo Zoological and Botanical Gardens until its death one year later. The lack of subsequent records despite intensive searches, and the intensity of threats to the species, had led to it being tagged as Possibly Extinct.


The last record of multiple birds dates back to June 1960 when 20 birds were sighted on Lake Alaotra.


“After so much searching, and so long without a sighting, hope seemed to be fading for this species." said Vony Raminoarisoa, Director of BirdLife International Madagascar Programme. "With better knowledge about the habitat requirements of the Madagascar Pochard comes greater hopes for protecting the species and this area of marshland – a habitat on which many other threatened species may depend.”

The decline of the Madagascar Pochard is thought to have started in the mid-20th century and has been linked with degrading lake and marshland habitat from introduced plant and fish species, conversion to rice paddies, and burning. Little is known about the pochard, an extremely secretive and often solitary bird that prefers shallow and marshy habitat.

"The finding encourages us to consider more seriously the possibly that Madagascar's other 'Possibly Extinct' waterbird, the Alaotra Grebe, may not have been restricted to Lake Alaotra (where it no longer occurs); perhaps it occurred elsewhere, and perhaps it still does" said Roger Safford, Programme & Projects Manager, BirdLife International.
 

ramonmercado

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Endangered Turtle Found in Vietnam

(AP) -- Researchers in Vietnam announced Friday they have caught one of the world's most endangered turtles in the wild, a development which could bolster efforts to protect the species from hunters and collectors.

The Vietnamese Pond turtle, found only in lowland areas of Vietnam - was caught in late November in Quang Nam province, according to the Asia Turtle Program.

While the turtles are still found in markets and pet shops, it was the first time researchers have caught one in the wild in 65 years.

The World Conservation Union has classified the turtle known as Mauremys annamensis as "endangered" and conservationists say it is also on a list of the world's top 25 endangered turtle species.
http://www.physorg.com/printnews.php?newsid=84779272
 
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evilsprout

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A Brazillian woodpecker has been rediscovered after 80 years

One of Brazil’s most enigmatic birds has reappeared after an absence of 80 years. The news of the rediscovery of Caatinga Woodpecker Celeus obrieni has delighted conservationists in the region and gives hope for other ‘lost’ birds feared extinct in South America.

Caatinga Woodpecker was found by a Brazilian ornithologist Advaldo do Prado whilst surveying in the Tocantins region of Central Brazil. This enigmatic species had not been observed since its initial discovery in 1926.

“Rediscovering birds is what many conservationists dream about,” said Pedro Develey IBA Coordinator of SAVE Brasil (BirdLife in Brazil), “There is something truly special about finding a bird that many of us considered ‘lost’ for so long.”

The woodpecker was previously known only from a single specimen collected in Brazil and deposited in the American Museum of Natural History, New York. The specimen was traditionally considered a subspecies of Rufous-headed Woodpecker C. spectabilis also from South America. It wasn’t until a recent review by ornithologists involved with the South American Classification Committee of the American Ornithologists' Union concluded that dramatic differences in the plumage of Caatinga Woodpecker warranted full species status.

The new discovery was found approximately 200 miles east of the area where the previous specimen was taken in 1926, suggesting to conservationists that other individuals may lie in similar habitats in the eastern part of Central Brazil. BirdLife International, the official Red List Authority for birds for the IUCN Red List, are to formally propose that Caatinga Woodpecker be listed as Critically Endangered.

“Rediscoveries like this allow us crucial opportunities for understanding behaviour, ecology and for gauging conservation status with a view to creating protected areas within the Tocantins, a region that has suffered in recent years with expansion of agriculture and new road projects.” said Pedro Develey.

The new finding comes in the wake of a number of recent bird rediscoveries in Brazil including Golden-crowned Manakin, Rufous-fronted Antthrush, White-winged Potoo, Kaempfer’s Tody-tyrant and most recently, Cone-billed Tanager.

“Caatinga Woodpecker and rediscoveries like it provide hope for other South American birds currently missing and feared extinct, some of which haven’t been seen for over 150 years.” said Stuart Butchart, Global Species Coordinator, BirdLife International and co-author of ‘Lost and Found: a gap analysis for the Neotropical avifauna’, a recent article on the rediscovery of ‘lost’ birds.

Data from BirdLife International’s Global Species Programme states that Brazil has more globally threatened birds than any other country on earth. Of the 111 species at risk of extinction in Brazil, 98 live in the Atlantic forest, which has been reduced by more than 90% of its original extent.

For more information on other ‘lost’ bird species in South America download a copy of ‘Lost and Found: a gap analysis for the Neotropical avifauna’ (PDF), extracted from ‘Neotropical Birding 2006’
http://www.birdlife.org/news/news/2006/ ... edisc.html
 

ogopogo3

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http://www.livescience.com/animalworld/ ... snake.html

Blind Snake Rediscovered After 100-Year Absence

By Ker Than
LiveScience Staff Writer

A rare blind snake has been rediscovered in Madagascar a century after its last sighting. The snake, which looks like a long, skinny pink worm, was only known from two other specimens, both discovered in 1905.

“They’re really rare because they’re subterranean,” said blind-snake expert Van Wallach of Harvard University who described the new specimen. “You can’t just go out anytime you want and collect these things. You can dig forever and never find them.”

Scientists captured the snake [image], called Xenotyphlops mocquardi, alive in 2005 during an expedition to collect reptiles and amphibians in northern Madagascar. The specimen was approximately 10 inches long and about as thick as a pencil.

There are about 15 species of blind snakes on the island, so the unique nature of the team’s find wasn’t apparent until the blind snake specimen was sent to museum experts for identification and possible comparison with dead specimens in their collections.

“They sent it to me and I immediately recognized what it was,” Wallach told LiveScience.

Vincenzo Mercurio, a scientist on the expedition that discovered the snake, said he didn’t think anything special about the catch at the time. “It was just routine field work,” said Mercurio, who is from the Forschungsinstitut und Naturhistorisches Museum Senckenberg in Germany.

Blind snakes, as their name suggests, have poor vision.They hunt mainly by smell, which they detect via a combination of their tongues and an organ located on the roof of their mouths called Jacobson’s organ.

“They basically see shadows and back and forth movements,” Wallach said.

Blind snakes, and a related group, called worm snakes, live underground or beneath a layer of rocks or sand. The two snake families are negatively phototaxic, meaning they avoid light whenever possible.

“If you catch one or bring it to the surface, it immediately wants to crawl under something or crawl down into the ground,” Wallach said.

Blind and worm snakes are the only snakes that dine solely on insects. They feed on the eggs, larvae and pupae of ants and termites, Wallach said.

Scientists believe the two groups separated from a common ancestor sometime during the Cretaceous period, when their larger reptilian cousins, the dinosaurs, still walked the Earth.

Blind snakes can sometimes appear to be sighted. “Most blind snakes and worm snakes do have eyes, but they’re vestigial," Wallach said. "Sometimes they’re only little black spots, sometimes they‘re well developed enough to have a pupil and an iris, but they’re very, very tiny.”

The rediscovered blind snake is detailed in the Feb. issue of the journal Zootaxa.
 

TheQuixote

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This is really cool:

1st Beaver Spotted in NYC in 200 Years

NEW YORK Feb 23, 2007 (AP)— Beavers grace New York City's official seal. But the industrious rodents have not been seen in the flesh here for as many as 200 years until this week.

Biologists videotaped a beaver swimming up the Bronx River on Wednesday. Its twig-and-mud lodge had been spotted earlier on the river bank, but the tape confirmed the presence of the animal itself [...]
ABC news

(the NYC official seal can be seen here)
 

rynner2

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Re: Extinct bird found in Arkansas

krobone said:
A woodpecker thought to be extinct for 60 years is re-discovered:

A group of wildlife scientists believe the ivory-billed woodpecker is not extinct. They say they have made seven firm sightings of the bird in central Arkansas. The landmark find caps a search that began more than 60 years ago, after biologists said North America’s largest woodpecker had become extinct in the United States.
..or maybe not:
Woodpecker's existence questioned

Further doubt has been cast on the claim that a bird long-thought extinct is alive in North America.
Fleeting video footage of what many experts believed to be an ivory-billed woodpecker was captured in 2004 in an Arkansas swamp.

But since then, searches have failed to find any hard evidence for the bird.

Now, Aberdeen University's Dr Martin Collinson has told the journal BMC Biology that the video may simply show a pileated woodpecker in flight.

Dr Collinson has re-analysed the footage and says the bird in the pictures appears to have black trailing wing edges rather than the unique white features associated with the ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis).

The videoed bird also appears to flap its wings at the rate a pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) would - 8.6 times per second.

Format fooling

"A poor quality video of pileated woodpeckers can look like ivory-billed woodpeckers - and in that respect it can catch an observer out; and a mistake can be made. And in this case, I think a mistake has been made," Dr Collinson told BBC News.

The Aberdeen researcher also argues that the missing bird's large size and colourful plumage would surely have been seen by now in the many follow-up surveys.

"The ivory-billed woodpecker isn't some small brown bird that can only be identified by one in a thousand; it's an enormous black and white bird with a red head," argued Dr Collinson.

"OK, these swamps are pretty remote, but there are hundreds of people in there, right now, looking for the ivory-billed woodpecker. Eventually these birds would turn up."

But others still hold to the idea that the video did indeed show an ivory-billed woodpecker.

John Fitzpatrick, a director of Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology, said that different formats of the footage resulted in "comparing apples to oranges".

He told the Associated Press that Dr Collinson's evidence about similarities in the birds' colouring, wing patterns and flight patterns were skewed as a result.

When the 2004 video was released, it stunned ornithologists worldwide, with some comparing the discovery to finding the dodo.

It ignited hope that other extinct birds might be clinging on to survival in isolated places.

The last confirmed sighting was in 1944.

Researchers hope robot bird-watchers may yet have the final say. Automated cameras have been set up in the Big Woods refuge of Arkansas to continue to spy for the elusive creature.

"I am happy to be proved wrong; a good photo would end this debate," said Dr Collinson.

"I would be delighted; I would love to see an ivory-billed woodpecker."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6458591.stm
 

rynner2

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However, this little bug seems for real:
Beetle re-emerges after 60 years

A beetle thought to be extinct in the UK since the 1940s has been rediscovered in south Devon.
The short-necked oil beetle was found by an amateur entemologist during a wildlife survey on National Trust (NT) land between Bolt Head and Bolt Tail.

The beetles were last recorded at Chailey Common, Sussex in 1948.

Up to 40 of the insects, which survive by hitching rides on miner bees as larvae and then eating the bees' eggs, were found at the Devon site.

The beetle, which gets its name from the highly toxic oil secretions it produces when threatened, is also known as Meloe brevicollis.

The adult beetles, which live for about three months, lay up to 1,000 eggs in a burrow in soft or sandy soil and eggs hatch in the following spring.

Once they have hatched the young larvae crawl up on to vegetation, often lying in wait in flowers, where they hitch a ride on mining bees and are involuntarily taken back to the bee's nest.

SHORT-NECKED OIL BEETLE
Adult beetles are flightless, large and slow moving
The bodies (especially of females) are swollen
The wing cases are short and rudimentary
The young larvae are known as triungulins after their three claws
They then devour the bee's egg and also the protein rich pollen stores the bee intended to provide for its own larvae.

But the flightless creature's natural habitats and the populations of bees they rely on have been decimated by intensive farming practices.

The NT said the coastal strip of land where the oil beetle was discovered by Bob Beckford had been managed less intensively as farmland, creating a habitat where the beetle could survive undisturbed.

This site will now be monitored and the lifecycle of the beetle examined in more detail so the land is managed in a way that helps the insect flourish.

David Bullock, head of nature conservation at the NT, said: "The discovery of a beetle that was thought to be extinct for nearly 60 years is an amazing story of survival, particularly for a species with such an interdependent lifecycle.

"It's great that this oil beetle, with its fascinating lifestyle, has survived against all the odds and is back in business on the south Devon coast."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/devon/6464531.stm
 

PeniG

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The ivory-bill is real, too. The video is not great evidence, frankly, because it's so fuzzy you can find anything you're looking for in it. It's not the evidence that convinces me. We're talking multiple sightings by experienced birdwatchers and ornithologists who were, though hyped up to see it, also continually second-guessing themselves, and recordings of calls, made over an extended period. Also, when you go back over the unconfirmed sightings - including photographs - since 1944, you find a lot of damning of data that would be considered good had the bird not been declared extinct.

One of the most convincing tidbits to be found in The Grail Bird, Tim Gallagher's write-up for the lay audience, is that the birdwatcher who persuaded people to undertake this search didn't see it during that field season. This guy knew, knew, knew that he'd seen it, was desperate to prove it, was out looking every day, and had chances on top of chances to confabulate a sighting - but he didn't. Other people saw it, people who didn't really believe him or their own eyes and kept trying to turn what they saw into a pileated, but couldn't.

I'm a confabulating birdwatcher myself. I know all the dodges. I know the state of mind. These people are not guilty. Either there was an ivorybill in that swamp, or there was a fairy masquerading as an ivorybill. (The second, alas, is a necessary caveat to all cryptozoological stories that don't result in a bird in the hand.) The evidence against them amounts to nitpicking of the "I didn't see it so it doesn't exist" variety.

I don't believe things very often. The ivorybill evidence convinces me.
 

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Pig-footed Bandicoot Rises From the Dead
By David Grimm
ScienceNOW Daily News
1 April 2007

A kitten-sized Australian marsupial thought to have gone extinct over a century ago appears to be alive and well. The pig-footed bandicoot was last spotted in 1901, but today researchers provided fresh evidence of its existence. "It's a miracle," says Jared Watson, a conservation biologist at the University of Brunswick in Melbourne. "I thought we'd seen the last of this 8-teated, posteriorly pouched creature."
Known for its rabbity ears, thin legs, and hooflike nails, the pig-footed bandicoot (Chaeropus ecaudatus) was once widespread throughout inland Australia. Its name literally means "tailless pig-foot", a misnomer applied to a specimen that--unbeknownst to first describer--had lost its long, orange-brown tail in a taxidermic mishap. European encroachment in the latter half of the 19th century permanently altered the bandicoot's habitat, setting the creature on the path to extinction. Famed Australian naturalist Gerard Krefft is thought to have recovered two of the last specimens, but tired of subsisting on meager field rations, he ate them both. "I am sorry to say that my appetite overruled my love for science," Krefft wrote in his journal.

Now, a medley of multimedia may make up for Krefft's hasty stomach. In today's issue of Nature Zoology: Australia and Surrounding Islands, a team led by biologist Peter Shadbolt of the University of Queenstown in New Zealand documents three dramatic pieces of evidence for the pig-footed bandicoot's continued existence. The first is a photo taken by an American tourist on a walkabout. Although her thumb obscures most of the shot, a toe with a tiny, hooflike nail can clearly be seen in the lower right-hand corner. Then there's the audio evidence: At the end of a track entitled "Get Off My (Out)Back" from Australian rock band AC/DC's most recent album, Rockin' the Wilderness, there is the faint sound of two squeals quickly followed by a high-pitched yowl. "The band recorded the album outdoors," Shadbolt explains. "They must have caught a pig-footed bandicoot mating call during one of their sessions."

But the most convincing evidence, says Shadbolt, is a grainy video that showed up on YouTube in December. The clip, apparently intended to document the humiliation one man suffers after being hit in the groin by his own boomerang, catches a rabbit-sized creature fleeing with the pig-footed bandicoot's characteristic awkward gallop. "I snerked my Guinness when I saw the boomerang thwack the guy," Shadbolt says. "I almost missed the bandicoot footage."

In total, the evidence is so persuasive, says conservationist Terry Shaw of Canada's National Wildlife Alliance, that Australian game officials should set up a perimeter around the center of the continent and begin searching for more bandicoots. Korean stem cell researcher Woo Suk Hwang has offered to clone the animal should any of its DNA be found.

But not everyone is convinced. "I'd say the creature in that video is more young-cat-sized than kitten-sized," says marsupial expert Langston Buckwalter of St. Elizabeth College in Oxford, U.K. "And its gait is clumsy rather than awkward." But most troubling, says Buckwalter, is the fact that Shadbolt's team published a nearly identical study on this date last year. "Something about the first of April tends to bring the dodos out of the woodwork," he says.


http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/co ... 2007/401/1
 

lopaka

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Two caveats: I've not so much as googled any of the names in the above article and it is 7:30am here and I'm still on my first cup of coffee...but, umm, that piece (also appears on today's breaking news page) is an April Fools put-on...isn't it?
 

ramonmercado

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lopaka3 said:
Two caveats: I've not so much as googled any of the names in the above article and it is 7:30am here and I'm still on my first cup of coffee...but, umm, that piece (also appears on today's breaking news page) is an April Fools put-on...isn't it?
Yeah, I also noted it on the April Foll thread yesterday.
 

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Striped rabbit spotted in Sumatra
One of the rarest species of rabbit in the world has been spotted for only the third time in the last 35 years.
The Sumatran striped rabbit was photographed in late January on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, the Wildlife Conservation Society said.

The species is listed as critically endangered by the World Conservation Union, due to loss of habitat.

The rabbit was previously photographed in 2000, with the last sighting by a scientist back in 1972.

Habitat risk

The 30cm-long rabbit was photographed by a camera trap in Bukit Barisan National Park, said Colin Poole, director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's Asia Program.

The sighting also highlighted the need to protect the habitat of the species, also known as nesolagus netscheri, from threats such as farming, he said.

"This rabbit is so poorly known that any proof of its continued existence at all is great news, and confirms the conservation importance of Sumatra's forests," Mr Poole said.

Back in 1999, researchers discovered another species of striped rabbit in the Annamite Mountains between Laos and Vietnam, and named it the Annamite striped rabbit.

Genetic samples revealed the species were distinct, though closely related, most likely diverging about 8 million years ago.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/w ... 530365.stm

Published: 2007/04/05 15:54:58 GMT

© BBC MMVII
 

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Dino-aged Reptile Makes a Comeback
www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2008-11/ ... s-comeback
The world's oldest lizard-like reptile, with roots dating back to the Triassic period, has been found breeding again for the first time in 200 years
By Jaya Jiwatram

Tuatara: Before the close of this century, the tuatara may lose the first half of its topical designation and become, simply, a fossil. Climate change will be responsible for raising the soil temperature in its remaining island habitats around New Zealand to the point at which female hatchlings cannot survive. After the introduction of rats to the mainland by early explorers, the tuatara's population was set on a course toward extinction. Now its only remaining members there are in a fenced wildlife sanctuary. This cousin of both lizards and snakes is the only remaining member of an order of reptiles stretching back 200 million years. It is perhaps most curiously known for the third eye set on top of its skull, the exact function of which is largely speculative. While it is connected to the brain by a dedicated nerve, the parietal eye is covered with scales and is hidden from view soon after birth, leading some to believe it is responsible for maintaining circadian rhythms. lizardb0y (CC Licensed)

He is greenish brown, has dragon scales for skin, grows up to 32 inches and is the world's last remaining lizard-like reptile that has a lineage dating back to about 225 million years when dinosaurs still roamed the earth—he's a tuatara and he's making a comeback. A species native to New Zealand, the tuatara was spotted nesting in a sanctuary close to Wellington last week, the first such sighting in 200 years. Staff at the 620-acre Karori Wildlife Sanctuary stumbled upon four white, leathery ping-pong sized tuatara eggs during routine maintenance work at the end of last week.



Tuatara Eggs: Karori SanctuaryA rare find, the nest is the first concrete proof that tuatara are breeding again, said sanctuary officials of the species that, unlike other reptiles, has two rows of top teeth and a light-sensitive "third eye" on its forehead, which is visible for about six months when it hatches. In an effort to save the species that once flourished in the Mesozoic Era and almost neared extinction in the 1700s because of the introduction of predators like rats, the Karori Sanctuary created 70 tuatara in 2005 and another 130 in 2007, before releasing them into the wild. At the moment, tuatara can only be found living in the wild in 32 offshore islands that have been removed of possible predators.

Sanctuary officials said the eggs were most likely laid a year ago and that there could be more since an average nest usually contains around 10 eggs. If incubated properly, the eggs, which have been left at its original location to avoid any further disturbance, should hatch some time between now and March.
 

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http://www.theherald.co.za/herald/news/n23_19022009.htm

Rare quail spotted

A QUAIL feared extinct has been spotted alive for the first time in decades – on its way to a cooking pot.

Worcester‘s buttonquail was previously known only through drawings based on dead museum specimens. The live bird was snared by hunters in the Caraballo mountains of the Philippines and a film crew took pictures and video footage.

Michael Lu, president of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines, said the group was “ecstatic” about the find, but “sad that the locals do not value the biodiversity around them”.
 

IvanVolle

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....with picture here:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... photo.html

"A TV crew documented the live bird in the market before it was sold in January, according to the Agence France-Press news agency.

Michael Lu, president of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines, told AFP the bird's demise should inspire a "local consciousness" about the region's threatened wildlife.

"What if this was the last of its species?" Lu said.

However, the buttonquail is from a "notoriously cryptic and unobtrusive family of birds," according to the nonprofit Birdlife International, so the species may survive undetected in other regions."
 

UsedtobChrisFord

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What I don't understand is why the film crew didn't just buy the bird
 

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Old news, but I'd never heard of this thing before. I though that the platypus was the only known living venomous mammal. Reading around a bit though, I've found that in the UK we have two species of our own, the Water shrew and the Mole. Moles are venomous apparently. :shock:

I thought this thread would come out in cryptozoology, instead of news stories.
 

ramonmercado

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I though that the platypus was the only known living venomous mammal. Reading around a bit though, I've found that in the UK we have two species of our own, the Water shrew and the Mole
.

Don't forget George Galloway.
 

rynner2

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Rare brown long-eared bats found on Isles of Scilly

A Devon biologist has discovered a species of bat breeding on the Isles of Scilly not seen on the islands for about 40 years, a university says.
The brown long-eared bats were found on the islands off Cornwall by Dr Fiona Mathews, from the University of Exeter.
A postgraduate student and a team from the Wiltshire Bat Group were also involved in the discovery.
Dr Mathews said the team was excited because a pregnant female which was found might mean a breeding colony.

The Isles of Scilly Bat Group called in Dr Mathews and her team to help them find out more about bats on the islands, the university said.
The team was working on solving a mystery surrounding the annual disappearance of the large common pipistrelle bat colony on St Mary's. It found that they had moved to a new site.

However, it also discovered the brown-long eared bats roosting in a pine tree.
Dr Mathews said: "We found this individual roosting in an old split Monterey pine tree planted by the shore as a wind-break, and feeding along avenues of elm trees.
"Now we know the bats are there, local conservation organisations can start to improve the habitat for them."

Brown long-eareds, which have ears that are three-quarters the length of their head and body, were last seen on the Isles of Scilly in the 1960s.
They only come out to fly when it is too dark to see them, and feed mainly on moths and caterpillars.
The bats are very reliant on woodland for shelter, which is in short supply on the islands.

Dr Mathews said: "The last known colony on the Isles of Scilly disappeared when their roosting site in a building was lost and now we have a chance to reverse their fortunes."

The islands' bat group said studying the brown long-eareds would be one of its priorities over the next few years.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-13828921
 

amyasleigh

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oldrover said:
Old news, but I'd never heard of this thing before. I though that the platypus was the only known living venomous mammal. [snip]
I thought this thread would come out in cryptozoology, instead of news stories.
An article showed up on the Net last year, about a (successful) quest for the similar and related creature, the Hispaniolan Solenodon, found on the neighbouring island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The H.S. is desperately rare, and threatened by habitat destruction, but seems just to be hanging on.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/10146397
 

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'Extinct' ladybird found breeding in Devon
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-14761809

The ladybird larva was found during a survey of the wetlands in the Axe Estuary

Related Stories

Wasp turns ladybird into 'zombie'
Study shows ladybirds declining

A species of ladybird that was considered extinct in the UK in 1952 has been found breeding in east Devon.

In the past 60 years the 13-spot ladybird - Hippodamia tredecimpunctata - has "occasionally" been sighted in the UK, the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology said.

Now a single ladybird larva has been discovered by a University of Exeter student in wetlands in the Axe Estuary.

The organisation said it was the first breeding record since 1952.

'Significant discovery'
PhD student Richard Comont found the larva while he surveyed the area for wildlife.

He said: "As soon as I saw the larva I was fairly sure it was a 13-spot - it's something I've dreamt of finding.

"It's such a significant discovery that I took it back to rear it to adulthood, to make absolutely sure.

"When it finally hatched into an adult I could confirm it as the first native 13-spot for 60 years."

Andrew Whitehouse, from Buglife, a charity dedicated to maintaining sustainable populations of insects, said: "Many of Britain's invertebrate populations are declining at a drastic rate.

"It is great to have some good news."
 

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Researchers rediscover toad thought to be extinct
June 20th, 2012 in Biology / Plants & Animals

Image (c) Zootaxa.

(Phys.org) -- Researchers working for the Herpetological Foundation of Sri Lanka have obtained a specimen of the Kandyan dwarf toad (Adenomus kandianus) near a stream in a sanctuary in the island nation of Sri Lanka. Prior to its find the toad had been thought to be extinct as no reports of its existence had been published since its initial description in 1872 with further details added in 1876. The researchers describe their find in a paper published in the journal Zootaxa.

The team came upon the toad by accident, believing it to be a torrent when it was captured on a night expedition. The two species closely resemble one another and the team believes it’s likely that the group of toads from which the Kandyan was taken were likely a mix of both. The Kandyan can be distinguished from the torrent by its froglike webbed feet and dark warts on its back.

Prior to the discovery the Kandyan had been listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as extinct, primarily because it had not been seen in over a hundred years. The research team believes its status will be changed to “Critically Endangered” once updated on the list due to the threats to its environment by logging. The found specimen was definitively identified by comparing it with two specimens held in British museums since the 1800’s.

The team was in the area to perform a survey on indigenous amphibians because they say not much is known about the diversity of the populations there. The region is remote, the weather generally bad and the terrain difficult to cross, and as a result few researchers have ventured into the area to find out what sorts of animal life exists there. The Kandyan sample was in fact found back in 2009, but its existence has only come to light now due to the team publishing their paper.

Sri Lanka has the highest proportion of amphibians listed as extinct by any nation with some sixty percent of those recorded at one time or another as gone forever. The research team who found the Kandyan dwarf toad suggest that more surveys in the remotest parts of the island would likely prove some of those other listings to be incorrect as well.

More information: L. J. MENDIS WICKRAMASINGHE, DULAN RANGA VIDANAPATHIRANA & NETHU WICKRAMASINGHE (Sri Lanka): Back from the dead: The world’s rarest toad Adenomus kandianus rediscovered in Sri Lanka, Zootaxa, 3347: 63–68. http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/list/2012/3347.html (can be accessed here)
Abstract

Adenomus kandianus Günther (1872) was previously known only from two specimens both deposited in the British Museum, the holotype BMNH1947.2.20.63, and the syntype of A. kelaarti BMNH1947.2.20.62. The only record of A. kandianus since the initial description in 1872 was by Ferguson in 1876, who mentions two specimens resembling Bufo kandianus in his collection, making A. kandianus the world’s rarest toad. The species had not been reported since, and was considered extinct. Here we report on its rediscovery.

© 2012 Phys.Org

"Researchers rediscover toad thought to be extinct." June 20th, 2012. http://phys.org/news/2012-06-rediscover ... tinct.html
 

rynner2

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Crypto no more:

World's rarest whale seen for first time
The world’s rarest whale has been seen for the first time after a mother and calf were washed up on a beach in New Zealand.
By Nick Collins, Science Correspondent
5:00PM GMT 05 Nov 2012

Spade-toothed beaked whales were first discovered in 1872 when bone fragments were found on a remote Pacific island, but until now the species has remained entirely hidden from human view.
In the 140 years since they were first discovered, the only sign that the creatures' continued existence lay in two partial skulls found in New Zealand in the 1950s and Chile in 1986.

Now scientists have reported a complete description of the whales, which are thought to spend most of their lives in the deep waters of the Pacific Ocean, only rarely coming to the surface.

The Mother and her male calf were stranded on Opape Beach at the northern tip of New Zealand in December 2010 but were initially thought to be of a much more common species known as Gray's beaked whales.
It was only after routine DNA analysis that experts realised their true identity.

Dr Rochelle Constantine of the University of Auckland said: "This is the first time this species — a whale over five meters in length — has ever been seen as a complete specimen, and we were lucky enough to find two of them.
"Up until now, all we have known about the spade-toothed beaked whale was from three partial skulls collected from New Zealand and Chile over a 140-year period. It is remarkable that we know almost nothing about such a large mammal."

Because the animals had never been seen very little is known about their behaviour, but writing in the Current Biology journal, the researchers suggested they were likely to be "exceptionally deep divers, foraging for squid and small fish and spending little time at the surface."

Dr Constantine said it was unclear why the species has been so elusive, but added: "It may be that they are simply an offshore species that lives and dies in the deep ocean waters and only rarely wash ashore. New Zealand is surrounded by massive oceans. There is a lot of marine life that remains unknown to us."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildli ... -time.html
 
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