Extinct? Missing? Not So Much (Rediscovered Animal Species; MIA Or Believed Extinct)

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
50,941
Reaction score
25,060
Points
284
Location
Eblana
We now nose it's not extinct.

Nearly 130 years ago, Italian explorer Elio Modigliani arrived at a natural history museum in Genoa with a lizard he’d reportedly collected from the forests of Indonesia.

Based on Modigliani’s specimen, the striking lizard — notable for a horn that protrudes from its nose — got its official taxonomic description and name, Harpesaurus modiglianii, in 1933. But no accounts of anyone finding another such lizard were ever recorded, until now.

drawing of Modigliani’s nose-horned lizard


This illustration of Modigliani’s nose-horned lizard was made in 1933 based on the original lizard first found in 1891. That specimen turned pale blue due to how it was preserved.C.A. PUTRA ET AL/TAPROBANICA: THE JOURNAL OF ASIAN BIODIVERSITY, 2020, ANNALI DEL MUSEO CIVICO DI STORIA NATURALE DI GENOVA 56, PL. VI

In June 2018, Chairunas Adha Putra, an independent wildlife biologist conducting a bird survey in a mountainous region surrounding Lake Toba in Indonesia’s North Sumatra, called herpetologist Thasun Amarasinghe. Near the lake, which fills the caldera of a supervolcano, Putra had found “a dead lizard with interesting morphological features, but he wasn’t sure what it was,” says Amarasinghe, who later asked the biologist to send the specimen to Jakarta.

It took only a look at the lizard’s nose-horn for Amarasinghe to suspect that he was holding Modigliani’s lizard. “It is the only nose-horned lizard species found in North Sumatra,” he says.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/nose-horned-dragon-lizard-lost-science-found
 
Last edited by a moderator:

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
18,647
Reaction score
24,912
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
Nearly 130 years ago, Italian explorer Elio Modigliani arrived at a natural history museum in Genoa with a lizard he’d reportedly collected from the forests of Indonesia.
modig-liz-a.jpg
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
18,647
Reaction score
24,912
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
After a 50-year lapse in documented sightings, the elephant shrew (aka sengi) is found to be alive and well in Africa.
Elephant shrew rediscovered in Africa after 50 years

A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity.

The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings.

The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition.

Elephant shrews, or sengis, are neither elephants nor shrews, but related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees.

They have distinctive trunk-like noses, which they use to feast on insects.

There are 20 species of sengis in the world, and the Somali sengi (Elephantulus revoilii) is one of the most mysterious, known to science only from 39 individuals collected decades ago and stored in museums. The species was previously known only from Somalia, hence its name.

Steven Heritage, a research scientist at the Duke University Lemur Center in Durham, US, and a member of the expedition to the Horn of Africa in 2019, said he was thrilled to put the species "back on the radar". ...
FULL STORY: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53820395
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
30,706
Reaction score
17,045
Points
309
Cute! I does look like it has a large head in comparison to its body.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
50,941
Reaction score
25,060
Points
284
Location
Eblana
Welcome back!

A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity.

The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition.

Elephant shrews, or sengis, are neither elephants nor shrews, but related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees. They have distinctive trunk-like noses, which they use to feast on insects.

There are 20 species of sengis in the world, and the Somali sengi (Elephantulus revoilii) is one of the most mysterious, known to science only from 39 individuals collected decades ago and stored in museums. The species was previously known only from Somalia, hence its name.

Steven Heritage, a research scientist at the Duke University Lemur Center in Durham, US, and a member of the expedition to the Horn of Africa in 2019, said he was thrilled to put the species "back on the radar".

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53820395
 

Bad Bungle

Dingo took my tray bake.
Joined
Oct 13, 2018
Messages
2,067
Reaction score
5,525
Points
204
Location
The Chilterns
Surely it can't be 50 years since I last saw a Naturalist wittering on about Elphant shrews - that nose is just made for telly.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
18,647
Reaction score
24,912
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
Surely it can't be 50 years since I last saw a Naturalist wittering on about Elphant shrews - that nose is just made for telly.
There are multiple elephant shrew species, of which only the one African species was considered MIA.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
18,647
Reaction score
24,912
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
For circa 50 years the New Guinea singing dog was known only by the severely inbred population of specimens conservationists had collected. In 2016 it was determined that singing dogs seemed to be still living in the wild. In 2018 further research established the wild population is at least far more genetically pure than the inbred captive population.
Rare 'singing' dog, thought to be extinct in wild for 50 years, still thrives

This dog can sing ... or at least it can yodel.

The New Guinea singing dog, an extremely rare breed, is best known for its unique barks and howls -- it's able to make harmonic sounds that have been compared to the calls of a humpback whale.

Only around 200 captive singing dogs live in conservation centers or zoos, the descendants of a few wild dogs captured in the 1970s. The animals are severely inbred due to a lack of new genes.

None had been seen in their natural habitat for half a century until 2016, when an expedition located and studied 15 wild dogs in the remote highlands of the western side of New Guinea, known as Papua, in Indonesia. A new expedition returned to the study site in 2018 to collect detailed biological samples to confirm whether these highland wild dogs truly are the predecessors of the singing dogs. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/31/asia/singing-dog-found-in-wild-scn-trnd/index.html
 

titch

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Sep 30, 2009
Messages
3,467
Reaction score
4,351
Points
169
For circa 50 years the New Guinea singing dog was known only by the severely inbred population of specimens conservationists had collected. In 2016 it was determined that singing dogs seemed to be still living in the wild. In 2018 further research established the wild population is at least far more genetically pure than the inbred captive population.


FULL STORY: https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/31/asia/singing-dog-found-in-wild-scn-trnd/index.html
I will give them a round of a paws
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
50,941
Reaction score
25,060
Points
284
Location
Eblana
For circa 50 years the New Guinea singing dog was known only by the severely inbred population of specimens conservationists had collected. In 2016 it was determined that singing dogs seemed to be still living in the wild. In 2018 further research established the wild population is at least far more genetically pure than the inbred captive population.


FULL STORY: https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/31/asia/singing-dog-found-in-wild-scn-trnd/index.html
Bet they do Bowie songs.
 

madmath

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Oct 17, 2001
Messages
196
Reaction score
189
Points
74
I was thinking they'd prefer The Baha Men. Or "Jingle Bells".
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
5,481
Reaction score
8,520
Points
284
'Ghost' frog not seen for 80 years rediscovered in desert hot spring


https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/24/americas/chile-ghost-frog-scli-intl-scn/index.html

"Chilean scientists have rediscovered a species of frog last seen more than 80 years ago, prompting new calls for the conservation of its habitat in the far-flung Chilean desert.

Scientists relocated the diminutive Hall's water frog, named for the American researcher and collector Frank Gregory Hall who discovered the species in 1935, in a tiny hot spring oasis near Ollagüe in Chile's Atacama desert."
 
Top