IFOs (Identified Flying Objects): Manmade Disc / Saucer Aircraft

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Anonymous

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#1
Hi fellow forteans,

Take a look at this:

http://www.laesieworks.com/

NOTE: The IFO (Identified Flying Objects historical review) materials are now in this sub-area of the site:

http://www.laesieworks.com/ifo/index.html

Amazing stuff!

It's a collection of real manmade flying saucers, many of which are government created!?

Could explain a lot of things...

What does everyone think?

Indra
 
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MrSnowman

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#2
That's a fascinating website. I like his philosophy of breaking things down to the simple parts, and finding a way of gluing them all together to make one big complicated thing, as opposed to trying to create a functioning system in one go.

I also admire the guy because if you read the rest of the website, he's actually paralysed from the shoulders down, and has managed to make that website all by himself, presumably using the specialist equipment that he describes. He does allude to a possible cure for paralysis being developed through the same philosophy as his VTOL craft; start with the little things and make them fit into a system, rather than trying to create a system in one go. A voice in the wilderness I fear, however.
 

Yithian

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#3
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#6
INVENTION: Flying saucer is out of this world

THERE are some strange goings-on in a small Peterborough workshop.
Mysterious flying saucers seen around the city have pricked the curiosity of secretive US defence officials.

A group of dedicated space enthusiasts at GFS Projects Limited – which stands for Geoff's Flying Saucer – have been tinkering away with some alien designs in their own Area 51 in Saxon Road.

For six years, Geoff Hatton and his team have worked tirelessly to take a giant leap into the unknown and created six realistic flying saucers.

And now the uniqueness of the machines, which can take off vertically, fly, hover and land, has attracted the imagination of the American officials who went to see if the truth really was out there.

Like a scene from the X-Files, the men in black flew across the Atlantic to check out the UFOs and see if the truth really is out there.

But what the US officials want with the mysterious machines remains Top Secret.

Geoff, of Eastfield Road, Peterborough, who was celebrating his 67th birthday on Monday, said: "It is extremely pleasing to have anything you do recognised by other people.

"It was an exploratory meeting set up by a third party. After the meetings I had the impression they were pleased with what they had seen. We will just have to wait. I have no idea what they want them for."

The hub-cap like machines look like they've been lifted from a '50s B-movie.

They glide gracefully through the air using the Coanda principle, which involves jets of nozzled air being attracted to a nearby curved surfaces.

To date, all the prototypes have been battery-powered, but GFS believe larger versions could have proper internal combustion engines.

Geoff, who first came up with the plans for the saucers while sitting on his dining room table, added: "We are the only company in the world doing this sort of thing. The future is shaping up to be very promising indeed."

Shane Miller (24), of Parnwell, Peterborough, is the youngest member of the team.

He said: "When I first saw the saucers when I started last August, I simply said 'wow'."

The team are not relying on the outcome of the visit from the American government – as the company is constantly dreaming up new ways of marketing the saucers.

They believe the flying saucers can be adapted as toys, to aid mountain rescues, land mine detection and even as a state-of-the-art scarecrows.

To set the ball rolling, the company secured a £43,000 SMART grant from the Department of Trade and Industry and equity funding from a group of investors. The saucers range from 10ins to three feet in diameter.

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• For more information, visit www.gfsprojects.co.uk

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18 January 2006
www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/ViewArticle ... ID=1317313
Link is dead. The full text of the specific article is quoted above. The MIA webpage is archived at the Wayback Machine:


https://web.archive.org/web/2006030...Article2.aspx?SectionID=845&ArticleID=1317313

-----------------
See also:
www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18553
 
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Human_84

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#7
EDIT....

Decided not to post that information as nobody would believe it.
 
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#9
Human_84 said:
EDIT....

Decided not to post that information as nobody would believe it.
Ah ha but I read it before the edit and The Emperor never forgets.

I'm not sure whether its an issue of believing you or not but I certainly want more details!!

Who is the guy, where is this happening and does it really look like that? Add in has it flown? Did he get the information from his abduction experience or did it derive from more terrestrial research?
 

rynner2

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#11
I love GFS! ( gfsprojects.co.uk )
Link is dead, as is the domain.


What a wonderfully simple, understated website!
How very British! :D

But a good video demo.


More power to their elbow!
 
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EnolaGaia

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#13
I love GFS! ( gfsprojects.co.uk )
Link is dead, as is the domain.
Here is the full text of the 2006 entry page for the MIA domain, salvaged from the Wayback Machine.
Our History
GFS Projects Limited was formed in 2002 to design, develop and market a new form of flying. Our Unmanned Aerial vehicle (UAV) is based on the ideas and research of Geoff Hatton – the inventor. The company secured a SMART grant from the Department of Trade & Industry and equity funding from a group of investors.
GFS7 took to the air in April 2005 and completed a figure of eight flight, inside the development building. Four patent applications covering the unique aspects of the design have been filed.


The GFS UAV
Our UAV is capable of vertical take off, fully controlled flight, hovering and landing on a specified point. By using the Coanda principle to create lift, it has very little downwash and is aerodynamically stable. To date all prototypes have been battery powered, but the design is scalable and the larger versions will have internal combustion engines.

Applications and uses
The craft will be most useful in urban environments, where its ability to hover and fly close to and within buildings will enable close quarter surveillance and intelligence gathering. Having no exposed rotating parts, brushes with walls etc., do not compromise the craft’s flight.
Numerous applications have been identified, including battlefield & urban surveillance, intelligent targeting, disaster area reconnaissance, communications relay and jamming, sensor distribution, land mine detection, air quality sampling, listening and search & rescue. For a complete list of applications click here.

The Development Programme
Flight duration and payload are still limited, and the company is now focused on optimising fan, motors and canopy specifications, with a view to having a commercially solid range of capabilities by 2008. We are also seeking joint venture partners and licensees to work with in each of the main market sectors.

The Development Team
Geoff Hatton leads a team of aeronautics graduates and workshop technicians. Academic input comes from Dr H Babinsky at Cambridge University.
SOURCE: https://web.archive.org/web/20060421201458/http://www.gfsprojects.co.uk/
 

EnolaGaia

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#14
ADIFO-A.jpg
Here's the latest (and seemingly quite successful) prototype - ADIFO (All-DirectionalFlying Object), developed after years of work by two Romanians.

It uses ducted fans and the Coanda effect, like many of the historical prototypes surveyed in the links above.
Romanian Engineers Have Created a Fully Functional Flying Sauce

Against a clear blue sky, a craft that looks strikingly similar to two pie plates stacked atop each other suddenly ascends into the air. Swiftly charging forward, as the object passes by, it’s nearly impossible not to suddenly feel a kinship with pilot Kenneth Arnold. However, unlike Arnold and his famous 1947 flying saucer sighting, this particular flying object isn’t unidentified. Instead, this is the brainchild of Romanian engineer Razvan Sabie and aerodynamicist Iosif Taposu, who claim they’ve developed a fully functional flying saucer.

Without question, the All-Directional Flying Object, or ADIFO, looks exactly like a stereotypical flying saucer. However, ADIFO’s creators say the inspiration for their uniquely shaped aircraft doesn't come from UFO lore. Instead, they say the disk is designed to mimic the back cross-section of a dolphin's airfoil.

In his first interview with American media, inventor Razan Sabie said the ADIFO isn’t the work of audacious mad science. “The aerodynamics behind this aircraft is the result of more than two decades of work and is very well reasoned in hundreds of pages and confirmed by computer simulations and wind tunnel tests,” Sabie explained. Sabie’s partner is Iosif Taposu, a former senior scientist at Romania's National Institute for Aerospatiale Research, and Head of Theoretical Aerodynamics at the National Aviation Institute. On paper, the duo don’t appear to be a pair of rogue backyard engineers or hobbyists.

Operating like a quadcopter, ADIFO handles “take-off, landing, and slow speed maneuvers” through four ducted fans. A pair of jet engines located at the rear of the flying disc provide horizontal thrust. Sabie says the dual-propulsion system can vector individually, affording the ADIFO a high degree of agility during level flight. Rounding out ADIFO’s unique design are a pair of lateral thrust nozzles located on each side of the disc, which allow the disk to rapidly push itself sideways in either direction, or quickly rotate while in flight. ...

Sabie and Taposu unveiled a 4-foot operational prototype of ADIFO in spring of this year. According to Sabie, a full-scale model of the flying saucer would represent “a new and revolutionary flight paradigm.” Sabie claims the ADIFO’s unusual shape “is ‘natural born’ for supersonic flight.” He said the design should “reduce shock waves on the disk’s surface” thus preventing the occurrence of sonic booms during transonic flight. He believes the disk will be capable of “sudden lateral transitions and sudden yaw,” in addition to “smooth transitions during subsonic to supersonic flight.” ...
FULL STORY: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/...reated-a-fully-functional-flying-saucer-adifo

SEE ALSO:

THESE GUYS BUILT A FLYING SAUCER THAT ACTUALLY FLIES PRETTY WELL
https://futurism.com/the-byte/flying-saucer-flies-pretty-well

Someone Built a Flying Saucer That Actually Flies And We're So Here For It
https://www.sciencealert.com/someon...-that-actually-flies-and-we-re-so-here-for-it
 

EnolaGaia

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#15
Here's some historical overview commentary from the Vice article cited above. To see the graphics and a video link, go to the linked webpage.

... But before you go booking your flight on a flying saucer, it’s important to remember this isn’t humankind’s first rodeo with this sort of technology.

In 1932, another Romanian aerospace engineer, Henri Coanda, is credited with being the person to develop a small-scale flying disk prototype. Twelve years before a flying saucer allegedly crashed in Roswell, New Mexico, in 1936, Coanda was even successful in securing a patent for his “Propelling Device.” Unfortunately, no full-scale version of the device, which intended to achieve flight through the use of high-pressure gases flowing through a ring-shaped vent system, was ever built. Instead, Coanda had to settle on being forever known for discovering the “Coanda Effect”—the physics behind why a spinning ping pong ball can be suspended by a diagonal stream of air.

Years later, the most notable attempt to develop a man-made flying saucer came in the late 1950s, with British aircraft designer John “Jack” Frost.

Funded by the US Air Force, Frost’s initial vision was a disc-shaped fighter-like aircraft that would be capable of achieving speeds upwards of Mach 3.5 and reaching altitudes of 100,000 feet. Called the Y-2 “Flat Riser, Frost believed he could achieve lift and thrust by using the Coanda Effect from the exhaust produced by a single “turborotor.”

Operating under the Air Force codename "Project 1794” after three years of design and testing, the results were a Y-2 prototype that caught fire three times and after a 1956 test, where the craft’s Viper jet engine “ran wild,” even the staff was scared of the vehicle.

In 1958 Frost scrapped the Y-2 and decided to try and create a smaller flying disk, dubbed the “Avrocar.” No longer a high-flying fighter, the US Army eagerly bought in on the idea, considering the Avrocar to be the eventual replacement for the jeep and helicopter.

Sadly, the Avrocar equally had serious flight control problems. As NASA Ames Chief Test Pilot Fred J. Drinkwater III put it, “Flying the Avrocar was “like trying to balance on a beach ball.” By 1961, after it was determined flight above 10,000 feet was “dangerous if not nearly impossible,” funding for Avrocar was canceled.

Since the demise of the Avorcar, a few others have made unfounded claims that they'd designed a real flying saucer. Engineer Paul Moller has spent nearly 50-years trying to develop one, but has yet to deliver on his promise of an affordable flying saucer-style hovercraft, the Moller M200G Volantor. ...
 

eburacum

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#16
Modern computer-controlled thrust systems can iron out the stability problems; I'm amazed at my friend's drone which can remain stationary in a significant breeze, and this is all down to smart automatic feedback systems.

This 'flying saucer seems to be basically a drone inside an aerodynamic shell, although they are talking about adding jets. Maybe we'll get our flying cars one day after all.
 
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